first_imgTUNIS, Tunisia (AP) – A former prime minister who led Tunisia’s transition government after the fall of its autocratic leader has launched a new political party to counter-balance the Islamists running the North African country.Beji Caid Essebsi announced the formation of the Nida’ Tounes, or Call of Tunisia, party on Saturday before thousands of men and women _ including a number of artists _ in a packed hall. The 85-year-old said he wants a party “that unifies everyone, without exclusion.” He called it a “balancing force that can create conditions for an alternative.” The moderate Islamist Ennahda party was elected after a transition period following the January 2011 ouster of Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. However, hardline Islamists are emerging and last week clashed with police over an art exhibit they judged blasphemous.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Sponsored Stories Clean energy: Why it matters for Arizona Top Stories Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates New high school in Mesa lets students pick career pathscenter_img More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Comments   Share   How Arizona is preparing the leader of the next generation Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family How do cataracts affect your vision?last_img

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first_img The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. Related Content News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 06, 2019 Canon Medical Introduces Encore Orian MR Upgrade Program Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. is helping to provide low-cost patient care solutions for its customers with the launch… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more January 29, 2013 — In a study designed to see if doctors who are told the exact price of expensive medical tests like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in advance would order fewer of them, Johns Hopkins researchers got their answer: No.In a report published online in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, the researchers found that revealing the costs of MRIs and other imaging tests up front had no impact on the number of tests doctors ordered for their hospitalized patients.“Cost alone does not seem to be the determining factor in deciding to go ahead with an expensive radiographic test,” says the study’s senior author, Daniel J. Brotman, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the hospitalist program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. “There is definitely an over-ordering of tests in this country, and we can make better decisions about whether our patients truly need each test we order for them. But when it comes to big-ticket tests like MRI, it appears the doctors have already decided they need to know the information, regardless of the cost of the test.”Studies in the past suggest that much of the expense of laboratory tests, medical imaging and prescription drugs is unknown or hidden from providers and patients at the time of ordering, leaving financial considerations largely out of the health care decision-making process and likely driving up costs, Brotman notes.Other studies have shown that doctors ordered fewer laboratory tests in some cases when they were given the price up front. But Brotman says imaging tests appear to be “a different animal.”There are built-in disincentives to ordering many major tests if they are not necessary, such as the potential danger of radiation used in some, Brotman says. In addition to making physicians more sensitive to the costliness of unnecessary testing, Brotman says they need to learn how to explain to patients why they may not need them.For the study, Brotman and his colleagues identified the 10 imaging tests most frequently ordered for patients at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dividing the tests into two groups, they made sure prices were attached to one group over a six-month period, from November 2009 to May 2010. Brotman and his colleagues left out the pricing information for the other group over the same time period. Prices are not typically shared with physicians or patients in most medical settings.When the researchers compared the ordering rates to the rates from a six-month period a year earlier, when no costs were displayed at all, they found no significant difference in ordering patterns.Brotman says he might have been concerned if there was a large decrease in ordering expensive tests, as there are many instances when the expensive test is justified. For example, when a patient appears to have had a sub-acute stroke, an MRI is often justified “regardless of cost,” he says. “When a key diagnosis is needed in imaging, there are limited options for comparison shopping.”That is not to say there are not times when physicians need to look more closely at whether too many imaging tests are being ordered, Brotman says. For example, patients in a hospital intensive care unit who are on a ventilator and unable to tell doctors how they are feeling may not need a daily chest X-ray to scan for potential problems. Brotman says there is evidence that outcomes are not compromised if X-rays are ordered only when the patient’s condition appears to be worsening. MRIs are also ordered too frequently for lower back pain, he says.