first_img Admiral Brett Giroir, U.S. assistant secretary for health, is heading a government review of human fetal tissue research. *Update, 6 December, 11:45 a.m.: Responding to a Freedom of Information Act request from ScienceInsider, NIH has released its 3 December letter to UCSF indicating that a contract involving humanized mice might be terminated. Here is our original story from 5 December:The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in Washington, D.C., is vigorously contesting a report, published by The Washington Post, that it has decided to cancel a $2-million-a-year contract that funds work using human fetal tissue to develop mice with humanlike immune systems for testing drugs against HIV.HHS officials insist they have made no decision on the contract, and say they are still in the process of completing a previously announced review of all federally funded research that uses human fetal tissue derived from elective abortions. But the report comes as antiabortion groups have stepped up their long-standing efforts to end federal funding for research using human fetal tissue, which is legal under a 1993 law. And the battle over the contract is being followed closely by other researchers who rely on fetal tissue in their work. The biomedical community is watching the fate of the UCSF process closely, and with some angst. One investigator at an institution with substantial NIH funding for fetal tissue research said his group has not had any communication from HHS or NIH indicating that the funding is in peril. But he is worried nonetheless. “Fetal tissue really is a powerful tool,” said the researcher, who asked to remain anonymous because he did not want to draw attention to the fact that his group uses fetal tissue. “A lot of basic research on diseases would be left reeling” if funding is cut off, he said, naming HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, and cancer research among those that would be affected.Alta Charo, a bioethicist and lawyer at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, says the HHS review, including the imperiling of the UCSF contract, “continues to set a tone in which political symbolism trumps real public health needs. Because there is absolutely no evidence that any woman has ever decided to abort because of this research.”Weissman adds that he is concerned by an invitation he recently received from NIAID to participate in an 18 December workshop exploring alternatives to the use of fetal tissue to generate humanized mice.“Why are we having this discussion?” Weissman asked. “The force behind this discussion is coming not from scientists working in the field and trying to understand and treat these diseases. It’s a political force apparently coming from above the NIH level.”With reporting by Jocelyn Kaiser.*Update, 6 December, 4:35 p.m.: This article has been updated to include comments from Irving Weissman on the Stem Cell Reports paper and quotations from the 3 December letter. The dueling versions of the contract’s status come amid HHS’s review of all U.S.-funded research using human fetal tissue from elective abortions—a review being led by Admiral Brett Giroir, HHS’s assistant secretary for health, who described the administration in a recent letter to Representative Mark Meadows (R–NC) as “pro-life, pro-science.” HHS launched the review in September, on the heels of pressure from antiabortion groups; 3 weeks ago, Giroir and other senior HHS officials met with research advocates in a “listening session” that is part of the review. NIH estimates it provided $103 million for research using human fetal tissue in 2018. HHS in September began to audit all department contracts that involve human fetal tissue. It has already canceled a $15,900 Food and Drug Administration contract that also used fetal tissue to develop humanized mice.The contract between UCSF and NIH’s National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is extendable, year by year, through 2020. (The most recent year of the contract expired late in November, and the 1-year renewal was required by today, according to NIH’s RePORTER database.) Under it, researchers use immune tissues from electively aborted fetuses that would otherwise have been discarded to create mice with humanlike immune systems that are used to evaluate potential HIV drugs. (Such mice are also used to study other dangerous infectious diseases, like Ebola and Marburg.) [T]he Washington Post chose to publish a story based on anonymous sources providing inaccurate information by telephone with no traceable records despite the fact that HHS provided multiple, on-the-record assurances … that the claims by the anonymous source were incorrect. … No contracting official would have had the authority to impart any communication to UCSF that the contract was being cancelled because no decision has been made. