first_imgWindows Phone : déjà 80.000 applications sur le Marketplace En un mois, la boutique dédiée à l’OS Windows Phone s’est enrichie de près de 10.000 applications. Le Marketplace compterait désormais plus de 80.000 logiciels, et Microsoft devrait très vite atteindre le cap symbolique des 100.000.Le Market Place ne cesse de s’enrichir au fil des semaines. Le mois dernier, le magasin d’applications dédiées aux terminaux Windows Phone a gagné près de 10.000 nouvelles applis, affirme le blog All About Windows Phone. Au 1er avril, 82.234 logiciels, mis en ligne par plus de 20 300 différents développeurs, étaient ainsi proposés sur la boutique dédiée à l’OS mobile de Microsoft.À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?Alors qu’il a atteint le cap des 50.000 applications en décembre dernier, le Marketplace vise désormais celui des 100.000. Un seuil symbolique qui pourrait être franchi dès le mois de mai prochain. Parmi ces milliers d’applications, note le blog, la grande majorité est gratuite. 67% d’entre elles peuvent être téléchargées librement, tandis que 22% des logiciels sont payants. Les 9% restants sont des versions d’essais gratuites.A noter qu’en France, 62.893 applications sont disponibles sur la boutique dédiée à Windows Phone. Mais Microsoft reste encore loin derrière les app store iOS et Android, qui comptent respectivement 450.000 et 550.000 applications sur leurs boutiques.Le 5 avril 2012 à 16:30 • Maxime Lambertlast_img

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first_imgIndiana Governor Mike Pence has sent a letter to the EPA expressing his opposition to a reduction in the RFS. “I believe that our nation is best served by an ‘all of the above’ energy strategy that incorporates all forms of energy,” Indiana Gov. Mike Pence wrote.  He added, “We need our wind, solar, nuclear, natural gas and coal resources to power our economy and provide the quality of life Hoosiers and other Americans are accustomed to experiencing. Indiana is one of the top manufacturing states in the country. Our competitive edge is in jeopardy as emissions standards, like those proposed by the EPA, drive up the cost of producing electricity.” Sue Ellsperman, testifies at Heartland Hearing. Photo by Joanna SchroederA group of Indiana state leaders and Hoosier farmers traveled to Iowa yesterday to testify in favor of biofuels. Iowa Governor Terry Branstadt called it the “Heartland Hearing.” Representatives from across the Midwest came to testify in support of renewable fuels and against the EPA proposal to reduce ethanol and biodiesel use in 2014.  Leading the Hoosier delegation was Lt. Governor  Sue Ellspermann who told HAT that Indiana produced a billion bushels of corn last year, that now farmers need a market for that corn, and that a reduction in the RFS will limit the market for that grain. Facebook Twitter Previous articleSenators Call for RFS RevisionNext articleTight Midwest Propane Supplies Running Up the Cost Gary Truitt “Since 2007, the RFS and biofuels have been critically important to the success of Hoosier farmers and have been an economic lifeline to rural communities who need this investment and the jobs more than ever,” Ellspermann said. “Indiana is producing more corn and soy than ever in the State’s history – and we will continue to be among the nation’s leaders in production.  It is our hope that the EPA will implement a sound RFS that puts our nation’s grain to good work.” In a one-on-one interview with HAT in Iowa, Ellspermann said the biofuels industry is part of the fabric of Indiana, “We have 13 ethanol plants and the largest biodiesel plant in the US in Indiana. These facilities provide jobs for our rural communities and a market for our farmers.” Home News Feed Hoosiers Testify at Heartland Hearing Others representing Indiana at the hearing included Bruce Hosier, Executive Director of the Randolph Economic Development Corporation and former mayor of Portland, IN.; Tim Phelps, Indiana Ethanol Producers Association; Kyle Cline, national policy advisor for Indiana Farm Bureau; and David Lyons, Vice President of Government Relations for Louis Dreyfus Commodities, LLC. Hoosiers Testify at Heartland Hearing SHARE Ted McKinneyAlso part of the Hoosier delegation was State Department of Agriculture Director Ted McKinney who told HAT, if the EPA proposal is adopted, Indiana communities will be affected. “The recent proposal from the EPA lowering the minimum requirements for the RFS will undermine our nation’s efforts to develop energy independence and strengthen our economy,” McKinney said.  “Along with Lt. Gov. Ellspermann, I am urging the USDA and EPA to exercise their authority and halt the enactment of the RFS proposal until it can be more thoroughly analyzed. The production of biofuels throughout the United States is a crucial issue, not only to those in agriculture, but to all concerned with building a renewable energy portfolio and a stronger economy.” McKinney said he expects the biofuels industry to continue to grow and innovate and that this will bring further growth and development to rural areas of Indiana. Thanks to Joanna Sshroeder of  Zimm Comm for help with coverage of this story By Gary Truitt – Jan 23, 2014 Hoosiers Testify at Heartland Hearing SHARE Facebook Twitter A number of Indiana farm leaders also made the trip to Iowa to testify. “Corn and soybean farmers from across Indiana and the country take pride in the role we have played in the development of the U.S. biofuels industry, an industry that has helped diversify our fuel supply, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and created jobs and economic growth,” said David Lowe, president of Indiana Soybean Alliance.  Mike Shuter, a director of Indiana Corn Growers Association, also participated in a panel discussion at the hearing.Mike Shuter“Hoosier farmers grew a more corn last year than we ever have before, and corn prices have fallen to at or just below the cost of production,” said Shuter, a farmer from Madison County. “Now the EPA has proposed lowering the ethanol numbers in the Renewable Fuel Standard, and that would push demand down even further. That’s not good for family farmers and rural Indiana, especially communities with ethanol and soy biodiesel plants.”last_img