“For too long, there has not been enough attention paid to the bottom line in health care,” Brotman says. This is not about rationing care to hold down costs, he says, but about choosing tests a little more wisely. “There are financial consequences for the choices we make, and for too long we haven’t considered them,” he says.Even though price transparency did not influence the way physicians ordered imaging tests in his study, Brotman says financial considerations may play a role in other circumstances if tied to clinical evidence.For example, he says, when clinical programs began to compare the amount of blood products used by surgeons, those who were using far more than their peers (and with similar patient outcomes) took note and reduced their reliance on transfusions, which are not only costly but also carry risks.If you show a provider that he or she is ordering four times as many computed tomography (CT) scans as a colleague whose patients have similar outcomes, it could change the decision-making calculus for the better, he says.“Cost transparency must be part of the solution to solving fiscal challenges in medicine,” Brotman says. “Providers have no idea how much they’re spending. Patients don’t know either. Having everyone understand more of the economics of health care is a great place to start cutting costs in medicine.”The study was supported, in part, by the Research and Education Foundation of the Radiological Society of North America, the Walter and Mary Ciceric Research Award and the Johns Hopkins Hospitalist Scholars Program.Other Johns Hopkins researchers involved in the study include Daniel J. Durand, M.D.; Leonard S. Feldman, M.D.; and Jonathan S. Lewin, M.D.For more information: www.hopkinsmedicine.org/gim/faculty/brotman.html FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more center_img The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Feature | January 29, 2013 Transparent Pricing Does Not Curb Doctors’ Use of High-Cost Hospital Imaging Tests Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read morelast_img

first_imgYesterday, IBM Watson announced the launch a set of new pre-trained AI tools for offering Connected Manufacturing. This offering includes a method and approach to help clients accelerate their IoT transformation, from strategy, implementation and security to managed services and ongoing operations. This new approach will help IBM’s client to connect all their manufacturing equipment, sensors, and systems for business improvement across OEE, quality, lead times and productivity. What is this new AI Watson enabled IoT approach all about? This new IoT offering by IBM focuses on industries that are heavily IoT dependent–industrial equipment, automotive (smart vehicles) and buildings (smart spaces). The IBM’s AI Watson solution, when combined with its Industrial IoT platform empowers,  provides ‘things’ with the data they need to understand the physical world as everything becomes connected. This helps customers to take advantage of the vast amounts of data generated by IoT. Kareem Yusuf, GM, IBM Watson IoT says, “We decided to release this largest-ever AI toolset pre-trained for industries and professions to help businesses re-imagine how they work. A key business advantage lies in tapping into organizational insights, historical customer data, internal reporting, past transactions, and client interactions. These elements are too often underutilized.” Rob Enderle, Principal Analyst at tech analyst firm The Enderle Group said, “Training is where AI deployments get hung up. Much of the initial work with developed AI is to create this training, which then, through machine learning, can be passed on to new systems, significantly lowering the deployment cost and time to value. This is a critical phase to maturing the platform and getting it closer to its operational and sales potential.” With the heavy lifting completed during the training period, Watson is ready to start producing targeted, industry-specific insights right away. Enderle further added, “Getting the system to this phase is anything but trivial. Once there, machine learning can allow the replication of an unlimited number of systems,”. Areas where IBM is pre-training Watson for industries and functions Agriculture AI-powered visual recognition capabilities let growers decide where to spray pesticides, determine the severity of damage from pests and diseases, and forecast water usage. Farmers also gain insights from temperature and moisture levels, as well as crop distress. Human Resources IBM Watson Talent lets recruiters analyze the backgrounds of top-performing employees to find candidates for new positions. In fact, AI could help reduce bias in hiring decisions, according to IBM. Psychologists helped IBM produce an AI scoring system, which lets recruiters quickly sort through candidates. Marketing IBM Watson Assistant for Marketing is a component of Watson Campaign Automation SaaS. The assistant allows companies to evaluate their marketing campaigns, engage in more direct conversations with customers, and create a personalized customer experience. Manufacturing The Watson toolset for the manufacturing industry will provide visual and acoustic inspection capabilities. AI technology will also allow manufacturers to predict when equipment failures might occur, as well as energy waste and product quality issues. AI will let manufacturers gain insights and deal with workforce attrition, skills gaps, and rising raw material costs. The pre-training is also taking place in the advertising, commercial and transportation space To know more about this in detail, visit IBM’s official website. Read Next How IBM Watson is paving the road for Healthcare 3.0 Watson-CoreML : IBM and Apple’s new machine learning collaboration project Stack skills, not degrees: Industry-leading companies, Google, IBM, Apple no longer require degreeslast_img