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Report that NIH will cancel fetal tissue research contract fuels controversy Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country If the contract is killed, “we are all going to lose the kind of research that is important to fight an epidemic that we still can’t cure and still can’t vaccinate against,” says Irving Weissman, an immunologist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who has long used such mice for HIV studies.But opponents of fetal tissue use say the scrutiny is welcome. “Irv Weissman says there is no alternative,” says David Prentice, research director at the Charlotte Lozier Institute in Arlington, Virginia, which opposes human fetal tissue research. “But there is at least one publication that shows neonatal thymus produces a better humanized mouse.” He pointed to this paper in Stem Cell Reports, in which humanized mice were developed using thymuses obtained from newborn babies who had undergone surgery to repair congenital heart defects.(After reviewing the paper, Weissman argued the technique it describes would require additional invasive procedures to withdraw bone marrow from the infant donors, in order to replicate the method used now to create humanized mice using fetal tissue. He added that the method has not been reproduced in other labs, nor is it known whether the mice are susceptible to HIV infection. “It is unwise to ban a system that works in favor of an unproven system,” he wrote in an email.)Yesterday, the Post reported that 5 days after UCSF had been told verbally that the contract would be canceled, the university received this letter from NIAID, notifying UCSF that the contract would be extended for 90 days, through 5 March, not the usual 1 year. The letter, dated Monday, 3 December, instructs the UCSF researchers to “finish ongoing studies.” But it adds: “Do not obtain or [implant] new fetal tissue” in mice; “do not produce” new mice; and “do not start new experiments in the mice,” unless otherwise instructed. It adds in black bolded letters that this “preliminary notice does not commit the Government to an extension” of the contract after 5 March.The principal investigator on the contract did not respond to an email requesting comment. Instead, the office of Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California system, of which UCSF is a part, issued a statement that did not address the contract directly. It reads in part: In the online story posted yesterday, the Post reported that an official at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), part of HHS, had told researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), that the agency would be canceling a 7-year contract awarded in 2013 that funds the humanized mouse work, and that “the decision was coming from the ‘highest levels,’ according to a virologist familiar with the events.” The Post story appeared 2 days after a columnist for CNS News, a politically conservative outlet, published a news story pointedly probing NIH’s plans for the UCSF contract, and the same day, The Hill newspaper ran an opinion piece by Jeanne Mancini, president of March for Life in Washington, D.C., demanding that the contract be canceled.Today, Caitlin Oakley, an HHS spokesperson, issued a statement challenging the Post’s reporting. It reads in part: Tim Evanson/Flickr (CC BY-SA) The University of California conducts research using fetal tissue that is vital to finding treatments and cures for a wide variety of adult and childhood diseases and medical conditions. This research is conducted in full compliance with federal and state law, as well as ethical standards, and is in keeping with the university’s education, research and public service missions. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is disputing a news report that it has decided to end a multimillion-dollar contract that funds the use of human fetal tissue for HIV drug testing. Email Texas A&M University System/Wikimedia Commons By Meredith WadmanDec. 5, 2018 , 6:00 PMlast_img

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first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Editor’s Note: This is the eighth in a series of articles published by The Apopka Voice in 2016 that were the most noteworthy events of the year. The Apopka Voice will publish them starting today and running until Friday, December 30th. During the New Year’s weekend (Friday, December 30th – Sunday, January 1st) we will publish a poll and let the readers decide on which story is the most impactful of the year. Originally Published: June 15th, 2016The Apopka City Council voted 5-0 last night to  approve Chuck Carnesale as Apopka’s new fire chief. He takes over a department of more than 80 firefighters.“He started as an Explorer at age 13, graduated high school, Fire Academy and EMT school simultaneously in 1989, and was a dispatcher at age 17,” said Mayor Joe Kilsheimer. ” he has filled almost every position at The Apopka Fire department.”“I hate to mention I’ve been on this journey for 33 years when my mother dropped me off to look at fire trucks,” said Carnesale. “Thank you. I won’t let you down. I won’t let the public down. I won’t let the firefighters down.”Carnesale has served as assistant fire chief since 2013, heading up the fire department’s emergency medical and ambulance services. He is certified as a firefighter, EMT/paramedic, fire officer, fire inspector and instructor in various fields. In 1990, Carnesale was hired as a full-time firefighter/EMT. In 2000 he was recognized by then Gov. Jeb Bush as Apopka’s Firefighter of the Year.Chuck CarnesaleHe was promoted to engineer in 2001, lieutenant in 2005, captain and EMS coordinator in 2006 and assistant fire chief in 2013. Carnesale attended Seminole State and Valencia colleges, Florida State Fire College and the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, MD.He has served on several medical boards, and this year Orange County Medical Director Dr. George Ralls appointed him to the Orange County EMS Advisory Council.The City Council was pleased with Kilsheimer’s choice.