first_imgRespecting community and indigenous rights to collective land tenure and forest management could help avert climate change — and save us billions of dollars, according to a new report from the Washington-based World Resources Institute (WRI).The report is based on case studies of community territories in Asia, Africa and Latin America — including indigenous territories in the Brazilian Amazon and community forest concessions in Guatemala’s Mayan Biosphere Reserve. Researchers found that forests under the groups’ control and management are better preserved, emitting less carbon and storing more than forests where local communities have weak control.In the Brazilian Amazon’s indigenous territories, which cover 13 percent of the country, the benefits from carbon capture and averted emissions amount to $161.7 billion over 20 years, according to the report. And in the Mayan Biosphere, the benefits amount to $605 million over 20 years.These findings will bolster the demands voiced by 300 indigenous women from different countries across the region who meet Tuesday in Guatemala City in the run up to the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP21), which will be held in Paris from November 30 to December 11. The women want recognition of their role as key agents in the fight against global warming. They also want greater access to technology and financial resources to further that role.Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous People, praised the WRI report. “[It] is very significant in terms of establishing the links between human rights and forest protection and sustainable use. It’s sending a message to governments to link respect for the rights of indigenous people to their land and resources to the climate change mitigation activities that [governments] are supposed to commit to,” she told The Tico Times.Tauli-Corpuz added that the region’s governments need to do more to ensure that community land titles are respected and that indigenous lands are not taken over by special economic interests, like mining and monoculture plantations, or even drug traffickers.“In Honduras, for example, indigenous people have collective land titles but [outside] land owners are invading their land for African palm plantations and there is invasion from other interests such as hydroelectric dams and mining,” she said.An interactive map released in conjunction with the report allows users to explore indigenous and community-owned land around the world: Community and indigenous lands in Central America and part of South America. (landmarkmap.org)Benefits of community forest tenure outweigh costsThe World Resources Institute study also found that the estimated annual cost per hectare of securing community forest tenure is low compared to the benefits from reducing carbon emissions and preventing deforestation. In Brazil, a $19 per hectare investment today would yield the equivalent of $1,473 per hectare in benefits in 20 years, WRI found. In Guatemala, a $63 per hectare investment today, would yield $1,899 per hectare in benefits, including economic benefits to communities through sustainable harvesting and the sale of forest products.Peter Viet, director of the WRI’s Land and Resources Rights Initiative, said compared to the indigenous communities in Brazil’s Amazon, communities in Guatemala’s Mayan Biosphere Reserve found it harder to comply with the government’s long list of requirements for managing the land, which includes annual audits and forest management plans. “These communities are not indigenous; they were more recent groupings of individuals so they didn’t have the social cohesion and there were conflicts internally. Also, compared to Brazil, Guatemala is more bureaucratic and as a result, there’s more costs,” he said.Overall, the figures presented in the report make a compelling case for the environmental, social and economic benefits of community forestry.“In these two case studies we found that community forestry adds the highest value; it’s not agriculture or cattle raising or the exploitation of minerals, it’s sustainable forestry,” Juan Carlos Altamirano, an economist for the WRI, told The Tico Times.Plus, community forestry can help reduce costs associated with resource conflicts that often accompany extractive industries, like mining, and others that are non-community based.A recent study by Guatemala’s Human Rights Ombudsman’s Office highlighted mining and hydroelectric dams as the main source of conflict in Guatemala.Community managed forests in TotonicapánIn the department of Totonicapán, located in Guatemala’s western highlands, forest land is divided into 48 cantons that have been communally owned by Maya Kiché communities since colonial times.Logging within a three-mile radius of water resources is strictly forbidden and if a family needs to fell a tree for firewood, it must seek prior consent from indigenous community leaders and only the oldest trees can be felled. The penalties for breaking these rules depends on the size of the tree that was felled and range from planting five trees to paying fines equivalent to $64 to $102.In order to ensure forest regeneration, every year in May leaders distribute tree seedlings from a community greenhouse so that every member of the community can plant five trees in an area of their choice.The communities also observe strict rules regarding the use of water from six sources in the forest. If a family wishes to build a house it must seek permission from the local water committee. Using water for activities considered superfluous, such as washing cars and motorbikes, is forbidden.According to Guatemala’s Ministry for the Environment and Natural Resources, Totonicapán has the lowest deforestation rate in the country.“The crucial factor in Totonicapán is communal land ownership and the establishment of strategic alliances with the government,” said Andrea Ixchiú, former president of the board of natural resources for Totonicapán’s 48 cantons. “Governance and the use of resources improves when communities coordinate actions with the state.”If the benefits of community forestry outweigh those of environmentally hazardous industries such as oil extraction, why have the region’s governments been reluctant to phase out bureaucratic hurdles, implement agrarian reforms and invest in communal land ownership programs? According to the WRI, in 2013 indigenous peoples and communities held legal rights to only about 15.5 percent of the world’s forests.Viet from WRI indicated that many governments are reluctant to cede control over natural resources to local groups because they don’t trust their ability to manage them well.“There’s a real nervousness on the part of governments to decentralize forests to communities due to a concern over capacity,” Viet from WRI said. “Over time, when governments gain more confidence and the community shows it has the capacity, it could lift some of those conditions.” Facebook Comments Related posts:US concerns grow over possible Nicaragua Canal land expropriation, ambassador says A Paris climate change talks primer for Costa Rica With COP21 underway, development banks urged to boost ‘green finance’ in Latin America US inflames debate on climate finance with plan for UN talkslast_img