first_img SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitter McKinney Approved by Full Senate Ted McKinneyAfter months of waiting, Ted McKinney, Director of the Indiana State Department of Agriculture, can finally assume his new position as the U.S. Agriculture Department’s first Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs. Steve Censky was also confirmed to become Deputy Agriculture Secretary The nominations were approved on voice vote Tuesday evening, one day after the Senate Agriculture Committee approved the nominees. They will be the first Senate-confirmed executives at USDA since Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue took office in April. McKinney, who was appointed Indiana Agriculture Director by then-Gov. Mike Pence, spent 19 years with Dow AgroSciences and 14 years with Elanco, a subsidiary of Eli Lilly and Co. Censky has been the longtime CEO of the American Soybean Association.Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said, in a statement, that the two men will “provide the steady leadership we need at USDA.” “Steve Censky will help us be responsive to producers reeling from the effects of multiple hurricanes and also offer prudent counsel as Congress continues work on the 2018 Farm Bill,” Perdue said. “Ted McKinney will take charge of the newly-created mission area focused on trade, and wake up every morning seeking to sell more American agricultural products in foreign markets.” David Schemm, president of the National Association of Wheat Growers, said Censky and McKinney have strong backgrounds in agriculture that “make them ideal candidates for their positions.”The Agriculture Committee is holding a hearing Thursday for two additional nominees: Iowa Agriculture Secretary Bill Northey, Trump’s pick to be Undersecretary for Farm and Conservation Programs; and Nebraska Agriculture Director Greg Ibach for Undersecretary of Marketing and Regulatory Programs. Home Indiana Agriculture News McKinney Approved by Full Senate By Gary Truitt – Oct 3, 2017 Previous articleEast Central Indiana Corn Benefiting from Extended Grain Fill PeriodNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for October 4, 2017 Gary Truittlast_img

first_img Reporters Without Borders expressed disappointment today that President Barack Obama intends to try to block the court-ordered release of photos depicting the abuse of prisoners by US military personnel in Afghanistan and Iraq.“Given the administration’s pledge last month not to fight the court ruling, as well as President Obama’s emphasis on promoting transparency and open government when he took office, the decision is very disappointing” stated the international press freedom organization.In a Freedom Of Information Act lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), a federal appeal court panel concluded that it was insufficient to claim the documents would endanger US troops and coalition forces, and ordered the Defense Department to release the photographs by May 28th 2009.In April, the Obama administration told a judge it would not oppose an order to release the photos in response to the ACLU’s lawsuit. However, President Obama took back his promise on Wednesday and claimed that publication of these photos would not add any additional benefit to the public’s understanding of the story.“This is a complete contradiction of the President Obama’s January 21st memorandum on the Freedom of Information Act, in which he stated that ‘speculative‘ or ‘abstract fears‘ were not sufficient reasons to justify excessive confidentiality and classification,” added the international press freedom organization. “ The government cannot dictate to the public what is news-worthy and what is not. This is a blow to press freedom and to democracy’s system of checks and balance. We urge the President to respect the court’s decision and stand by his earlier commitment to transparency and accountability.” May 19, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Obama opposes release of torture photos United StatesAmericas Organisation RSF_en NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says to go further News June 3, 2021 Find out more Newscenter_img Help by sharing this information News June 7, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts United StatesAmericas Follow the news on United States April 28, 2021 Find out more News WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalistslast_img

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