first_imgRespecting community and indigenous rights to collective land tenure and forest management could help avert climate change — and save us billions of dollars, according to a new report from the Washington-based World Resources Institute (WRI).The report is based on case studies of community territories in Asia, Africa and Latin America — including indigenous territories in the Brazilian Amazon and community forest concessions in Guatemala’s Mayan Biosphere Reserve. Researchers found that forests under the groups’ control and management are better preserved, emitting less carbon and storing more than forests where local communities have weak control.In the Brazilian Amazon’s indigenous territories, which cover 13 percent of the country, the benefits from carbon capture and averted emissions amount to $161.7 billion over 20 years, according to the report. And in the Mayan Biosphere, the benefits amount to $605 million over 20 years.These findings will bolster the demands voiced by 300 indigenous women from different countries across the region who meet Tuesday in Guatemala City in the run up to the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP21), which will be held in Paris from November 30 to December 11. The women want recognition of their role as key agents in the fight against global warming. They also want greater access to technology and financial resources to further that role.Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous People, praised the WRI report. “[It] is very significant in terms of establishing the links between human rights and forest protection and sustainable use. It’s sending a message to governments to link respect for the rights of indigenous people to their land and resources to the climate change mitigation activities that [governments] are supposed to commit to,” she told The Tico Times.Tauli-Corpuz added that the region’s governments need to do more to ensure that community land titles are respected and that indigenous lands are not taken over by special economic interests, like mining and monoculture plantations, or even drug traffickers.“In Honduras, for example, indigenous people have collective land titles but [outside] land owners are invading their land for African palm plantations and there is invasion from other interests such as hydroelectric dams and mining,” she said.An interactive map released in conjunction with the report allows users to explore indigenous and community-owned land around the world: Community and indigenous lands in Central America and part of South America. (landmarkmap.org)Benefits of community forest tenure outweigh costsThe World Resources Institute study also found that the estimated annual cost per hectare of securing community forest tenure is low compared to the benefits from reducing carbon emissions and preventing deforestation. In Brazil, a $19 per hectare investment today would yield the equivalent of $1,473 per hectare in benefits in 20 years, WRI found. In Guatemala, a $63 per hectare investment today, would yield $1,899 per hectare in benefits, including economic benefits to communities through sustainable harvesting and the sale of forest products.Peter Viet, director of the WRI’s Land and Resources Rights Initiative, said compared to the indigenous communities in Brazil’s Amazon, communities in Guatemala’s Mayan Biosphere Reserve found it harder to comply with the government’s long list of requirements for managing the land, which includes annual audits and forest management plans. “These communities are not indigenous; they were more recent groupings of individuals so they didn’t have the social cohesion and there were conflicts internally. Also, compared to Brazil, Guatemala is more bureaucratic and as a result, there’s more costs,” he said.Overall, the figures presented in the report make a compelling case for the environmental, social and economic benefits of community forestry.“In these two case studies we found that community forestry adds the highest value; it’s not agriculture or cattle raising or the exploitation of minerals, it’s sustainable forestry,” Juan Carlos Altamirano, an economist for the WRI, told The Tico Times.Plus, community forestry can help reduce costs associated with resource conflicts that often accompany extractive industries, like mining, and others that are non-community based.A recent study by Guatemala’s Human Rights Ombudsman’s Office highlighted mining and hydroelectric dams as the main source of conflict in Guatemala.Community managed forests in TotonicapánIn the department of Totonicapán, located in Guatemala’s western highlands, forest land is divided into 48 cantons that have been communally owned by Maya Kiché communities since colonial times.Logging within a three-mile radius of water resources is strictly forbidden and if a family needs to fell a tree for firewood, it must seek prior consent from indigenous community leaders and only the oldest trees can be felled. The penalties for breaking these rules depends on the size of the tree that was felled and range from planting five trees to paying fines equivalent to $64 to $102.In order to ensure forest regeneration, every year in May leaders distribute tree seedlings from a community greenhouse so that every member of the community can plant five trees in an area of their choice.The communities also observe strict rules regarding the use of water from six sources in the forest. If a family wishes to build a house it must seek permission from the local water committee. Using water for activities considered superfluous, such as washing cars and motorbikes, is forbidden.According to Guatemala’s Ministry for the Environment and Natural Resources, Totonicapán has the lowest deforestation rate in the country.“The crucial factor in Totonicapán is communal land ownership and the establishment of strategic alliances with the government,” said Andrea Ixchiú, former president of the board of natural resources for Totonicapán’s 48 cantons. “Governance and the use of resources improves when communities coordinate actions with the state.”If the benefits of community forestry outweigh those of environmentally hazardous industries such as oil extraction, why have the region’s governments been reluctant to phase out bureaucratic hurdles, implement agrarian reforms and invest in communal land ownership programs? According to the WRI, in 2013 indigenous peoples and communities held legal rights to only about 15.5 percent of the world’s forests.Viet from WRI indicated that many governments are reluctant to cede control over natural resources to local groups because they don’t trust their ability to manage them well.“There’s a real nervousness on the part of governments to decentralize forests to communities due to a concern over capacity,” Viet from WRI said. “Over time, when governments gain more confidence and the community shows it has the capacity, it could lift some of those conditions.” Facebook Comments Related posts:US concerns grow over possible Nicaragua Canal land expropriation, ambassador says A Paris climate change talks primer for Costa Rica With COP21 underway, development banks urged to boost ‘green finance’ in Latin America US inflames debate on climate finance with plan for UN talkslast_img

