Georgia Organics Conference

first_imgWith demand rising for organic produce and the industry growing to meet the need, the Georgia Organics Conference is a pivotal event for educating organic growers in Georgia and throughout the South.Organic agriculture has increased in the U.S. by about 10 percent per year over the last 15 years, according to Juan Carlos Diaz-Perez, a University of Georgia scientist in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. It is likely that the increase in consumer demand for certified-organic produce has led some of Georgia’s larger growers to dedicate part of their land to growing certified-organic crops, said Julia Gaskin, UGA sustainable agriculture coordinator.The Georgia Organics Conference, set for Feb. 8-9, 2019 at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center, is an important event for farmers and others interested in organic agriculture, according to Diaz-Perez.“It has a regional impact beyond the Georgia borders,” he said.Along with UGA research entomologist Jason Schmidt, Diaz-Perez, who specializes in vegetables and plasticulture, will present at the conference and share some of his research from the two certified-organic acres on the UGA Tifton campus.“I will be showing my organic research plot at the (UGA-Tifton) Hort Hill farm. I’ll also talk about research on high-tunnel production for vegetables like tomato, lettuce and spinach, as well as organic fertilization and utilization of cover crops,” he said.Event sessions, workshops and field trips to farms in south Georgia will be offered for conference attendees during the two-day event. Gaskin, along with UGA postdoctoral research associate Kate Cassity-Duffey and organic farmer Daniel Parson, will discuss nitrogen fertility management in organic production systems.“Nitrogen is the nutrient needed most by crops and it can be complicated to provide enough for good yields without overapplication, which can cause environmental problems and crops to be more susceptible to pest attacks,” Gaskin said. “We will also talk about how to integrate organic fertilizers, cover crops and other soil-building techniques into your nitrogen management plan.”Vanessa Shonkwiler, a public service assistant in UGA’s Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, will share marketing tips on how farmers can expand their brands and stories.For a full list of speakers or to register for the Georgia Organics Conference, visit conference.georgiaorganics.org.Full scholarships are available for Georgia Organics members. To become a member, see georgiaorganics.org/become-a-member-today/membership, and to apply for a scholarship, see conference.georgiaorganics.org/scholarships.Students interested in volunteering for one day at the conference can receive a free pass to the conference for the second day. Those interested can email kayt@georgiaorganics.org for more information. Class credits may also be available.last_img read more

Modest Job Market Anticipated for Burlington

first_imgModest Job Market Anticipated for Burlington December 14, 2004 Burlington area employers expect to hire at a moderate pace during the first quarter of 2005, according to the Manpower Employment Outlook Survey. From January to March, 20% of the companies interviewed plan to hire more employees, while 17% expect to reduce their payrolls, according to Manpower spokesperson Susan Cram. Another 46% expect to maintain their current staff levels and 17% are not certain of their hiring plans. In the Burlington area, employers expect less hiring activity than in the fourth quarter when 27% of the companies interviewed intended to increase headcount, and 13% planned to decrease it,” said Cram. “Employers are more optimistic about hiring than they were a year ago when 13% of companies surveyed thought employment increases were likely and 17% intended to cut back.” For the coming quarter, job prospects appear best in Non-Durable Goods Manufacturing, Wholesale/Retail Trade and Finance/Insurance/Real Estate. Employers in Education plan to reduce staffing levels, while those in Durable Goods Manufacturing and Services voice mixed hiring intentions. Hiring in Construction, Transportation/Public Utilities and Public Administration is expected to remain unchanged.National results of the Manpower Employment Outlook Survey for the first quarter of 2005 predict a slight boost in the hiring pace. Of the 16,000 U.S. employers that were surveyed, 24% anticipate and increase in hiring activity for the first quarter, while 10% expect to decrease staff levels. Fifty-nine percent of employers surveyed foresee no change in job prospects, and 7% are unsure of their hiring plans. When seasonal variations are removed from the data, the outlook for the first three months of 2005 reveals that employer confidence is expected to inch upward from last quarter and improve greatly from a year ago.last_img read more