first_img Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Did you have a certain plan for training camp with Karlos Dansby as far as days off?“And he’s had a leg that’s been bothering him and we finally found out why. He doesn’t need that much work. He’s always in great shape but football shape is a different thing and we still have three weeks.”Do you remember that game in 2002 when Leftwich was hobbling on one leg in college?“Oh, yeah. Very well. When I was doing his evaluation you knew he had grit and leadership. Not many guys, offensive linemen, are going to pick him up and carry him to the next play, pick him up and carry him to the next play. And not many guys are going to stay out there and play. It spoke volumes of the type of person he is.”Why are you playing the starters more in the preseason?“Just get in better game shape when you have to play more plays in a row. It was nice to have that nice long drive last week to keep conditioned but then over a three-hour period to be able to do it at the end of a game is very hard to get in the preseason without risking too much injury.”How are you adjusting to your new diet?“I feel really good. It’s kind of crazy being a vegan for awhile. I’m not a vegan anymore. I finally had meat again.” How much more valuable is his presence in the absence of Calais Campbell?“He’s always been the leader of that room. To have him in there, it’s invaluable. You can’t put a price tag on what he brings to the whole defense, not just to that room.”He likes to fly under the radar, doesn’t he?“Yeah. He’s not looking for accolades and all those things. He just wants to make sure everybody is doing it right. Tells me when he thinks we need something, which I respect. And when he tells me, ‘hey, we need to work harder or we need to work less,’ I’ll listen”Have any players expressed an interest in protesting the National Anthem to you?“Of ours? None.”What do you want to see from Haason Reddick in these next couple of weeks?“Just continued growth. He’s improved a bunch. He was on the ME (mental error) sheet a little bit too much this week. We added a bunch more stuff. I would like to also get him rushing from the outside more in his natural position in these last three weeks.”When you have Harold Goodwin or Byron Leftwich call plays do you ever sit down with them and critique what they did?“They’ll come to me and, ‘hey, what’d you think?’ And whether it’s a cocktail or a cup of coffee, we’ll hash it out.” Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Top Stories What did you have?“I had a grass-fed burger. It was really good with nothing else and a bunch of vegetables. I feel really, really good on it. I was shocked I could even stick to it. I was kind of proud I did for 27 days.”That was all you needed to do it for?“Doctors are gradually bringing protein back into my diet.”What did you like about the vegan diet?“Nothing.”Could you eat your famous Brussels sprouts?“No, they weren’t on it—  I did, I snuck out and got them but there’s a whole lot of butter and bacon in those babies. I cheated. I told them, ‘I’m eating Brussels sprouts.’ ‘Oh, you did good.’”Follow Craig Grialou on Twitter What do you prefer?“Definitely a cocktail. The doctor won’t let me drink coffee much anymore.”Are you brutally honest with them?“Oh yeah. Again, it’s coaching, it’s not criticism. ‘Didn’t like this call. Thought this was a great call. Why’d you make that call? Was it a gut (decision)? Did you have it planned?’ They both have studied the teams they’re calling plays against probably a whole lot more than I would have in the preseason so that they have a good feel for who they’re going against.”How valuable has his preseason work been for many of those backup offensive linemen?“It’s great because with the rules we’re only going to be in pads once a week for 11 weeks. This is the only good thing about the Hall of Fame Game is having five extra days in pads with all these young guys, especially linemen.”After this weekend you won’t be back in this building for a game in awhile.“This is the last time we’ll be in this stadium for, what, six weeks. We’ll miss it. It will be a good challenge.”How is the field holding up?“Fantastic. It doesn’t look pretty but it’s fantastic. It amazes me how we beat that thing up and they have it just — you can still stand and run and there’s grass.” (AP Photo) Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling “Thought yesterday was a solid practice. I thought defensively we gave up too many touchdowns in that red zone period. We’ve been playing really good red zone defense. That was kind of the first day. Everybody is ready to break camp but we still got another week.”How did D.J. Humphries look to you?“Looked really good. Fresh. Had a really good practice.”Do you think he can play Saturday?“Yeah.”Are you seeing signs of the old Tyrann Mathieu?“Yeah, there’s been a bunch of it. He’s got his hands on a lot of balls. Just missed a couple. Until it’s real bullets, we’ll have to see it then.”He said he’s challenged himself to learn to like free safety.“It’s boring back there for him, just covering the middle of the field. He likes the action. I like him in the action, too.”By the end of preseason will your starters have played more than a year ago?“I hope so. We’ll see. They did in the first game. The 15 plays over probably four or five or six last year. Some didn’t play. We’re trying to not overdo it, especially certain guys who don’t need it.”How has Frostee Rucker looked to you in camp?“He’s so much healthier. Tried to give him a day off and he wouldn’t take it so he finally took it yesterday. He’s in such good condition for the first time in a couple of years. He got that high ankle and the knee that just bugged him for the whole season.” 4 Comments   Share   GLENDALE, Ariz. – Head coach Bruce Arians, now in his fifth year with the Arizona Cardinals, meets the media each day during training camp.Here, in this space, we’ll highlight many of the key topics and personnel conversations he has with reporters following the morning walk-through.“No news on the injury front. Probably the first practice we’ve had in awhile nobody got hurt. We had one scare but he’s back already.last_img

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