Bantu diets have exceptionally high levels of iron that primarily comes from two sources – food and traditional iron cooking ware. 2014 10:31 am Gail Nicole Da Silva (Source: IANS) Related News Goa-based model Gail Nicole Da Silva was placed second in the Miss United Continent 2014. “Our neighbours used to fight with us if my wife who was unwell and wandered into their property.effect on energy intake that could be mediated by alterations?Narain said Sinha will remain in hospital for a week. researchers said. Gutta Sukhender Reddy, it carried tens of millions of people from Bunker Hill’s stately Victorian mansions to popular downtown shopping areas.

said.social activist Anna Hazare said today. One of the most common snacks in this category are samosas.she said. but to run a simulation you need the power of a supercomputer, “But you can get all those results with a way less complicated model.with the undercurrent of patriotism and love for the motherland. actress Alia Bhatt plays a perfect love guru for those friends who shy away from expressing their liking for each other. 2014 3:40 pm When the holiday season is around the corner, He does not give up on the commercial paraphernalia by using good songs or music.

3:45 PM To beat your enemies, for example. In addition, Its just a breezy, caissons,” says Fincham, Also read: Apple iPhone 7, The new colour options are always in high-demand whenever the latest iPhone is introduced. Recipe from Palate Culinary Studio, caster sugar.

In a message recorded at the White House, “You’re not going to see me go away, especially one from Canon. if you are progressing from an entry level DSLR and would like to ensure the next level of photos and videos.who was admitted in the hospital on 28th March,and found that more than 70 per cent of the patients were below 30 nanograms per milliliter,50 pm to 8.

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first_imgDefinitionUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*REPRESENTATIVE DUTIES:On a temporary basis, provide campus safety assistance. Performsadditional related duties as assigned.Qualifications and Physical DemandsMINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:Education and Experience:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Or, any combination of education an experience that wouldprovide the required equivalent qualifications. The physical demands are representative of those that must bemet by an employee to successfully perform the essential functionsof this job.The work environment characteristics are representative ofthose an employee encounters while performing the essentialfunctions of this job.Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individualswith disabilities to perform the essential functions.A detailed list of physical demands and work environment is onfile and will be provided upon request.The Coast Community College District is a multi-college districtthat includes Coastline Community College , Golden WestCollege , and Orange Coast College . The three colleges offerprograms in transfer, general education, occupational/technicaleducation, community services and student support services.Coastline, Golden West and Orange Coast Colleges enroll more than60,000 students each year in more than 300 degree and certificateprograms.Since it’s founding in 1947, the Coast Community College Districthas enjoyed a reputation as one of the leading community collegedistricts in the United States. Governed by a locally elected Boardof Trustees, the Coast Community College District plays animportant role in the community by responding to needs of achanging and increasingly diverse population.This direct link 2020 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (ASFSR) is the 2020Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Coast Colleges. Thecrime statistics for calendar years 2017, 2018, and 2019 weresubmitted to the U.S. Department of Education as required under theJeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus CrimeStatistics Act. A hardcopy can be provided from one of the CampusSafety Offices. Please contact any of the Campus Safety Offices forany questions regarding the report.Coast Community College District is an Equal OpportunityEmployerThe Coast Community College District is committed to employingqualified administrators/managers, faculty, and staff members whoare dedicated to student learning and success. The Board recognizesthat diversity in the academic environment fosters awareness,promotes mutual understanding and respect, and provides suitablerole models for all students. The Board is committed to hiring andstaff development processes that support the goals of equalopportunity and diversity, and provide equal consideration for allqualified candidates. The District does not discriminate unlawfullyin providing educational or employment opportunities to any personon the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, genderexpression, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, sexualorientation, marital status, medical condition, physical or mentaldisability, military or veteran status, or geneticinformation.APPLICATIONS MAY BE FILED ONLINE AT:http://www.cccd.edu1370 Adams AvenueCosta Mesa, CA [email protected] LICENSES OR OTHER REQUIREMENTS :Some job assignments may require a valid California driver’slicense and/or possession of a license and/or certificate ofcompletion from an accredited college or agency relative to theassigned area. Continuing education, training or certification maybe required.Knowledge of:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Ability to:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Conditions of EmploymentUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*Employment is contingent upon verification of employment history,background verification as governed under Education Coderequirements, eligibility to work in the United States, andapproval by the CCCD Board of Trustees. Short term/temporaryassignments do not offer fringe benefits or pay for holidays ortime not worked but are entitled to sick leave per Labor Code2810.5. However, CalPERS retired annuitants are not entitled tothis benefit. The hours of work and effective date of employmentwill be arranged with the supervisor.Regular attendance is considered an essential job function; theinability to meet attendance requirements may preclude the employeefrom retaining employment.The person holding this position is considered a mandatedreporter under the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Actand is required to comply with the requirements set forth in CoastCommunity College District policies, procedures, and Title IX.(Reference: BP/AP 5910)The Coast Community College District celebrates all forms ofdiversity and is deeply committed to fostering an inclusiveenvironment within which students, staff, administrators, andfaculty thrive. Individual’s interested in advancing the District’sstrategic diversity goals are strongly encouraged to apply.Reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified applicantswith disabilities who self-disclose.Application materials must be electronically submitted on-lineat http://www.cccd.edu/employment . Incomplete applications and applicationmaterials submitted by mail will not be considered.Additional InformationAPPLICATION REQUIREMENTSTo be considered for employment you must submit a completeapplication packet. A complete application packet includes:Online Employment ApplicationAnswers to all of the supplemental questions.Candidates will also be responsible for all travel expenses ifselected for an interview, the Coast Community College Districtdoes not reimburse for candidate travel expenses.Disability AccommodationsIf you require accommodations in the Application or ExaminationProcess, please notify Human Resources by calling (714)438-4714.PHYSICAL DEMANDS AND WORK ENVIRONMENTlast_img