Via Cheese To Buy Lucille Farms

first_imgAugust 8, 2006Via Cheese To Buy Lucille FarmsSwanton Vermont&Via Cheese, LLC announced today that it has agreed to buy the assets of Lucille Farms, a Swanton based manufacturer of mozzarella cheese which ceased operations in October of 2005. Via intends to restart the plant in October of this year and plans to make mozzarella and other Italian cheeses at the facility. Via is a sister company of Franklin Foods, which annually makes approximately 25,000,000 lbs of cream cheese products in its plant located in Enosburg Falls, Vermont.According to Jon Gutknecht, CEO of Via, This plant will be the perfect partner for our cream cheese operation and we plan to restore the plant to full scale production of premium mozzarella cheese in the coming months. Gutknecht, who is also CEO of Franklin Foods, stated that Via is an independent concern and will be operated as a separate company from Franklin Foods. He expects the two companies to work closely together to pursue joint efficiencies. The relationship will give Via Cheese immediate access to Franklin Foods national network of customers, distributors and cheese brokers. Via Cheese plans to establish mozzarella production by mid October and sell, initially, under the Lucille Farms brand. A plant expansion and production modernization project will begin in October with a planned completion in March 2007.Gutknecht noted that Franklin Foods corporate mission is to, Re-invent Cream Cheese and confirmed that the Company has recently been awarded a patent for its Yogurt Cream Cheese and has numerous patents pending for various innovations. He added, Franklin has recently used its technology to partner with several large branded manufacturers and several of the countrys leading grocery chains to make leading edge, modern cream cheese on trend with todays American consumer. In the same vein, Via Cheese will follow a strategy of innovation and invention to create high quality mozzarella cheese and other Italian specialties including Provolone, Asiago, and Fontina. Via will invite experienced members of the former Lucille Farms to join the team.Via is owned by the stockholders of Franklin Foods together with Erik Brue of Burlington, Vermont who will serve as President of Via Cheese. As Brue described his goals, The highest priority is restoring the plant to commercial scale production. He has begun the hiring process for production employees and will shortly begin a search for a plant manager. Via intends to retain the services of the team, which has kept the plant in operating order during the shutdown. Brue acknowledged that the company has ambitious goals but added that he believes, Via can be a leading manufacturer of premium mozzarella and the leading innovator in other Italian cheeses. It is an exciting mission which will be challenging but also fun.At former levels of production the plant used in excess of 150,000,000 lbs of milk, (or its equivalent) a year and was the second largest customer of the St. Albans Coop. The plant consumed approximately 6% of the milk produced in Vermont and about 12% of Franklin Countys production. The Chairman of Via, Nordahl Brue, who has been working with the St Albans Coop to secure milk supplies for the venture stated, Restoring this plant to production is very important to the economy of Vermont, and particularly important to the residents and farmers of Franklin County.The announcement followed a public auction Tuesday at which UPS Capital Business Credit, a secured creditor of Lucille Farms, Inc and Lucille Farms of Vermont, Inc, bought the factory and real estate formerly owned by Lucille. The closing of the Lucille plant last year changed the balance of milk processors locally and the state of Vermont has targeted high volume dairy manufacturers who are significant users of milk and milk solids to balance supply and demand. It is expected that this venture will advance the States objective in a very substantial manner. -30-For further information contact Erik Brue at (802) 868-7301last_img read more

President Bill Clinton singles out Bennington College at inaguration of Clinton Global Initiative Universtiy

first_imgPresident Bill Clinton singles out Bennington College at inauguration of Clinton Global Initiative UniversityPresident Bill Clinton invited the President of Bennington College, Elizabeth Coleman, to join him at a March 15, 2008 press conference where he will inaugurate the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI-U). The University, part of the Clinton Global Initiative, is a new venture that will challenge college students and universities to tackle global problems with innovative solutions. Bennington College, specifically, plans to address six global challenges-economics and equity, the environment and sustainability, health, sustaining democratic governance, education, and the appropriate and inappropriate use of force. The institution will accomplish this by engaging a faculty that includes activists, politicians, scholars, scientists, and artists; building a major new green facility, and creating a curriculum that intellectually demands the diversity of perspectives required for students tackle these critical challenges.An Inagural CGI-U event was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, from March 15-18, 2008. Twenty-three institutions in addition to Benningtonincluding Brown, Cornell, Hobart and William Smith, Rice University, Tufts, Tulane, the University of Colorado, and the University of Vermontparticipated, and Tulane University hosted the event.last_img read more

