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first_img Charitable organisations looking for financial support for a community project have one month left to apply for a Greenham Trust grant.Greenham Trust is inviting applications from local organisations for funding for a variety of community projects. Applications can be submitted via The Good Exchange website and should be received by Friday 23 March with funding awarded to successful projects in April. Applications will also be considered for Trust Top-Up, a scheme where Greenham Trust offers up to £5,000 of matched funding against public and company donations made online via The Good Exchange.In 2017, Greenham Trust awarded a total of £314,000 in reactive grants for 127 charitable projects aimed at benefitting the residents of Newbury and surrounding West Berkshire areas. One of these charities was Home Start, which Greenham Trust supported with funding for three projects last year.The Home Start projects have all helped to address the needs reported by families and referrers in West Berkshire, and range from offering support with post-natal depression and providing learning journals, to a parent and baby group care home pilot project that aims to end the loneliness and isolation of new parents and babies and the elderly in care homes. The funding Home Start have received will help to bring young parents, babies and the elderly together once a week so they can spend quality time together to beat the blues of loneliness.Grace Ryder, Scheme Manager said:“We are very excited to be able to launch an Intergenerational Baby Group in West Berkshire and the response from the public has been overwhelming. Loneliness and isolation have a huge effect on the families we support so we are keen to see the impact this project can have. It has been a long time in conception and we are hugely grateful to Greenham Trust for making such a project a reality.”More information is available on the Trust’s site. The average grant size awarded is £2500, with the maximum grant available usually £30,000.Main image: Family and Home Start volunteer. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  92 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7 Melanie May | 19 February 2018 | Newscenter_img  91 total views,  1 views today One month left to apply for Greenham Trust community project funding Tagged with: Funding grantslast_img

first_imgZika, a mosquito-borne virus, is spreading quickly in 33 countries. The virus was identified in Brazil for the first time last May and is suspected of being responsible for an explosive rise there in infants born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder that causes abnormally small brains and heads and mental disabilities.An Aedes aegypti mosquito.The Zika-carrying mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is in the same family with mosquitoes that can carry yellow fever, West Nile virus, chikungunya and dengue fever. So at first doctors were relieved that Zika appeared to be benign. Only 20 percent of those infected show any of its mild flu-like symptoms: fever, rash, headaches, muscle aches and red eyes. Once infected, the incubation period is likely to be only a few days and symptoms last less than a week, after which a person has developed immunity to the virus.Since its outbreak however, evidence has mounted that the Zika virus may cause microcephaly in infants born to women infected during pregnancy. Children with microcephaly who survive birth can face a lifetime of symptoms such as mental disability, seizures, hyperactivity, short stature, delayed motor and speech functions, facial distortions, balance and coordination problems.Scientists now fear Zika may also be associated with a rise in Guillain-Barré, a syndrome caused by any of several microbes in which the immune system attacks the nervous system.On Feb. 1, the World Health Organization called Zika “a public emergency of international concern,” putting it in the same category as the 2014 outbreak of Ebola. Since October 2015, more than 1 million cases of Zika and over 4,700 cases of microcephaly have been reported in Brazil. Before this outbreak, Brazil reported about 163 cases of microcephaly each year. WHO says that up to 4 million people in the Americas may soon become infected with the Zika virus.The first outbreak of the virus was reported in northeast Brazil in early 2015. By September, the number of children born with microcephaly had sharply increased, so a Brazil Ministry of Health task force was set up to study 35 of those infants. Infants are considered microcephalic if their head circumference is less than two standard deviations (SD) from the norm. The condition can have many causes, including exposure to drugs, environmental toxins or viral