Bread is excluded from EU’s Nominal QuantitiesBread is excluded from EU’s Nominal Quantities

first_imgA EUROPEAN Commission committee has voted to allow bread and other staples to be excluded from the EU Nominal Quantities Directive.The EU Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee voted in favour of amending the draft directive on December 12. This directive currently states there should be no set weights for products. The move is hailed as a “vital and important first step” towards allowing the UK to retain its system of selling bread in prescribed quantities by the Federation of Bakers (FoB). It wants bread to be exempt from the Directive, to prevent consumers being confused over the comparative prices of loaves. Currently bread above 300g in weight has to be sold in set weights – 400g, 800g and 1,200g. But new bread weights, such as 500g, 600g or 1,000g, could also be added in the UK.FoB director Gordon Polson commented: “The vote in favour of exemptions for staple products was a vital and important first step. There is support across Europe for exemptions for products, including butter, milk and pasta.”The issue will now go forward to the European Parliament for debate, with a vote expected to take place in January or February. The issue is then likely to be decided in a conciliation process between the European Parliament, the Commission and the Council of Ministers. It could take a year to 18 months to resolve. Mr Polson said: “It is difficult to predict how long it will take to resolve. The problem is the European Council is against exemptions.”NA chief executive David Smith said if weights were deregulated, bakers would still have to declare each loaf’s weight to conform with labelling regulations. That would complicate procedures. “There are people in our sector who say we can cope with total deregulation, but I think we are better keeping the status quo,” he said.last_img read more

Reporting in – Gordon Polson, director,Federation of Bakers

first_imgIt has been a busy 12 months since the industry announced its plans to reduce salt in bread and we are already making significant strides in meeting our targets.The Federation has for many years taken a positive and proactive approach to salt reduction. Salt levels in bread have been reduced by about 25% over the past 20 years and, as recently as 2005, the industry implemented a further 5% reduction. The Federation continues to be committed to the Food Standards Agency’s (FSA) objective of improving the overall make-up of people’s diets while also assessing the impact of any changes on consumer acceptance of the taste of bread and technical feasibility.The Federation entered into talks with the FSA to establish what was an acceptable target for salt reduction by 2010, given our long record of success. These discussions resulted in an agreed target of 0.43g sodium (a sales weighted average, per 100 grammes) by 2010. The Federation will continue to work with the FSA to monitor progress towards this target, in particular the review in 2008.Although we are happy to be working with the FSA on this issue, the reduction of salt in bread has been challenging as salt plays such a critical role in dough formation. It is recognised that any change that may diminish the flavour would be counter-productive to the objective of improving diets as it’s acknowledged that bread plays a major role in a healthy, balanced diet.last_img read more

Rational

first_imgThe latest version of Rational’s SelfCooking Center is designed specifically for products as varied as biscuits, cookies, pizza, pies and bread. All you need to do is push the button to tell the oven what you’re baking, shut the door and let it get on with the job, says the company.The SelfCooking Center has eight other modes, each with a variety of built-in baking and cooking processes.The finishing mode includes a process for baking-off products and offers a choice of browning levels. The other modes are roasts, pan-fried products, poultry, fish, side dishes, potato products and egg dishes and desserts.The SelfCooking Center is available in a variety of sizes, from six-grid counter-top units to high volume 40-grid models, in gas and electric versions.last_img read more

What’s new?

first_imgThe 2009 version of this small automatic dough dividing and rounding machine is on the market. The König Mini Rex is now available to through European Process Plant featuring enhancements to the design of the dividing and rounding system, which mean the weight range has been extended to 13g-140g.== Is this a glimpse into the future? ==Close – it’s called the Futura. It’s a two-pocket machine that can produce up to 4,000 pieces an hour, and is now available with a single-phase power supply.== Does it break the mould? ==Thankfully not – it’s said to give a “bolder mould” due to a recent improvement in the design of the pistons and rounding system, according to EPP. Up to 50 product settings can be stored on the machine, with the computer controlling dough piece weight, stroke speed, run quantity, rounding speed, rounding pressure and rounding action.== What else is it good for? ==A small footprint; simplicity of use – it only requires one person to operate it; flexibility in handling a wide range of doughs; a gentle dividing and rounding action; and a sturdy design that’s easy to clean and maintain.== Sounds good, though I might ask a mate before I splash the cash ==There should be plenty of them – EPP’s sales of the König Mini Rex to British and Irish bakers have now surpassed the 800 unit mark.last_img read more

Tiny treats at Starbucks

first_imgStarbucks has launched a Petites range of bakery products this spring. It includes cake pops – small cake balls, dipped in chocolate, on a lollipop stick – in almond, rocky road and sparkle varieties; red velvet, and chocolate whoopie pies, a salted caramel pecan bar, and a raspberry white chocolate cake.Starbucks is also offering multi-buy offers on the small treats. The eat-in prices are £1.55 for one, £1.45 each for between two and five treats, and £1.20 each for six items or more. Takeaway prices are £1.30, £1.20 and £1.00 each, respectively.The Starbucks Petites range differs slightly from the US range, which comprises rocky road, tiramisu and birthday (vanilla cake and icing, dipped in pink chocolate) cake pops, whoopie pies, mini cupcakes – in carrot cake and peanut butter varieties – and lemon, and salty caramel ’sweet squares’.last_img read more