VAB honors Vermont commercial of the year winners

first_imgRutland radio station WDVT and Colchester television station WVNY won top honors in the 2009 Vermont Association of Broadcasters “Commercial of the Year” competition.More than 160 entries were received from radio stations, television stations and advertising agencies around Vermont. The awards were presented earlier this month at the VAB Convention at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Montpelier.WDVT won the first-place award in the radio station “Best Commercial” category for a commercial it produced for Farrell Distributing entitled “Bud American Ale.” The commercial also took home the “Best in Show” award for radio.In the television competition, WVNY won first place in the “Best Commercial” category for “Busy Dogs,” a commercial it produced for Small Dog Electronics. The commercial also earned WVNY the overall “Best in Show” award for TV commercials.Burlington advertising agency Shadow Productions won three radio awards and one television award, including the runner-up “Best in Show” awards in both categories.WDVT is part of the Catamount Radio Group in Rutland. Overall, the station group won top honors in five different radio categories, as well as winning the radio “Best in Show” award.WCAX won three first place trophies in the television competition and WPTZ took home top honors in two categories. WFFF, which is owned by the same group that owns WVNY, also won top honors in one category.Other radio station winners included WYKR in Wells River, WIZN in Burlington and WSTJ in St. Johnsbury.Other advertising agencies winning first-place trophies included Marketing Partners of Burlington, Mt. Mansfield Media of Colchester and Verde Group Films of Burlington.The judging was done by a ten-person team assembled by Champlain College communications professor Nancy Kerr.Here is the complete list of winners:BEST PRODUCED RADIO COMMERCIAL, AGENCY-PRODUCED:SHADOW PRODUCTIONSCLIENT: CHAMPLAIN VALLEY FAIR SPOT TITLE: NEW DEFINITION OF FUN WRITER: MATT DUGAN PRODUCER: ROB OSTRANDER TALENT: RUTH WALLMAN, KEN WOLVINGTONBEST PRODUCED RADIO COMMERCIAL, STATION-PRODCUED: WSYBCLIENT: ELEGANT FLOWERS SPOT TITLE: ANSWERING MACHINE WRITER: DAVE RICARD, PRODUCER: THAD MONTEIRO TALENT: DEBBIE GREMBOWICZ, THAD MONTEIROFUNNIEST COMMERCIAL, AGENCY-PRODUCED: SHADOW PRODUCTIONSCLIENT: NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATIONSPOT TITLE:  ROBOT DOG WRITER: KAZA ASSOCIATES  PRODUCER: ALEX BALL TALENT: EMILY LYONS, PAUL KAZAFUNNIEST COMMERCIAL, STATION-PRODUCED: WYKR CLIENT: FAIRLEE FEED SPOT TITLE: SNOW SHOVELS WRITER: JOHN DITCHEOS, PATRICIA STEBBINSPRODUCER: JOE LETTER, MERL GRABOWSKI TALENT: JOHN DITCHEOS, PATRICIA STEBBINSBEST COMMERCIAL, AGENCY-PRODUCED: SHADOW PRODUCTIONSCLIENT: PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF NNESPOT TITLE: DON’T DO IT WRITER: PLANNED PARENTHOOD NNEPRODUCER: SHADOW PRODUCTIONS TALENT: ALLISON DAVIS, ALEX BALL, GERI ANN HIGGINSBEST COMMERCIAL, STATION-PRODUCED: WDVTCLIENT: FARRELL DISTRIBUTINGSPOT TITLE: BUD AMERICAN ALE WRITTEN BY GLEN NOVAK, PRODUCED BY THAD MONTEIRO TALENT: THAD MONTEIROBEST PRODCUED PROMO, STATION-PRODUCED: WJJRPROMO TITLE: 80’S NEW YEAR’S EVE WRITTEN BY CARRIE ALLEN AND BRIAN COLLAMOREPRODUCED BY JAMES