first_imgWATCH: Kahne collected in restart WATCH: Victory Lane: Kyle Busch Hart, a seasoned motorsports communications professional, will lead all communications efforts for IMSA following the conclusion of this year’s GRAND-AM Road Racing season, as he completes his current responsibilities with GRAND-AM team 8Star Motorsports. He will begin his new role with NASCAR and IMSA on Sept. 30, and join the IMSA Communications team for the final two 2013 American Le Mans Series Presented by Tequila Patron events. Hart’s focus will then shift to planning around the inaugural United SportsCar Racing season set to launch in 2014. He will be based out of IMSA’s Daytona Beach, Fla., headquarters. “David’s deep roots in motorsports and particular passion for sports car racing provide us with a leader to usher in an exciting new era for the sport,” said Brett Jewkes, NASCAR vice president and chief communications officer. “He’s a team player who earned his stripes in the motorsports garages and extended his impact into marketing and corporate communications. “Additionally, Nate joined our team in January and has proven himself to be invaluable in our efforts to enhance our efforts in sports car communications. Having new leadership in place before the 2013 sports car season concludes gives us sufficient time to ramp up our communications activities months before the inaugural United SportsCar Racing season.” WATCH: Final Laps: AdvoCare 500 READ: Bowyer’s trouble at Atlantacenter_img Prior to serving this season as director of marketing and communications for 8Star Motorsports, Hart spent 15 years at Richard Childress Racing (RCR). From 1999-2009, he led competition communications for the team before taking the role of director, corporate communications, overseeing strategic communications for all of Richard Childress’ business ventures, including RCR and Childress Vineyards. Hart held that position from 2009 through April of 2013. DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – NASCAR announced Wednesday the hiring of David Hart as its Director, International Motor Sports Association (IMSA) Communications and the promotion of Nate Siebens to Senior Manager, IMSA Communications. Hart previously held positions with Sonoma Raceway, the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) and the Cotter Group, managing communications for sponsors involved in both NASCAR and NHRA. Hart named director, IMSA Communications; Siebens promoted to senior manager “The opportunity to contribute to IMSA and the United SportsCar Racing in its inaugural season and beyond is the culmination of my 25 years in motorsports communications,” Hart said. “I’ve been a sports car racing fan since I stood on the driver’s seat and held onto the steering wheel of the Bugeye Sprite my dad and uncles raced in California in the mid-1960s. I look forward to working with the media, teams, manufacturers, marketing partners and everyone at IMSA to build a strong foundation for the future of sports car racing in North America.”Siebens joined the NASCAR Integrated Marketing Communications team fulltime in January of 2013, continuing a communications career in motorsports with roots in NASCAR, the American Le Mans Series (ALMS), GRAND-AM, IndyCar, CART/Champ Car and motorcycle racing. Prior to rejoining NASCAR in a new role this year, Siebens had been operating his own motorsports PR company since 2007.READ MORE:last_img

Related Posts

first_imgYou can check out the setlist from Perpetual Groove’s 11/11/17 performance at Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom in Denver, CO below, via the band’s .SETLIST: Perpetual Groove | Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom | Denver, CO | 11/11/17SET ONE: GORILLA MONSOON > ONLY ALWAYS > MAN WITH ALL THE ANSWERS 53 MORE THINGS TO DO IN ZERO GRAVITY, MAYDAY, PEPPER*, THREE WEEKSSET TWO: BLACK STRING, PLAYGROUND, DIAMONDS ON THE SOLES OF HER SHOES+, TWO SHORES, SPACE PARANOIDS, CAIRO, WALKIN IN PLACEENCORE: PAPER DOLLS, ALL NIGHT LONG*with James Charles Dunstan Jr. On keys with Matt+with “Red” Andrew Johnson from Spafford on keys with Matt.For a full list of upcoming Perpetual Groove tour dates, you can check out Perpetual Groove’s band website.[Cover photo by Ryan Lewis via Perpetual Groove Facebook] Last night, following a Friday performance in Colorado Springs, Georgia jam favorites Perpetual Groove continued their 2017 Fall Tour with a highly-anticipated show at Denver, CO’s Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom. The band’s first of two sets was highlighted by a guest appearance from keyboardist James Charles Dunstan for a rendition of Butthole Surfers‘ “Pepper”.Perpetual Groove Rounds Out Two-Night Run At Brooklyn Bowl With Saturday Blowout [Audio/Photos]During the second set, the band was also joined by keyboardist Andrew “Red” Johnson (who had just finished rounding out his own three-night Colorado run with Spafford at Denver’s Globe Hall) for an extended run through P-Groove’s fan-favorite cover of Paul Simon classic “Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes”.Fanshot photos and video screen grabs via Spaffnerds member Erin Locke:last_img