GreenPalm continues to promote its certificates

first_imgSustainability in the palm oil industry is largely being driven by GreenPalm certificates – instead of physical sustainable palm oil, according to new figures from the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO).Its figures show that while certified sustainable palm oil production has surpassed 5 million tonnes, 2.65 million tonnes have been sold, and 70% of them traded via GreenPalm certificates, which businesses buy to off-set their purchases of palm oil from a range of sources.GreenPalm general manager Bob Norman said: “It may surprise many people to learn that most of sustainable palm oil being bought by businesses is through the book-and-claim route. But when we take into account the sheer complexities of obtaining a segregated sustainable supply of palm-based products, it’s easy to understand why many businesses are choosing this approach.”Norman said GreenPalm was an important tool in the drive to change the palm oil industry at source, instead of rewarding only those certified mills with a supply link to large corporations.GreenPalm was set up by oil company AAK and the RSPO in 2006. AAK UK recently announced that its full range of bakery fats and many other standard product lines will now contain RSPO-certified sustainable palm oil.>>GreenPalm trades millionth certificate>>Suppliers step up to meet palm oil challengelast_img read more

Next issue: 29 july

first_imglHalloweenAs you can see from the gore cakes above, scary cakes are in vogue and what better opportunity to let loose your creative demons than Halloween?lDividers & mouldersA crucial element of any efficient bread production, we speak to machinery suppliers about the latest kit on the marketlBakers’ ReviewAll the vital trade, legislation and tax updates, essential for running your business, from the National Association of Master Bakerslast_img

Food and grocery to grow to £184bn

first_imgThe food and grocery market is expected to expand by 20% to £184bn in the next five years, driven largely by the rise of discounters, a new study has revealed today.The UK food and grocery market, valued this year at £156.8bn by IGD Retail Analysis, will expand as discount retailers, such as Lidl and Aldi, grow at an annual rate of 10.1% to a total value of £11.4bn by 2016, compared to £7bn this year.The convenience sector – which includes Tesco Express and Sainsbury’s Local – will grow by 4.7% and is set to be worth £42.2bn by 2016, while online will be the fastest-growing channel with an annual average growth rate of 13.7% to reach £11.2bn over five years.Joanne Denney-Finch, chief executive at IGD, said growth in the sector will be driven by one-off events including the Queen’s Jubilee celebrations, the Euro 2012 football championship and the London Olympics.She said: “We still buy most of our groceries at supermarkets and hypermarkets, but we are also using different types of stores more often, such as online and convenience. And leading retailers are building their presence in these areas.”During this year’s Royal wedding, IGD’s ShopperTrack research found there was a spike in shoppers’ interest in food with a local or British theme.last_img read more