EMMONS TALENT: JAMES EMMONSFUNNIEST PROMO, STATION-PRODUCED: WZRTPROMO TITLE: EAT AND GET GAS WRITTEN BY AMNDA BEGINS AND JD REDMANPRODUCED BY FRANK GONZALES TALENT: SEAN CALDWELLBEST PROMO, STATION-PRODUCED: WIZNPROMO TITLE: METALLICA ROCKS D.C. WRITTEN BY MATT GRASSO, PRODUCED BY PETE POWERS TALENT: VIC CORROLLABEST PRODUCED PSA, STATION-PRODUCED: WJJR PSA TITLE: DRUNK DRIVING WRITTEN BY CAMMY AUDIA, PRODUCED BY CAMMY AUDIA TALENT: CAMMY AUDIABEST PSA, STATION-PRODUCED: WSTJPSA TITLE: CATHOLIC SCHOOL WEEK WRITTEN BY JANET EDMONDSON, PRODUCED BY MIKE COHEN TALENT: GOOD SHEPHERD SCHOOLTV AWARDSBEST PRODUCED COMMERCIAL, AGENCY-PRODUCED:  MARKETING PARTNERSCLIENT: VERMONT HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM SPOT TITLE: FORGET SOMETHING? WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY MARKETING PARTNERSTALENT: OLIVER WAITE, LOUGHLIN NEUERT, GERI ANN HIGGINSBEST PRODUCED COMMERCIAL, STATION:  WPTZCLIENT: ECHO SCIENCE CENTERSPOT TITLE: BODY LANGUAGEWRITTEN BY STEVE LEIBMAN, PRODUCED BY DAVE FLEMING TALENT: MARTY MORANFUNNIEST COMMERCIAL, AGENCY-PRODUCED: SHADOW PRODUCTIONSCLIENT: CITY MARKETSPOT TITLE: PINCH WRITTEN BY MATT DUGAN, PRODUCED BY DOUG LANG TALENT: DOUG LANGFUNNIEST COMMERCIAL, STATION-PRODUCED: WFFF CLIENT: SMALL DOG ELECTRONICS SPOT TITLE: BLOOPERS WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY ANDY BRUMBAUGH TALENT: DON MAYERBEST COMMERCIAL, AGENCY-PRODUCED: THE VERDE GROUPCLIENT: THE NATURAL DENTISTSPOT TITLE: AWAKEN WRITTEN BY ARENA PARTNERS, PRODCUED BY DENIS O’BRIEN AND ISELA MARIN O’BRIEN. TALENT: KAREN HUTTONBEST COMMERCIAL, STATION-PRODUCED:WVNYCLIENT: SMALL DOG ELECTRONICSSPOT TITLE: BUSY DOGSWRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY ANDY BRUMBAUGHTALENT: DON MAYERBEST PROMO, STATION-PRODUCED: WCAXPROMO TITLE: DESTINATION RECREATION WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY THEA LEWISEDITED BY DAN BURKEBEST PRODUCED PSA: WCAXPSA TITLE: FESTIVAL OF FOOLS WRITTEN AND PRODCUED BY TARA PEREIRA, EDITED BY DAN BURKE. TALENT: TIM KAVANAGHFUNNIEST PSA: WCAXPSA TITLE: PENGUIN PLUNGE WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY THEA LEWISEDITED BY DAN BURKEBEST PSA, AGENCY-PRODUCED: MT. MANSFIELD MEDIACLIENT: VT DEPT. OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIESPSA TITLE: PROJECT FAMILY WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY MT. MANSFIELD MEDIABEST PSA, STATION-PRODUCED:WPTZCAMPAIGN TO PREVENT CHILD ABUSEPSA TITLE: WALK FOR CHILDREN WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY JUSTIN VANCOURTALENT: GABRIELLE KOMOROWSKIBEST IN SHOW FOR RADIO, RUNNER-UP: SHADOW PRODUCTIONSCLIENT: CHAMPLAIN VALLEY FAIR SPOT TITLE: NEW DEFINITION OF FUN WRITER: MATT DUGAN PRODUCER: ROB OSTRANDER TALENT: RUTH WALLMAN, KEN WOLVINGTONBEST IN SHOW FOR RADIO, FIRST PLACE: WDVTCLIENT: FARRELL DISTRIBUTINGSPOT TITLE: BUD AMERICAN ALE WRITTEN BY GLEN NOVAK, PRODUCED BY THAD MONTEIRO TALENT: THAD MONTEIROBEST IN SHOW FOR TV, RUNNER-UP: SHADOW PRODUCTIONSCLIENT: CITY MARKETSPOT TITLE: PINCHWRITTEN BY MATT DUGAN, PRODUCED BY DOUG LANG TALENT: DOUG LANGBEST IN SHOW FOR TV, FIRST PLACE: WVNYCLIENT: SMALL DOG ELECTRONICSSPOT TITLE: BUSY DOGS WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY ANDY BRUMBAUGHTALENT: DON MAYERlast_img read more