“Chuck is an amazing person,” said Commissioner Kyle Becker. I know he is going to do a fantastic job. I couldn’t be more happy for you (Carnesale).”“I’m glad we brought someone in from our own fire department,” said Commissioner Billie Dean. “We have the best fire department in America. We should hire from within. I commend you (Kilsheimer) on the choice.”Carnesale replaces former Fire Chief Lee Bronson. TAGSApopka Fire DepartmentChuck CarnesaleFire Chief Previous articleBiggest Apopka stories of 2016: Warrant issued for Richard Anderson’s arrestNext article5 Ways to Beat Mindless Eating Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Herb Weissman You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here March 31, 2019 at 4:46 pm Mike, isn’t it the truth? There is that old saying, “Those that forget the past are doomed to repeat it. I have lived long enough to have seen a lot of change and not all of it was positive! We need to lean on Papa God more and our own wisdom less. Pray, and trust Him for He is our blessed hope, today, tomorrow, and forever. Blessings on you and yours my friend, Chaz LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Faith, I look forward to heaven for that reason “And there shall be no hurt or pain…” Praise God always, Chaz Mike McFadden March 31, 2019 at 8:35 am EJ March 31, 2019 at 2:50 pm March 31, 2019 at 8:56 am April 1, 2019 at 8:25 am Herb,if you enjoy it half as much as I do writing it? Wow. Thanks my friend, Chaz charles towne charles towne March 31, 2019 at 9:07 am Faith Fowler Reply charles towne Reply My grandfathers, my dad, a lot of others seemed to know what the old dog knew, that sometimes a good hard swat is the best lesson!They all knew that and sometimes it seems Papa God understands that gentle words just aren’t enough! Thanks for all the swats…I am still here and still learning! Reply Charles. I have nothing definitive to say except that I so enjoy you writing that I look forward to every Sunday for a new story. See you Tuesday. Yea Richard my friend, the lessons of life are sometimes difficult, but? Thanks Papa God for not molly coddling us . Thanks for the comment pal, Chaz Talk about a GUARDING ANGEL! GOD Keeps us safe even when we are not even Aware of it, often times only to relalise it if at all Years Later! Thank you Lord! The Anatomy of Fear Reply charles towne Reply I agree, you are a great story teller! Thanks Charles and have a blessed day. Reply Richard InspirationBy Charles Towne            The pup had reached the end of the trail.  With no idea what he had been following he had come face to face with his quarry.  Yes, he had reached the end of the trail and it could very well be his last, for the formidable creature that he faced could kill, horribly.  The young dog did not realize the danger it faced.         He had been following the old dog, eagerly watching as the veteran worked a covey of quail.  The covey had been hunted only a short time before, and now, each time the old dog thought he had brought the birds to a stand the quail would break, running along the ground to the next bit of cover.         Disgusted, the old dog quit following the fidgety birds and began casting about.  Near a stand of scrub oak, he discovered another covey.  He began a circling movement to bring the quail to a stand.         Following the old dog’s lead, the pup was also trailing a fresh scent.  Unlike the old dog the pup did not know what it was he trailed.  This was an unfamiliar scent and his curiosity drove him on.         Whatever it was that he followed; it had passed through a large stand of scrub palmetto, and then alongside the full length of an old burned out pine log to finally circle a small clearing. Totally engrossed in the trail the pup was using his nose to vacuum any vagrant wisps of scent from the ground.         This was not quail that the pup followed, oh no. Nor was it rabbit.  He had been cured of trailing rabbit.  If a rabbit were to leap from cover right under his nose he would ignore it.  He knew that his man didn’t want him to chase rabbits, nor did the old dog, and he wanted to please them both.         The scent that he followed was very faint, a strange musky odor, so vague as to be almost undetectable.  He was sure the old dog would be proud of him.  He continued on the trail. Hmmmm, whatever it was had entered a big gopher tortoise burrow!  The pup forced his head and shoulders into the burrow and snuffed deeply several times.  All he could detect was the turtle’s earthy scent. Backing out he immediately picked up the trail again.         He was approaching a small stand of scrub oak and was in the process of circling an old, fire-blackened pine stump when he came face to face with his quarry.         A peculiar, dry buzzing sound stopped him in his tracks.         His excitement was obvious as his tail wagged his entire hind end.  The pup had worked the trail to perfection and he was proud.         The only problem was that his first trailing experience could very well be his last.