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first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Four Homer men were convicted of illegal commercial fishing in 2018. The Alaska State Troopers say the men in July fished illegally in closed waters of Dog Fish Bay or drove salmon from closed waters to open waters. The fish were caught by a set that occurred in open and closed waters. The operators of the F/V Little Star, F/V Relentless, F/V Northstar and F/V Wind were all cited for commercial fishing violations as a result.  A 5th vessel, the F/V Maranatha, was also present and used to illegally transport some of the fish illegally caught, according to Troopers. Thirty–six–year–old Paul Roth and 40–year–old Robert Roth were convicted of commercial fishing in closed waters and other misdemeanors. Paul Roth was fined $4,000 with $2,000 suspended and Robert Roth was fined $4,000 with $2,500 suspended.The fishermen forfeited 10,000 pounds (4536 kilograms) of salmon to the state. Last July, the four commercial fishing seine vessels were observed to be working together to drive salmon out of the closed water area towards the open water area, and illegally harvesting and transporting those fish. The vessels themselves as well as hand plungers were used by the fisherman in closed waters to drive the fish. She fined Roth $11,000 with $7,500 suspended and Winslow $11,200 with $7,500 suspended. District Court Judge Margaret Murphy on Wednesday found 66–year–old Mark Roth and 63–year–old Eric Winslow guilty of driving salmon from closed waters and failing to provide information to a fish transporter.last_img

first_imgHearst is beginning to look to its own brands as destinations for more social activity. Through a partnership with Merkle subsidiary Social Amp, Cosmo, Elle and Marie Claire are experimenting with functionality and personalization features designed to enhance social interaction on-site, in addition to what’s been going on inside the boundaries of Facebook or Twitter.”In 2012 we concentrated on, and are finally doing a good job of, engaging our audience on the social platforms,” says Ross Geisel, director of audience development and social media for Hearst Digital Media. “In 2013, it’s about how to make our sites more social and have readers share out to their social networks. We’re still going to rely on editors to have that conversation within the networks, but we want to bring some of that energy back on the site as well.”The three brands will have three new core features that visitors will see if they log in via their Facebook accounts. “Reactions” leverage the Like function and let readers “want”, “love” and “try” stories and images. The Reactions, says the company, are designed to be brand-specific. “Trends with Friends” features a scrolling banner that reveals reactions from other readers.And “MagShare” collects all of the reactions into a pinboard-style layout, revealing trending content across the three brands—also cleverly connecting the three with a network-like effect.  “We hope the experience over time merges into a network experience. Imagine being on Elle.com and seeing something that’s trending on MarieClaire.com,” adds Geisel.The data behind all this will be the “million-dollar question,” says Geisel, but it’s a key reason for the partnership with Social Amp. For now, data will help dial in the authentication process and going forward will assist in adding to the user experience through the social features.last_img

first_img Email How Young Musicians Are Using Instagram As A Music Platform Twitter How Musicians Use Instagram As A Music Platform how-young-musicians-are-using-instagram-music-platform Indie music distributor AWAL, or as they call themselves, a “unique alternative to the traditional music label,” recently wrote blogged about this new phenomena of the new generation of musicians releasing music on Instagram. They point to 23-year-old Whack who released her entire debut album Whack World on her Instagram earlier this year. She made a video for each song, all of which were just one-minute-long, and uploaded all of them to the social platform the day the album dropped.She also released the album on music streaming services, including Spotify and SoundCloud, and while views and listens of her music on her social don’t provide a direct revenue stream as they would on Spotify and Apple Music, social media (and SoundCloud) allows artists like her to take distribution into their own hands. Her approach makes a lot of sense when you take into consideration the fact that Spotify’s algorithms tend to favor male artists and its popular hip-hop centric playlists primarily feature male rappers.It is vital for younger and emerging artists to find exposure in creative ways to reach new fans. As AWAL points out; “The opportunity cost of a ‘free’ project, sans ad revenue, on Instagram is somewhat marginal, because if a would-be fan enjoys the sample they spent 15 to 60 seconds with enough, they’ll likely generate the bulk of their repeat spins somewhere else.” News A new generation of artists is taking to social media to show the world their art and perhaps changing the confines of the platform as a picture-focused serviceAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Nov 8, 2018 – 6:29 pm The way music fans consume music has radically changed over the past decade or so, and as younger artists enter the music world, they continue to shift the playing field, finding new and innovative ways to spread their sound and reach new fans. Recently we’ve seen a new generation of musicians, like young hip-hop artists Jaden Smith and Tierra Whack, turn to Instagram as a new way to expose more people to their music. Facebook Smith also used his Instagram to release music this year, a remix version of 2017’s Syre. Unlike Whack’s Whack World, his Syre: The Electric Album, is not available on Spotify, but can be streamed on SoundCloud, although only with a premium listener account. Visiting either artists’ Instagram page and seeing the video thumbnails form the album cover is intriguing enough to click to listen—in this day and age, with more content from more sources and quicker scrolling from consumers, it feels important to find new ways to catch the attention of peoples’ eyes and ears.As AWAL quotes MusicAlly; “The existing subscription streaming giants are primarily platforms for distribution, after all, not interaction – and from an artist’s perspective, distribution by third-party corporations is not neatly aligned with the control afforded by social media.”You can catch both Smith and Whack performing at Camp Flog Gnaw in Los Angeles this weekend, which will be livestreamed.How Music Streaming Algorithms Hinder Female ArtistsRead morelast_img

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