Verizon Wireless supports law to ban texting while driving

first_imgVerizon Wireless Executive Director for State Public Policy, Daniel Mullin, said the company supports efforts by the state of Vermont to ban texting and e-mailing while driving.Mullin made the following statement today:“Verizon Wireless commends Governor Douglas and the Vermont General Assembly for supporting a law to not text and drive. With the issue of texting and driving on the minds of many Americans lately, we appreciate the support of the Vermont Legislature on this issue and their efforts in addressing it during this legislative session. As the largest wireless service provider, last year we launched a national ad campaign to bring forth this same message. Drivers must stay focused on the road ahead to ensure safety for others and themselves.”To learn more about the Verizon Wireless “Don’t Text and Drive” campaign, visit http://aboutus.vzw.com/wirelessissues/driving.html(link is external)About Verizon WirelessVerizon Wireless operates the nation’s most reliable and largest wireless voice and 3G data network, serving more than 91 million customers. Headquartered in Basking Ridge, N.J., with 83,000 employees nationwide, Verizon Wireless is a joint venture of Verizon Communications (NYSE: VZ) and Vodafone (NASDAQ and LSE: VOD). For more information, visit www.verizonwireless.com(link is external). To preview and request broadcast-quality video footage and high-resolution stills of Verizon Wireless operations, log on to the Verizon Wireless Multimedia Library at www.verizonwireless.com/multimedia(link is external).Source: Verizon. 2.3.2010last_img read more

Op-Ed: Wind Industry Lifts South Dakota

first_imgOp-Ed: Wind Industry Lifts South Dakota FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Watertown Public Opinion:There are few greater economic development opportunities in rural America right now than wind power. Across the country, wind farms are providing a stable source of new revenue for farmers and ranchers, without disturbing their existing operations. These projects inject private capital into rural communities and produce new, family-supporting jobs where they are needed most.This growth occurring in South Dakota is because our region’s electricity providers recognize the benefits that wind energy can have for their customers. Not only is wind a low-cost, reliable source of electricity, it provides a hedge against the volatility of other fuel costs, such as natural gas or coal. Local landowners are also benefiting. Existing S.D. wind projects pay millions annually in land lease payments to rural landowners and millions more to locals, which helps fund vital services, support road improvements, and keep a lid on property taxes. Best of all, as wind energy grows in the state, so too will the money flowing to rural communities. Nationwide, rural landowners receive over $245 million annually from existing wind farms.The benefits of South Dakota’s wind boom don’t end at the project site. The wind industry relies on domestic manufacturing and over 25,000 Americans work to manufacture components for wind turbines. The added income, additional revenue, and new jobs are not coming at the expense of taxpayers, as Johnson asserts. While all forms of domestic energy production receive some form of government incentive, the wind industry has historically received far less than other sources. In fact, less than 3 percent of all federal energy incentives from 1947 to 2015 have gone to wind energy. It’s also important to understand that the primary federal incentive for wind development, the Production Tax Credit, only pays for power produced and is working as intended by helping spur wind development and lower energy costs. Indeed, the value of this tax credit flows directly through to ratepayers. Moreover, the credit has succeeded in driving the innovation and growth needed to push the cost of wind power down 66 percent since 2009. As a result, the wind industry agreed to support a phasedown of the incentive at the end of 2015 and the PTC is now set to completely phase out by the end of 2019. More: Wind energy good for the state and the nationlast_img read more