infections during the first 12 weeks of fetal development. The Brazilian task force found that the group it was studying had heads three SDs less than the norm. Neuroimaging showed that out of 27 infants tested, all had neurological abnormalities.A Microcephaly Epidemic Research Group was quickly assembled to study 1,000 pregnant women with Zika symptoms and no history of alcoholism, family health issues or other factors thought to contribute to microcephaly. (New York Times, Feb. 6)The virus is mainly spread through mosquito bites, but new evidence shows Zika may also be spread through sexual activity. Dallas health officials reported in early February that a woman in Texas had contracted Zika from an infected partner recently returned from Venezuela. New, unsubstantiated fears have arisen about contracting Zika through kissing.The countries most hard-hit by Zika, besides Brazil, are in Central and South America and the Caribbean and have high rates of unemployment and poverty. Women in these countries are being asked to put off getting pregnant for six to eight months. El Salvador has advised women to wait two years before having children. But poor women have little choice over their pregnancies, since abortion and contraception are expensive and not widely available. Abortions are illegal in most largely Catholic Latin American countries. In Brazil, it is legal only if the life of the woman is in danger or if the pregnancy is the result of a rape.The International Planned Parenthood Federation says that contraception and abortion must be included in the fight against the Zika virus. But the Vatican will not comment on whether it will alter its position on contraception or abortion in the light of Brazil’s dramatic rise in microcephaly.Global warming and diseaseThe Zika outbreak is a tragic example of what effects global climate change can have. Mosquitoes carrying the virus are prolific breeders in warm fresh water. Warming temperatures have triggered above-average rainfall, an exceptionally strong El Niño and the most severe flooding in South America in 50 years. In Brazil and Paraguay, floods in December caused 150,000 people to evacuate their homes.Women living in poor Latin American countries who are being asked to stop having children will suffer the most from the Zika outbreak. But it is polluting corporations in imperialist countries like the U.S. that are the most responsible for the crisis of global warming. As Betsey Piette wrote in Workers World over two years ago: “Half of these [carbon dioxide] emissions were produced over the last 25 years, after it was generally accepted by scientists that climate change resulted from burning coal and oil. … It was found that roughly 30 percent of greenhouse gas emissions were produced by just 20 of these companies.” (Dec. 12, 2013)At every international conference on climate change, the U.S. government has refused to commit to any curb on this country’s high output of carbon dioxide emissions. The female aegypti mosquito is an aggressive biter that feeds during the day, so mosquito bed netting doesn’t help prevent the infection. WHO says the best form of protection against Zika is to prevent mosquito bites: stay inside with air conditioning and screens on the windows, use insect repellents and wear thick clothing that covers arms and legs. For people living in poverty in a hot climate, air conditioning and thick clothing are not options. What Brazil is doingBrazil is a poor but developing country that during centuries of colonial rule followed by imperialist penetration has been plundered of its raw materials and labor. Its efforts to modernize have left it with a $270 billion national debt and a steady decline in economic growth since 2010. The government of President Dilma Rousseff is mounting a “mega-operation” to kill as many mosquitoes as possible before hosting the 2016 Olympics in August. Health officials are trying to inform the people about the danger while government troops are being employed to chlorinate and eradicate stagnant water where aegypti mosquitoes breed, as well as spray insecticide in the neighborhoods.The British company Oxitec, associated with Oxford University, has developed mosquitoes with a genetically modified gene that prevents future larvae from becoming reproducing adults. This gene was inserted into male mosquitos that were then released in the city of Piracicaba, Brazil. Only the males are released, since they don’t bite humans. The company reported an 82-percent decrease in the number of people contracting Zika in that area, compared to a nontreated area 1.5 kilometers away. Whether this technique can control the outbreak of Zika remains to be seen, however.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img