         Only a few feet in front of his nose lay a very large and a very angry Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake.  The deadly reptile was loosely coiled, its head slightly raised, that black tongue slowly flicking out, tasting the air.   The snake was telling the dog in no uncertain terms that it was ready to defend itself.         Over six feet in length and larger then a man’s arm, the powerful reptile turned away from the pup and began to crawl toward a large clump of scrub oak and palmetto growth.  As the snake moved so did the pup, taking two steps forward.         This movement on the dog’s part was more than the snake could tolerate.  It immediately stopped and assumed its full defensive position.  Coiled, head raised a foot above the ground, the air filled with the castanet sound of its rattles, the diamondback waited.         The large venomous reptile knew that it couldn’t eat the dog and it didn’t want a confrontation, but what must be would be.         The previous year a German shepherd had confronted the snake.  The diamondback had defended itself in the only way it knew. Struck full in the face the dog had received a massive dose of venom.   It was highly unlikely that anyone could have helped the dog even if that had been an option.  Abandoned, alone, the big dog died a terrible death, there in the stillness of the forest.         The pup, imitating the old dog in a beautiful point, was excited that he had been able to bring this noisy creature to bay. 
He had watched his teacher move in on a covey of quail with such stealth that he would come to a final point only inches from one of the birds.  Then he would hold that point until his master arrived to kick up the covey.         The pup’s movements were beautiful to behold as he slowly lowered his foot and then leaning forward he once again assumed that statuesque pose.  His intention was to approach as close to his subject as the old dog had been to the quail. Another small step and less than three feet remained to separate the youngster from an ugly death.   But he had no way of knowing this.         Usually dogs will stay away from rattlesnakes. Sadly, every year there are those few that do get struck and this youngster’s curiosity was getting the best of him.         The diamondback, eyes shining brightly, drew its head back in preparation as it measured the distance.         If snakes thought in words as humans do its thoughts would have been, “Come closer foolish one. Just one more step and I will teach you a most unpleasant lesson, the last lesson you will ever learn.’”         The pup, as if answering the snake’s unspoken suggestion, began to raise his right foreleg, his body already moving forward. When he stopped he would be within striking distance of those deadly fangs.         Then it happened!  There was a blur of movement and the pup was struck with such force he was knocked rolling, yipping in surprise and confusion.         The old dog had followed the pup.  Taking in the situation at a glance he acted. Charging from the side he struck the pup with his shoulder, instantly knocking the young dog out of range of the diamondback’s strike.         The snake struck!         Its mouth agape, fangs erect, it struck hard and fast, passing through the empty space beneath the old dog’s body.         The old dog, rumbling a warning to the pup, led him away from the place as the grandfather diamondback crawled away in the opposite direction.         Soon the two dogs were back with their human. The man was pleased with the two dogs as they ran toward him.   He thought, ‘that pup’s going to be as good a bird dog as his old man!’         The hunt had been a success.  There were quail in the bag and more importantly, the dogs had worked like the champions they were.         Oh yes, and unbeknownst to their human, thanks to the old dog, the pup would be there to hunt another day.         Meanwhile, back in the thicket of scrub oak, and saw palmetto, lying loosely coiled at the mouth of a gopher tortoise burrow is the grandfather diamondback. After its encounter with the dogs, it had happened upon a luckless cottontail rabbit.  The rabbit was not as fortunate as the pup.  The snake lay relaxed, its stomach full.   It would not need to eat again for several days, and tomorrow would be another day.AN OUTDOORSMAN’S PRAYER
Dear Lord, praise you oh mighty God, praise you.  Father, please lead me and guide me through the perils of this life.  Keep me safe from the wiles of that old serpent, known as Satan, or the devil.  I realize that I have placed myself in harms way many times, and you, gracious God that you are, placed yourself between me and great harm, even death.  How many times have you stepped between me and perilous situations I will not know until that great day and you will be able to share with me how you kept me from harm.  Lord, I love you, and I thank you, please stay with me, never leave me.  Thank you almighty God, thank you and praise you, in Jesus’ most holy name I ask it, Amen Charles Towne is first and foremost a Christian. An octogenarian, author, journalist, wildlife photographer, naturalist, caregiver, and survivor, his life has been and continues to be, a never-ending adventure filled with possibilities never imagined. He has adopted the philosophy that to Live fully, laugh uproariously, love passionately, and learn like there is no tomorrow, is a formula for a long and joy-filled life. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img March 31, 2019 at 9:54 am April 5, 2019 at 11:40 am Reply Great story by the master story teller. The young pup lives to hunt another day thanks to the quick thinking of experience. Socialism is much like the deadly rattlesnake and let’s pray today’s young politicians and voters learn from the plight of the people in the once prospering “burrow” known as Venezuela. If not, we are all in for a very painful experience that could lead to the death of this great country. CSG 14 COMMENTS Great story!It is a reminder of just howGod protects us, even whenwe don’t know we’re in danger!Lord, may we be ever sensitive to your guidance and alwayslearning from our experiences.Thank you for your loving mercyand protection around us each and everyday!AmenThanks Chuck! God bless you! charles towne charles towne Reply Dear CSG, His love is magnificent and each and every day is a reminder that He never ceases watching over each and every one of us even when we are determined to go our own way. You are so very special to Him dear one, and He will never fail to be there for you. Friends and family may drift away But He is and always will be there for you. Bless you dear friend, Chaz I found myself wanting to grab that pup and save it! So glad the ending was a good one for the dogs…sorry for the rabbit! April 5, 2019 at 5:54 pm Reply EJ, The day will come when the complete truth of the matter will be revealed to us and our eyes will be opened and we will be able to see the times when the evil one’s plans have been thwarted by divine intervention, wow! What a day of rejoicing that will be! Thanks pal, many blessings on you and yours, Chaz Please enter your comment! Reply TAGSCharles TowneInspiration Previous articleNonprofits that scrimp on overhead aren’t necessarily better than those spending moreNext articleSeafood specials for Lent Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR March 31, 2019 at 9:15 am Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Reply June 1, 2019 at 7:36 pm Reply Reply NH, A life well lived is a great teacher, don’t you believe? Open our eyes Father that we may see and give us open minds and willing hearts that we may bless all. Bless you dear heart, Chaz June 27, 2020 at 3:26 pm Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate NH March 31, 2019 at 9:31 am charles towne Please enter your name here March 31, 2019 at 11:53 pm Reply last_img

first_img Vali Homes Prototype / colab studio + 180 degrees design Civil: Mechanical: United States “COPY” Area:  1500 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project BDA engineers ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/580798/vali-homes-prototype-colab-studio-180-degrees-design Clipboard Save this picture!© Mark Bosclaire+ 17 Share Vali Homes Prototype / colab studio + 180 degrees designSave this projectSaveVali Homes Prototype / colab studio + 180 degrees design Houses Year:  City:PhoenixCountry:United StatesMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Mark BosclaireText description provided by the architects. A triumvirate team of Developer/Sustainability-Consultant, Architect, and General Contractor engaged in creating a standard plan prototype house for infill lots in downtown Phoenix. Three main goals were:1. Create a prototype house inspired by the “case-study” homes of the 1960’s, designed for our time and place, and with the greatest amount of sustainability possible.Save this picture!© Mark Bosclaire2. Create a low-to-mid cost home with high design, quality, and sustainability.3. Create a design that may be replicated for any typical lot within Phoenix.Save this picture!© Mark BosclaireThe team processed six versions. We tested, energy-modelled, and priced each to find an optimal balance between design, performance, and cost.Save this picture!Floor PlanThe two-bedroom home is designed to fit on any typical lot downtown. The goal is to improve existing neighborhoods by building homes where derelict sites currently exist.Save this picture!© Mark BosclaireThe home surpassed LEED Platinum certification, and provided a blower test rating of .68 ach50. The 1500 GSF house uses about 6000 kWh (about $700 worth) of electricity per year offset by a 3.6 kw PV system for a net-positive energy house.Save this picture!SectionSave this picture!© Mark BosclaireProject gallerySee allShow lessCasa do Povo da Maia Nursery / M-ArquitectosSelected Projects1–6 Copper Lane N16 9NS / Henley Halebrown Rorrison ArchitectsSelected Projects Share CopyHouses•Phoenix, United States Architects: 180 degrees design, colab studio Area Area of this architecture project 2013 Projects Electrical: Otterbein Engineering DRW “COPY” Structural: ArchDaily Photographs Woodward Engineering Manufacturers: Fantech ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/580798/vali-homes-prototype-colab-studio-180-degrees-design Clipboard Photographs:  Mark Bosclaire Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project CopyAbout this officecolab studioOfficeFollow180 degrees designOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodPhoenixHousesUnited StatesPublished on December 27, 2014Cite: “Vali Homes Prototype / colab studio + 180 degrees design ” 27 Dec 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogVentilated / Double Skin FacadeTechnowoodProfile Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar PanelsMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalFiber Cements / CementsEQUITONEFiber Cement Facade Panel PicturaCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemConcreteKrytonSmart ConcreteSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – B-ClassMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Stainless Steel FinishesWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Mass TimberWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityChairsSellexChair – IrinaBathroom FurnitureKaleBathroom Cabinets – ZeroMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img

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