U.K. Offshore Wind Energy Is Cheaper Now Than Nuclear

first_imgU.K. Offshore Wind Energy Is Cheaper Now Than Nuclear FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Financial Times:The economic case for renewable energy in the UK was given a strong boost on Monday as an auction to provide electricity from offshore wind farms showed sharp falls in subsidy costs.The cost of subsidies to the UK’s offshore wind farms in contracts awarded in the auctions dropped by more than 50 per cent and is now well below the price the government has guaranteed for energy from the planned Hinkley Point nuclear power plant.Three offshore wind projects have won contracts from the government in the latest auction for “less established technologies”, which was also open to schemes such as tidal but excluded solar and onshore wind. The price of electricity guaranteed to offshore wind developers has dropped to as low as £57.50 per megawatt hour — below even the most optimistic forecasts from analysts and a significant fall from the average £117.14/MWh awarded to offshore schemes in the last comparable subsidy auction in 2015. Analysts had expected developers to bid for subsidies in a range of £60-£75/MWh, reflecting a fall in construction costs as the offshore wind industry has matured.Developers such as Dong Energy of Denmark, which is behind one of the three successful schemes, are also installing larger, more powerful turbines. The results of the latest “contract for difference” auction published on Monday were welcomed by supporters of renewable energy, who argue offshore wind and similar technologies can become the foundation of the UK’s energy policy, as the government strives to meet carbon reduction targets. Hugh McNeal, chief executive of RenewableUK, a trade body, said: “We knew today’s results would be impressive, but these are astounding.”More: Renewable energy case boosted by sharp subsidy falllast_img read more

New EPA plan not likely to help Montana’s Colstrip coal plant

first_imgNew EPA plan not likely to help Montana’s Colstrip coal plant FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Montana Standard:President Donald Trump’s plan to replace Obama-era air pollution rules with coal-friendly policies got a mixed reception by Montana officials uncertain what the changes would mean for the Colstrip Power Plant.Republicans praised Trump’s plans to scrap former President Barrack Obama’s Clean Power Plan as good news for coal power. Though never carried out, the Obama rules called for dramatically cutting carbon dioxide, a major contributor to climate change.Montanans had expected the Obama rules to finish off Colstrip Power Plant and likely its host community of 2,300 as well, as the state cut carbon dioxide emissions 47 percent to comply with federal law.Colstrip has four generating units. The oldest two are scheduled for retirement no later than 2022 as part of a legal settlement with the Sierra Club and Montana Environmental Information Center over air pollution. Its newer units are offline for failing to clear federal Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, or MATS. The shutdown will be two months long next week. The Affordable Clean Energy Rule does not address MATS.Talen Energy, which operates Colstrip Power Plant and has significant ownership share, did not respond to a request for comment, which Lee Montana Newspapers made by phone and email Tuesday.The change from Obama’s coal pollution rules to Trump’s coal pollution rules isn’t likely to help Colstrip as it struggles with multiple challenges, said Seth Feaster, energy data analyst for the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis. “In terms of the big picture, it doesn’t really change the underlying pressures on the utilities, and particularly Colstrip, that are facing things like customer calls to divest in coal and restructure assets,” Feaster said. “It’s one thing to set policies that try to help, but it’s not a bailout and it’s not going to make power plants any younger.”More: Trump’s coal-friendly pollution rules get mixed reviews in Montana, may not save Colstriplast_img read more

Wood Mackenzie: Solar will soon ‘be cheaper than gas almost everywhere’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:The days of new gas-fired plants keeping up with utility solar will soon be over. But the rise of competitive renewables auctions means profits will be hard to come by, even in an expanding market.Solar will soon be able to out-compete gas-fired plants around the world. That doesn’t mean it will be any easier to make a living in the solar business.“By 2023, we think solar’s going to be cheaper than gas almost everywhere around the world,” Tom Heggarty, senior solar analyst for Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables, said Tuesday at GTM Solar Summit in Phoenix.New gas plants remain competitive with new utility solar in a number of big markets today, from China to the U.K. to South Korea. But that will no longer be the case by the early 2020s, as equipment costs continue to fall and competitive auctions proliferate, Heggarty said.Yet for all that signifies, the news has not all been good for the global solar market recently.The annual market failed to crack the 100-gigawatt mark in 2018 as it was expected to do, due chiefly to a policy-induced slowdown in China. India, too, put up weaker-than-expected growth last year as 14 gigawatts of auctions were canceled or postponed, or awarded projects were annulled.But setbacks in any one market — even China — are becoming less important as the industry takes root around the world. China accounted for 35 percent of global solar installations through 2018, but that share will fall to 27 percent in the 2019 to 2024 period, WoodMac predicts.More: WoodMac: Solar plants cheaper than natural gas ‘just about everywhere’ by 2023 Wood Mackenzie: Solar will soon ‘be cheaper than gas almost everywhere’last_img read more