Staying power

first_imgUK eating habits are ever-changing due to tightening purse strings and hectic schedules, with consumers driven more towards convenience food. Popular trends such as red velvet cupcakes and French macarons, have also affected what customers purchase.Despite this, the muffin has taken its place as a popular and profit-making snack in the past year. In April, Dawn Foods discovered in a consumer survey that the muffin was the nation’s favourite treat, with more than half favouring double chocolate or chocolate chip varieties, and 25% voting for blueberry flavours. The snack beat off stiff competition from cakes (20%), flapjacks (3%) and shortbread (1%).Jacqui Passmore, the bakery manufacturer’s marketing manager, says the muffin’s appeal has grown over the years as a popular tea break accompaniment. “Coffee and a muffin is the perfect combination and the poll illustrates just how popular this is. It’s also interesting to see how mainstream muffins and cookies have become, in comparison with more traditional treats.”Research over the past two years indicates that muffin sales are on the up, with overall spend much higher than cupcakes. Kantar Worldpanel found in 2009 (52 w/e 1 Nov 2009) that consumers spent almost £64.4m on the baked goods, increasing to £71.9m in 2011 (52 w/e 30 Oct 2011). The cupcake boom appears not to have affected the muffin market, with sales figures reported for the on-trend baked treat much lower, at around £28.3m this year.The food retail market currently reigns supreme in value and volume when it comes to muffins, with an increase of 15% compared to out-of-home consumption, which fell 12.7% in 2010 (Kantar and NPD Group).BakeriesIncorporating new varieties into a bakery’s offering is what Gary Reid, joint managing director of Reids of Caithness, says works remarkably well alongside its traditional Scottish fair such as shortbread. “We feel that muffins are a high-end and indulgent product, and customers are looking for something a bit different. Bakers should, however, be developing interesting flavours that are not over-complicated.”Muffins are a treat definitely a product that’s quite filling and a bit of fun. But we must think outside the box and create something new and fresh for customers, while keeping to our traditional roots. That’s why we think our Banoffee variety is very popular.”Reid adds that producing new muffins should not cost the earth: “We’ve got to look at what we already have, in terms of equipment and ingredients. Muffins have a similar shelf-life to loaf cakes, so it’s not all that difficult to produce a range.”SupermarketsMuffins continue to face stiff competition in supermarkets from other baked goods, while the growth of the in-store bakery, producing fresh food on-site, means existing product ranges on the shelves need to stand out and be more appealing than ever.Gary Frank, managing director of The Fabulous Bakin’ Boys, explains the key to ensuring muffins remain an important part of its offering lies in meeting the latest customer demands. “Consumers and buyers constantly tell us they want more variety, so we have introduced new flavour variants to the range throughout 2011 including blueberry, sticky toffee and lemon & white chocolate,” says Frank. “Alongside our original flavours, chocolate chip and double chocolate, we continue to develop flavours for our muffin line.”Its activity has yielded success this year.Frank adds: “We have seen a definite increase in muffin sales this year, due to launching a number of new flavour variants. Although cupcakes make up 50% of our business, muffins still account for a significant portion (40%).Food to goThe constant revival of the muffin as a convenient yet indulgent snack is the reason why Isabelle Davis, brand communications manager for Delice de France, feels the company and overall food-to-go market has been so successful in selling the product. “Muffins are still a very strong part of the offering in foodservice, with 33% of all food bought in cafés being muffins (source: Kantar 52 w/e 10 July 2011). This sector has seen a lot of product innovation, with premium filled muffins and also tulip-shaped cases, which give added interest and appeal for consumers.”Delice de France’s approach of following consumer trends has brought success. Its triple chocolate and blueberry muffins, as part of its new Wrapped to Go range, are now the brand’s top-selling flavours.The growth of the muffins market has been put down to its convenience as a snack and its ongoing popularity in the food-to-go sector. Stephen Clifford, marketing controller for Country Choice, says bakeries and retailers should make the most of product placement opportunities. “Sales of traditional bakery snacks like muffins have been driven largely by promotional activity. They also tend to be an impulse-driven purchase appealing to the desire for comfort food, especially during the cold weather. Siting the impulse display unit in the right place is vital.”Ingredients manufacturersWhether it is working with fashionable flavours, such as red velvet and salted caramel, or producing flavours with a British twist, such as strawberries and cream, Jania Boyd, category marketing manager at Macphie, explains why it is important to look at key trends to draw in the sales. “The popularity of TV shows such as MasterChef means that consumers know more about flavours, combinations and techniques, than they ever did. So their food choices have become more sophisticated and adventurous.”Working with existing flavours and tweaking them with toppings and filling is a quick and cost-effective way of giving muffins an innovative twist. “Giving established favourites a contemporary makeover is a popular trend,” adds Boyd. “The more indulgent muffins are, the more impulse sales will rise. It’s not uncommon to see double and triple chocolate, lemon or toffee muffins, which are iced or topped with a swirl of frosting and a surprise filling in the centre. These deliver an extremely satisfying eating experience.”Kristen Girard, principal food scientist at the Ocean Spray Ingredient Technology Group, believes targeting the health-conscious market is an ideal avenue for 2012: “As the trend for ’better-for-you’ foods continues, manufacturers are turning to so-called ’skinny muffins’ to offer consumers treat options with reduced sugar, fat or calorie content. This is where fruit ingredients come to the fore, replacing chocolate chips and adding an exotic touch to well-established muffin flavours.”The firm has developed a BerryFusions Fruits inclusions range to target this area of the market, available in blueberry, strawberry, pomegranate, orange and cherry varieties.The 2012 muffin marketThe muffin market has a lot to offer bakers and food retailers in 2012. Boyd adds: “One emerging trend is to take inspiration from one category and apply it to another for example, dessert-inspired muffins such as lemon meringue, sticky toffee pudding, apple crumble and cheesecake varieties.”The vast appeal of the muffin means it has the ability to work in numerous markets. Its versatility means it can be positioned as an indulgent treat, grab-and-go snack or healthy option. But listening to the consumer remains key to making a healthy profit.last_img read more

St. Joseph County Police investigating two dead horses on the roadside

first_img Google+ Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest By Tommie Lee – March 12, 2020 0 275 St. Joseph County Police investigating two dead horses on the roadside Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleDemocrats encouraged by record-setting Michigan turnoutNext articleVisitation has been suspended as of Thursday at all Indiana Department of corrections facilities Tommie Lee Twitter Pinterest Google+ (Photo supplied/St. Joseph County Police Department) St. Joseph County Police were called to the intersection of Dragoon Trail and Basswood road early Thursday morning, where they discovered a pair of dead horses and some automobile parts.The call came in around 4 a.m. and the auto parts were found with the horses in the eastbound lane.The pieces were collected to assist with the investigation.Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Detective Bureau at 574-235-9569. Twitter IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Marketlast_img read more