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first_imgNews Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world North KoreaAsia – Pacific April 1, 2020 Find out more North KoreaAsia – Pacific November 18, 2019 Find out more to go further Organisation RSF_en Receive email alerts July 6, 2020 Find out morecenter_img News “Without independent journalism, this would be the news” – RSF’s new ad January 17, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 International campaign in support of independent North Korean media News Campaigns Follow the news on North Korea The press freedom organization Reporters Without Borders is today launching an ad campaign in support of independent media that provide North Koreans with news and information. A campaign graphic with the image of a crumpled photo of Kim Jong-il is being carried by the Korean news portal http://kr.yahoo.com/. It will be visible for the next two weeks to millions of Korean Internet users.Recent developments in the Korean peninsula have shown the urgency of making freely-reported news and information available to North Korea’s population.Using a campaign ad denouncing Kim Jong-il’s media totalitarianism in Korean, Chinese, Japanese, English and French, Reporters Without Borders is appealing to public opinion, governments, media and international organizations to support these North Korean freedom media.Reporters Without Borders helps to fund Radio Free Chosun, Open Radio North Korea and Radio Free North Korea, which won the Reporters Without Borders – Fondation de France Prize in the “Media” category in 2008. As doubt persists on North Korea’s “zero” coronavirus cases, RSF urges for transparency Help by sharing this information last_img

first_img Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Make a comment Five Acres is pleased to announce its new Corporate Partnership Program, an opportunity for a corporate partner to think bigger, beyond an event sponsorship!In exchange for underwriting a cause-awareness campaign, your company can receive co-branding with Five Acres and attract new clients who value the collaboration between your business and a nonprofit. Aligning your business with Five Acres can help with brand perception, enhance your corporate responsibility and encourage your employees to get involved!Five Acres has (4) key cause awareness campaigns throughout the year; Adoption Awareness (November,) Child Abuse Prevention(April,) Foster Care Awareness (May,) and Mental Health Awareness (May.) Opportunities to co-brand and collaborate with Five Acres include (but are not limited to,) print, outdoor, radio and TV commercials. With a pledge, match, or contribution our corporate partners gain access to exclusive events, custom content on social media, logo inclusion, volunteer/in-service days, recognition on our donor wall and so much more!Please contact Rebecca Haussling at (626) 773-3809 or email [email protected] to discuss all the various ways in which your corporation or business can partner with Five Acres to maximize your giving efforts. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week Herbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeauty Giving Back Five Acres Launches Corporate Partnership Program From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, July 28, 2016 | 11:07 amcenter_img Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Business News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.last_img

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