first_img 14“Landscape architecture is a lot of forms and the relationship between forms and space and patterns, and I think about volume and colors when I’m dressing. I love the colors of landscape throughout the season,” said student Azzurra Cox. Fashion philosophy: “I used to like colors, and today I’m colorful, but here at the GSD everyone wears black. I resisted the urge — but I do veer into the black zone now.”Style and the GSD: “Landscape architecture is a lot of forms and the relationship between forms and space and patterns, and I think about volume and colors when I’m dressing. I love the colors of landscape throughout the season.” 9“Style is everywhere at the GSD — consciously or unconsciously. You cannot help but intersect with it when you walk down the halls!” said Benjamin Prosky, assistant dean for communications. Style icons: Simon Doonan and Jonathan AdlerFashion philosophy: “Always wear good socks.”Style and the GSD: “Style is everywhere at the GSD — consciously or unconsciously. You cannot help but intersect with it when you walk down the halls!” 11“My style has gotten more refined since GSD. More structured clothing, more solids — less prints,” said student Dana McKinney. Style icon: Lupita Nyong’oFashion philosophy: High-contrast, bright colors, clean lines; “minimalist, but bright.”Style and the GSD: “My style has gotten more refined since GSD. More structured clothing, more solids — less prints.” 5“My haircut isn’t very feminine, but I’m OK with that. I’m trying to show people it’s OK,” said student Sarah Bolivar. Style philosophy: “I like being aware of myself as a woman and how people may perceive me. I’m trying to model what being comfortable could look like.”Favorite item: “I’m really into snakes. I’m the year of the snake in the Chinese zodiac. So I love this bracelet of my mom’s. Her mom gave it to her and she gave it to me.”Style and the GSD: “Days that I have reviews I like to wear big earrings that make me feel like a warrior to feel more secure.” 3“Wear what makes you feel good,” said Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture Silvia Benedito. Fashion icon: “I believe icons aren’t fixed, particularly when it comes to fashion. However, and very young, I got really thrilled by Madonna’s style in her eponymous debut album ‘Madonna.’ The mix of multi-layered necklaces with short and cut shirts, tight pants, bleached hair, high heels with socks, and strong eyeliner, was radical. Plus, she was doing her own music and mixing. All felt very empowering and liberating.”Fashion philosophy: “Wear what makes you feel good.” 12“Wear whatever you feel like, but if you have to look nice before a review on 45 minutes of sleep, tuck your shirt in, and always brush your teeth,” said student Giancarlo Montano. Style icon: “Texas. Does that count? I’ve always liked a comfy flannel tucked into jeans. On the other hand, I’ve always thought Marcello Mastroianni was the gold standard for cool. I feel like I aspire to fall somewhere in between …”Listening to: ShamirFashion philosophy: “Wear whatever you feel like, but if you have to look nice before a review on 45 minutes of sleep, tuck your shirt in, and always brush your teeth.” 4“I have a stack of gray T-shirts. I bike everywhere, so anything that’s fancy I can’t bike around in,” said student Aaron Hill. On beards: “It’s a seasonal thing, 10 years running. I always like having a winter beard. I don’t have any scarves …”Listening to: TED Radio Hour, Freakonomics, and Radiolab podcastsBucking the black: “Designers are expected to appear stylish at all times. I get it — you’re trying to build a mystique about being a designer and not a civilian. There’s an assumption that style must permeate your entire being. I think there’s something wrong with that assumption.” 6K. Michael Hays, Eliot Noyes Professor in Architectural Theory and associate dean for academic affairs, prefers to wear “black, except for socks.” Style icon: “Philippe Starck, the — otherwise inconceivable — model of a slightly over 60, slightly overweight, white, heterosexual man with taste.”Listening to: “Kendrick Lamar’s latest album — the most relevant music at this moment; it should be required listening for entrance to any college in the United States.”Fashion philosophy: “Black, except for socks.” 8“My attitude toward architecture is consistent toward fashion. I like simple pieces, clear ideas, clean structure,” said student Lauren McClellan. Fashion philosophy: “I think I like things that are reasonably quiet that require a second look.”Style and the GSD: “My attitude toward architecture is consistent toward fashion. I like simple pieces, clear ideas, clean structure.”center_img 1It’s all in the little details for GSD students Dana McKinney (clockwise from left), Aaron Hill, Lauren McClellan, Cara Michell, and Sarah Kantrowitz. 7“I really like Willow Smith’s style,” said student Cara Michell. Style icon: “I really like Willow Smith’s style.”Fashion philosophy: “I try to keep it relatively simple and always comfortable. I’m conservative with color. I take so long to get out of the house in the morning that I keep a lot of items neutral, and the same color. I wear the same pants every day and add a shirt.”Style history: “I started thinking about style at 12, 13 … I began sewing my own clothes, using silk scarves as belts. I had this cape I made — it was teal satin — with some crazy yellow stitch. I wore it once a week to school and some kid told me he thought I was wearing it just to stand out.” 13“I feel like I’m something of an anomaly here — we all laugh at ourselves because we wear a lot of black. We play with shape and cut, but color is something we don’t see a lot,” said student Courtney Sharpe. Fashion philosophy: “I like to mix up colors and not emulate anyone else’s style. I don’t wear pants unless I’m working out. It’s a religious thing — I converted to Orthodox Judaism. But I’m not very strict on the fashion of it.”Listening to: Fetty Wap, Nicki Minaj, classic jazz like Billie Holiday and Ella FitzgeraldStyle and the GSD: “I feel like I’m something of an anomaly here — we all laugh at ourselves because we wear a lot of black. We play with shape and cut, but color is something we don’t see a lot.” Wearing black can be futuristic, edgy, sleek, chic, or just downright easy, and for all these reasons and more the all-black palette has become the standard uniform among artists and designers alike. For the students, staff, and faculty at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design (GSD), wearing black is an announcement of their craft but, increasingly, color has found its way back into vogue. 