first_imgIndiana Governor Mike Pence has sent a letter to the EPA expressing his opposition to a reduction in the RFS. “I believe that our nation is best served by an ‘all of the above’ energy strategy that incorporates all forms of energy,” Indiana Gov. Mike Pence wrote.  He added, “We need our wind, solar, nuclear, natural gas and coal resources to power our economy and provide the quality of life Hoosiers and other Americans are accustomed to experiencing. Indiana is one of the top manufacturing states in the country. Our competitive edge is in jeopardy as emissions standards, like those proposed by the EPA, drive up the cost of producing electricity.” Sue Ellsperman, testifies at Heartland Hearing. Photo by Joanna SchroederA group of Indiana state leaders and Hoosier farmers traveled to Iowa yesterday to testify in favor of biofuels. Iowa Governor Terry Branstadt called it the “Heartland Hearing.” Representatives from across the Midwest came to testify in support of renewable fuels and against the EPA proposal to reduce ethanol and biodiesel use in 2014.  Leading the Hoosier delegation was Lt. Governor  Sue Ellspermann who told HAT that Indiana produced a billion bushels of corn last year, that now farmers need a market for that corn, and that a reduction in the RFS will limit the market for that grain. Facebook Twitter Previous articleSenators Call for RFS RevisionNext articleTight Midwest Propane Supplies Running Up the Cost Gary Truitt “Since 2007, the RFS and biofuels have been critically important to the success of Hoosier farmers and have been an economic lifeline to rural communities who need this investment and the jobs more than ever,” Ellspermann said. “Indiana is producing more corn and soy than ever in the State’s history – and we will continue to be among the nation’s leaders in production.  It is our hope that the EPA will implement a sound RFS that puts our nation’s grain to good work.” In a one-on-one interview with HAT in Iowa, Ellspermann said the biofuels industry is part of the fabric of Indiana, “We have 13 ethanol plants and the largest biodiesel plant in the US in Indiana. These facilities provide jobs for our rural communities and a market for our farmers.” Home News Feed Hoosiers Testify at Heartland Hearing Others representing Indiana at the hearing included Bruce Hosier, Executive Director of the Randolph Economic Development Corporation and former mayor of Portland, IN.; Tim Phelps, Indiana Ethanol Producers Association; Kyle Cline, national policy advisor for Indiana Farm Bureau; and David Lyons, Vice President of Government Relations for Louis Dreyfus Commodities, LLC. Hoosiers Testify at Heartland Hearing SHARE Ted McKinneyAlso part of the Hoosier delegation was State Department of Agriculture Director Ted McKinney who told HAT, if the EPA proposal is adopted, Indiana communities will be affected. “The recent proposal from the EPA lowering the minimum requirements for the RFS will undermine our nation’s efforts to develop energy independence and strengthen our economy,” McKinney said.  “Along with Lt. Gov. Ellspermann, I am urging the USDA and EPA to exercise their authority and halt the enactment of the RFS proposal until it can be more thoroughly analyzed. The production of biofuels throughout the United States is a crucial issue, not only to those in agriculture, but to all concerned with building a renewable energy portfolio and a stronger economy.” McKinney said he expects the biofuels industry to continue to grow and innovate and that this will bring further growth and development to rural areas of Indiana. Thanks to Joanna Sshroeder of  Zimm Comm for help with coverage of this story By Gary Truitt – Jan 23, 2014 Hoosiers Testify at Heartland Hearing SHARE Facebook Twitter A number of Indiana farm leaders also made the trip to Iowa to testify. “Corn and soybean farmers from across Indiana and the country take pride in the role we have played in the development of the U.S. biofuels industry, an industry that has helped diversify our fuel supply, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and created jobs and economic growth,” said David Lowe, president of Indiana Soybean Alliance.  Mike Shuter, a director of Indiana Corn Growers Association, also participated in a panel discussion at the hearing.Mike Shuter“Hoosier farmers grew a more corn last year than we ever have before, and corn prices have fallen to at or just below the cost of production,” said Shuter, a farmer from Madison County. “Now the EPA has proposed lowering the ethanol numbers in the Renewable Fuel Standard, and that would push demand down even further. That’s not good for family farmers and rural Indiana, especially communities with ethanol and soy biodiesel plants.”last_img

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