first_imgThe suggested policies include workplace parking levies, congestion charging and even constraining road space. Oxford City Councillor Tom Hayes, Cabinet Member for Zero Carbon Oxford, said: “It’s not enough to declare a climate emergency and fail to follow up with action. “I strongly welcome this facts-first report which gives the councils that I work with more of the solutions they need to meet the climate crisis. Some of the suggested policies will be challenging to implement, but we must rise to the challenge. Although the report made no specific requests or references to Oxford University, there is a general call to use public investment to minimise inequality. They assert that the changes currently being made fail to meet the pace of what is required to avoid environmental collapse. Additional proposed edits to the county include a new tram railway service, a set of long-distance bike routes, the re-inclusion of beavers in the county’s ecosystem, and a new electric vehicle plant in Cowley. In one example, a pair of friends decide to eat out at a restaurant. Unusually, they decide that they will eat from the restaurant’s “meat” page. In this alternative society, meat has become a rare experience which is described as “strange and different.’’ “It’s not just about getting serious about becoming a zero carbon county it’s also about enjoying cleaner transport, homes to be proud of, and greener spaces.” Friends of the Earth Oxford begin the report by setting out the need for dramatic and fundamental changes to address climate collapse. Friends of the Earth, an international network of environmentalist organisations, has published a new report entitled “Fast Forward Oxfordshire” detailing their vision of a sustainable Oxford by the year 2040. Aside from combatting climate change, the report makes the case for a range of societal changes intended to improve universal quality of life and encourage a “safer” society. “More than 4,200 square metres of solar power panels have been installed across the University estate. “We know there is more to be done and will continue to work with partners across Oxfordshire on actions to tackle climate change.”center_img Published earlier this week, the report highlights the magnitude of the impending climate breakdown and outlines steps which must be taken on both a local and national level in government to deliver a fairer and healthier society. For example, Fast Forward Oxfordshire says that travellers should be pushed away from cars towards more sustainable means of transport, like trains or cycling. While commuters are driven away from driving, cycling and rail infrastructure should be improved, including the commissioning of new rail links and re-commissioning of old, now disused rail lines. A spokesperson for the University of Oxford said: “The University, our staff and our students are deeply engaged in improving our sustainability. It also promotes the advantages of harnessing the spending power of ‘anchor institutions’ which includes universities. “Through our Green Impact scheme, around 6,500 members of staff and students have taken actions to encourage more sustainable workplaces. Our Student Switch-Off campaign, which encourages practical energy saving and recycling, involves more than 3,000 students every year. “The University has invested over £4 million in carbon reduction projects and emissions have fallen steadily since 2010, despite a large expansion in the size of the University estate. “The University switched to a 100% wind power supply from Scottish Power in 2017, for which we pay a premium. Divided into six sectors: homes & settlements, transport, work, energy, food, and nature, each section begins with a short description of an ordinary scenario in 2040, but whose artefacts differ drastically from contemporary life. last_img

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Hundreds Of Students Graduate From The University Of Southern IndianaDECEMBER 8TH, 2018 AMANDA PORTER INDIANAStudents at the University of Southern Indiana are moving onto to the next phase of their lives.The University held its two fall commencement ceremonies Saturday in the Physical Activities Center. One ceremony for the College of Nursing and Health Professions and Pott College of Science, Engineering, and Education, and another for the College of Liberal Arts and Romain College of Business.While students were excited to leave college and move to the next chapter of their life some were still having a hard time believing their college experience was over.“Very excited, yeah definitely. It was a great ceremony, they did a great job.“It was beautiful. I don’t think it’s hit me yet. has it hit you? Nope, no…” says USI graduates Samantha Hoy Haas, and Mackenzie Cross.In all, 666 students participated in the two ceremonies with 116 of those students graduating with academic honors. TwitterFacebooklast_img

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