10“I’m not particularly interested in fashion icons or in the idea of ‘being fashionable.’ Instead, I collect glimpses, flashes, images. I dress myself as myself,” said Jennifer Sigler, editor in chief of Harvard Design Magazine. Fashion icon: “I’m not particularly interested in fashion icons or in the idea of ‘being fashionable.’ Instead, I collect glimpses, flashes, images. I dress myself as myself.”Listening to: “I’m rediscovering Nina Simone after watching Liz Garbus’ documentary at the Harvard Art Museums. Now there’s a woman with her own brave style.”Fashion philosophy: “‘Next time, it won’t be black.’ But it usually is!” 2“My boyfriend wanted me to wear this hat. It’s a Danish-designed, felted-wool hat. Part clown, part writing cap. Kind of silly, kind of fancy,” said student Sarah Kantrowitz. Style philosophy: “Style is character, storytelling, and making meaning … it’s trying out something you don’t feel is totally new. I like getting dressed up and wearing blazers. I like to play with being silly.”Style at GSD: “This nose ring was super-normal in Portland, Ore. It looks a little punk to people. I didn’t wear it here at first, because I was trying to lay low. I was just being shy. You think Harvard, you think, ‘Dress like a grown-up.’” 15Student Doug Harsevoort: “An architect should try to bring more color to the world.” Fashion philosophy: “An architect should try to bring more color to the world.”Listening to: Beck, Future, The Weeknd, Kendrick Lamar, and Blood OrangeStyle and the GSD: “Style influences my studies at the GSD in the way that it creatively represents my personality. It is an outward expression of my ideas on form, materiality, rhythm, or juxtaposition. This sets an expectation or preconceived idea as to what kind of designer I might be, and helps to give a personality to the work without even speaking.”last_img

first_imgDo semicolons fill you with rage? Does a perfectly placed hyphen warm your heart? Even in an age dominated by the 140-character tweet, the emoji, and the ubiquitous Internet acronym, proper punctuation remains a going obsession. With National Punctuation Day set for Saturday, the Gazette sought the judgment of two campus wordsmiths: Jill Abramson, senior lecturer on journalism and former executive editor of The New York Times, and Steven Pinker, Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology and author of “The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century.” GAZETTE: What type of punctuation gives you the most pleasure?ABRAMSON: My favorite is the period. It prevents run-on sentences. It makes you think coherently and express yourself succinctly. It drove me crazy as the editor of The New York Times when the first paragraph of a story was one long sentence with lots of clauses separated by commas. The Wall Street Journal, where I worked for 10 years, insisted on short and snappy sentences that ended, quickly and brilliantly, with my beloved period.PINKER: I like the serial comma, also known as the Oxford comma: the comma that demarcates the penultimate item in a conjoined list, just before the conjunction: “Crosby, Stills, and Nash” as opposed to “Crosby, Stills and Nash.” (Many disagree with me, including The New York Times and the musical group that calls itself Crosby, Stills and Nash.) The serial comma can prevent ambiguity, as in This book is dedicated to my parents, Ayn Rand and God. It can also cut off “garden paths,” the local ambiguities that can derail readers as they work their way through a sentence. For example, the sentence He enjoyed classical music, conversations with his wife and his horse momentarily calls to mind the famous Mister Ed.GAZETTE: What type annoys you most?ABRAMSON: The punctuation that annoys me the most is the ellipses, often misused in journalism to shorten quotations. I’ve learned the hard way that you can distort someone’s meaning when you abridge what they’ve said with ellipses.PINKER: The comma splice. I’ll even correct it in graduate students’ email, as in I am going to try and outline the logic again briefly here, please let me know if this is still unclear. Comma splices always create a garden path, and they are easy to avoid, requiring no greater skill than the ability to identify a complete sentence.GAZETTE: What type is most underrated?ABRAMSON: The most underrated is the parenthesis. A parenthetical thought can be more interesting than the sentence that contains it.PINKER: The most underrated is the semicolon. It’s the easiest way to avoid a comma splice, and signals to the reader that one sentence is conceptually connected to another without necessarily spelling out the coherence relation that binds them, such as “nonetheless,” “that is,” or “for example.” It can also ease the parsing of lists of lists, as in My favorite ensembles of the 1970s are Simon and Garfunkel; Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young; Emerson, Lake, and Palmer; and Seals and Crofts.last_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *