New worldwide laws trial

first_imgIRB chairman Bernard Lapasset said: “We have a collective responsibility to ensure that the Game is as enjoyable to play, officiate and watch as possible at every level while player welfare is of paramount importance.”The IRB now want your opinion on how the law trials are working this season before they decide to bring any of them into force permanently. To give your views on the trials, just complete this quick survey – it’s available in English, French and Spanish. Five-second rule: Teams will be no longer be able to keep the ball at the back of a ruck for a long periodTHIS SEASON five law amendments are being trialled across the globe in both domestic and international games, including the speeding up of rucks.One of the key changes being trialled – from August 2012 in the northern hemisphere and January 2013 in the South – is a limit on the time that the ball is available at the back of a ruck before being played. If teams fail to play the ball within five seconds of the referee calling “use it”, the defending team will be awarded a scrum.If the ball goes into touch from a knock-on, teams will also be able to opt for a lineout rather than a scrum – and that includes being able to take a quick throw-in.The five law amendments to be trialled in full are:1. Law 16.7 (Ruck): The ball has to be used within five seconds of it being made available at the back of a ruck following a warning from the referee to “use it”. Sanction – Scrum.2. 19.2 (b) (Quick Throw-In) For a quick throw in, the player may be anywhere outside the field of play between the line of touch and the player’s goal line.3. 19.4 (who throws in) When the ball goes into touch from a knock-on, the non-offending team will be offered the choice of a lineout at the point the ball crossed the touch line; or a scrum at the place of the knock-on. The non-offending team may exercise this option by taking a quick throw-in.4. 21.4 Penalty and free kick options and requirements: Lineout alternative. A team awarded a penalty or a free kick at a lineout may choose a further lineout, they throw in. This is in addition to the scrum option. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 5. A conversion kick must be completed within one minute 30 seconds from the time that a try has been awarded.The IRB is also trailling an extension of the TMO’s powers, with video referees allowed to look at foul play and incidents in the lead up to tries, such as forward passes. In the Aviva Premiership, referrals to the TMO can now go back to the previous restart (set-piece, penalty/free-kick, kick-off or restart), while in South Africa’s Currie Cup referrals could only go two phases back.All change? The scrum engagement call is being reviewedDuring the autumn Tests, teams are able to pick an extra front-row player on the bench to take the number of replacements to eight.There has been an increase in the number of replacements allowed in a sevens match, with teams able to substitute up to five players.The final review announced by the IRB concerned the growing controversy at scrum time. The Laws Representative Group is already looking into issues at the scrummage and after successful trials they have been asked to consider a change to the calling sequence. Instead of the current ‘Crouch, touch, pause, engage’, it is being proposed that the referee calls: ‘Crouch, touch, set’. NOT FOR FEATURE last_img read more

Expect captaincy changes in the Aviva Premiership and Pro12

first_img Captain’s call: Dean Mumm poses for the snappers after being unveiled as the new captain for the Exeter ChiefsBy Alan DymockCAPTAINS SAY a lot about your team. You can pick the biggest name in your squad or you can pick the old-stager who has been there, done it, torn the t-shirt off and moaned about a life spent wearing tracksuits. Whoever it is, though, normally tells you about the values and direction of a side.Already this off-season big clubs have announced changes to their leadership structure. Dean Mumm, the Australian lock, has been picked as the man to lead Aviva Premiership side Exeter Chiefs through their next season. Peter O’Mahony has replaced ever-present Paul O’Connell as the leader for Munster, at the ripe old age of 24. For London Irish who will hope to stave off relegation from the Premiership once again, they have picked last year’s stand out performer George Skivington to take on the role full-time.Staying put: Dylan Hartley will remain as the Saints skipperThe question of who other clubs keep backing and replace is an interesting one. Keeping a captain can suggest a club is happy where they are or what their values are. Dylan Hartley will remain as Northampton Saints skipper, so obviously the club appreciate what he does for their image and chances of winning. Yet change can suggest a desire to become something else. Of course, sometimes a name is picked because there are simply no other candidates.Some teams must be considering whether to stick or twist. For example, London Wasps have lost one of their leaders in Marco Wentzel, but keep Hugo Southwell. Does Southwell remain in his role overlooking a young and exciting squad?Sale Sharks, on the other hand, have lost several personnel. They pride themselves on their grit, so despite the challenges they will face this season, do they keep David Seymour in to spearhead their approach? It is a similar question that faces Llanelli Scarlets. Rob McCusker was captain last term, and with big names like Matthew Ress, George North, Andrew Fenby and Tavis Knoyle moving in and only one well-known player coming in, in the form of John Barclay, perhaps they have no option but to stick. Mind you, there are the instances where there is no evolution or revolution; there is just necessity.With Jim Hamilton now at Montpellier, Gloucester need a captain. If Mike Tindall and Hamilton have been unable to play, 24-year-old Tom Savage has stepped into the breach. He may be the man that DoR Nigel Davies wants, with few others shooting their hands up, but how can you know. There are so many young talents there, anyone in the creche could get the golden rattle. DUBLIN, IRELAND – MAY 17: Leinster captain Jamie Heaslip (c) and team mates celebrate after winning the Amlin Challenge Cup Final match between Leinster and Stade Francais Paris at Royal Dublin Society on May 17, 2013 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) With clubs like Edinburgh and Glasgow Warriors, too, there seems almost no reason at all to change their leadership structures.The next logical full-time Leinster captain?: Jamie HeaslipThe fans will have no real say in this matter. It comes down to a coach’s discretion. If they like a player or that person has done the job through every tough game in recent memory it is hard to stick. Sometimes the coaches do not have time for sentimentality. Look at Leinster. A new coach comes in, Matt O’Connor. He has long-serving leader Leo Cullen with him and behind that Brian O’Driscoll who is set for one more year. Does he stick with what was there before him? It is difficult, because it is well known that Cullen will blow himself to bits for the cause – it has been overheard before that it will be a miracle if the second row can walk when he is in his 50s – but in the RaboDirect Pro12 final the skipper insisted on lifting the cup in tandem with Jamie Heaslip.O’Connor could do worse than to facilitate a changing of the guard that is already underway. Some changes just make sense. Another example would be if Rob Webber took over as captain of Bath. Few would grumble. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

30 Minutes with… England wing Kay Wilson

first_imgHigh-scoring England wing Kay Wilson reveals her fear of baked beans – and more! Who would you like to be stuck in a lift with and why? Charlotte (Crosby) from Geordie Shore. It would be so funny. She could tell me all her funny stories and I think she’d be a really good laugh to be around.Who would be your three dream dinner party guests? Barack Obama – the coolest man ever. Charlotte Crosby again. And David Beckham.Thumbs up: David Beckham would make a good dinner guest. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s been your most embarrassing moment? I got carted off on a stretcher at Twickenham, in front of all my family and friends. At the time I didn’t realise I’d broken my leg, so I just thought everyone in the stadium would think I was a wuss.That’s a bit hard on yourself! Moving on, if you could be any of your England team-mates who would it be? Lydia Thompson. She’s got a beautiful dog, Otis; her life is settled – she’s married and has a house; she’s level-headed and chilled out. Nothing seems to stress her, she’s always really happy, and she’s an amazing player. I don’t have my life as in order as her!If you could have one superpower, what would it be? Time travel.What’s the silliest thing you’ve ever bought? Board shorts. That was during a bad stage in my life! They were brown and I used to wear them all the time. They were awful.What would you like to achieve outside rugby? To own a yacht. I like the water and going on holiday on a yacht would be great. You could just jump off the side into the sea.How would you like to be remembered? What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch? Emily Scarratt had her shorts and pants pulled down in a tackle during a training session.Who are the jokers in the squad? Izzy Noel-Smith is really funny. Danielle Waterman as well. There are lots of characters who are good to be around in the squad.Are there any pranks that you can tell us about? We’re really sensible! Not really – we hide round doors and jump out at people. Sarah Hunter squeals every time!What are your nicknames? Wils. And I’ve always got called ‘Karen’ too. She’s sort of my alter ego on the rugby pitch. When I go onto a rugby pitch I change and people say “Karen’s out”. Kay to Karen – it’s quite close. It started when we were wrestling in pre-season once and has stuck since then. Whenever I’m in a bad mood, I’m Karen!What’s your guilty pleasure? Keeping up with the Kardashians on E! It’s so good.What would be your specialist subject on Mastermind? The Kardashians!Family affair: The Kardashians pose at a magazine event. Photo: Getty ImagesDo you have any phobias? I’m scared of baked beans! I remember eating them as a kid, I must have been about eight or nine, and I didn’t like them. It’s the texture of the bean and the sauce goes everywhere. There are so many of them they almost come to life on the plate.What are your bugbears? Noisy eaters. I can’t name people but they know who they are!FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREDo you have any superstitions? If I’ve had a good game I stick with the same sports bra; if I’ve had a bad game I think the luck’s run out so I try a new one. I’ve retired some and others I go back to after a couple of months, hoping the luck has recharged! Pace setter: Kay Wilson breaks against Spain at the 2017 Women’s World Cup. Photo: Getty Images center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As an all-round good egg.This article originally appeared in the September 2017 issue of Rugby World.last_img read more

England Women to play world’s best in Super Series

first_img“There’s actually a lot of competition across all the nations. We came into this Six Nations in great form and it’s a testament to how well we prepared that we managed to translate that onto the pitch.“If you look at the last round of the Six Nations, there were some shock scores. Italy were written off at the beginning but have done phenomenally well and beat France in their final game. Ireland came in fairly strongly but were beaten in their last game (by Wales).“The Six Nations is extremely relevant. The challenge for the other five nations is to go away and look at how their squads are performing. The onus is on them to up their game and make sure performances are better next season.”Rematch: England beat Canada 27-19 in November (Getty Images)The next challenge for England is to see whether their can replicate their Six Nations form in the Super Series.Match timings and ticket information for the competition are still to be confirmed, but visit usarugby.org/tickets to sign up for the pre-sale email list.Women’s Super Series 2019 FixturesFriday 28 June Canada v New Zealand, England v USATuesday 2 July France v Canada, New Zealand v USASaturday 6 July France v New Zealand, Canada v EnglandWednesday 10 July England v France, Canada v USASunday 14 July France v USA, New Zealand v England Women’s Six Nations Grand Slam champions to play New Zealand, Canada, USA and France in San Diego this summer England Women to play world’s best in Super Series England Women swept aside all before them in this year’s Women’s Six Nations to secure a Grand Slam – and now they will face the world’s top-ranked teams in a Super Series in San Diego this summer.World champions New Zealand will take part in the round-robin tournament, which also involves Canada, France and the USA.It will take place from 28 June to 14 July, with matches played at Chula Vista Elite Athlete Training Centre before the final round at Torero Stadium, San Diego State University.England will play the Black Ferns in the final match – the first time the two sides have met since the 2017 World Cup final.On target: Kendra Cocksedge kicks for goal during New Zealand’s World Cup final win in 2017 (Getty Images)Given the one-sided nature of their Six Nations matches, this competition will be a tougher test for England as they continue their preparations for the 2021 World Cup, particularly given the short turnaround between matches.Related: What does England’s Grand Slam mean to the Women’s Six Nations?England head coach Simon Middleton says: “This year’s summer tour promises to be a fantastic competition and a tremendous opportunity in terms of the next stage of development for the Red Roses.“Given the calibre of teams involved this will be the most competitive summer series we’ve been a part of to date. We will be looking to take our strongest squad to the USA for this series.”The Super Series will follow an historic first match against the Barbarians at Twickenham on 2 June.Harlequins and England prop Vickii Cornborough recognises that there is plenty of competition for places in the touring squad, saying: “Every single England player is putting their hands up for selection for the Barbarians game because it’s right before the tour.”On the charge: Vickii Cornborough attacks against France in the Six Nations (Getty Images)Many have bemoaned that the Women’s Six Nations wasn’t competitive this year given England’s dominance. Cornborough disputes the suggestion, but does say the other unions involved must now improve their performances ahead of the 2020 championship.“I’ve been lucky enough in my England career to win two Grand Slams, but in my first season we didn’t finish in the top two,” she says. Jumping for joy: Marlie Packer and England celebrate their Six Nations win (Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In terms of the scoring system, it will be four points for a win, two for a draw and zero for a loss, with bonus points for scoring four or more tries and losing by seven points or less.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Jacob Stockdale: How to chip and chase

first_img The Exeter Chiefs and England wing explains how… Expand “I have a long stride when I’m running, but before I chip I’ll shorten my stride length. This is so I can get good timing and it makes it easier to kick. Then once I’ve kicked, it’s back to the long stride to chase the ball quickly.”MORE SKILLS ADVICE… Jonny May: How to counter-attack Jack Nowell: How to up your wing work-rate Collapse LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Jess Breach: How to deliver a hand-off The England wing gives his top tips for… Expand The Ulster and Ireland wing explains how to kick over defences Jess Breach: How to deliver a hand-off Jack Nowell: How to up your wing work-rate Jacob Stockdale: How to chip and chase Jacob Stockdale’s ability to chip ahead and chase his own kick has resulted in memorable tries against England and New Zealand amongst others. Here the Ulster and Ireland wing, who scored a record seven tries in the 2018 Six Nations Championship, gives his advice on how you can replicate the skill…Space exploration“The key thing to look for is the space. Be aware of the players around you. If their full-back isn’t in the backfield and the winger is 
up, there is space in behind. Don’t put a chip in if someone is standing in the space.”Clean connection“You want an upright ball drop so it comes down and makes a clean connection with your foot. You want the ball to hit the top of your laces; your toes should be pointing up, so the 
ball goes up rather 
than long.”Change in stride Jonny May: How to counter-attack The Harlequins and England wing gives her tips… Kick on: Jacob Stockdale chips over the All Blacks defence (Getty Images) Muscle memory“In Ireland camp after training, all the wingers – Andrew Conway, Jordan Larmour and Keith Earls, for instance – will get together with the kicking coach, Richie Murphy, and put in chips against each other, as well as trying longer kicks and grubbers. You get that muscle memory and when I’m in a game I don’t think about it!”This article originally appeared in the November 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine. Every month Rugby World features advice from professional players and coaches on specific skills. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

From the French Foreign Legion to the Top 14, meet Tavite Veredamu

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The sevens star has gone from military life to a short-term contract with Clermont Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. From the French Foreign Legion to the Top 14, meet Tavite Veredamu Sure there were days when he wanted to quit. The training to get into the French Foreign Legion is infamous for a reason and by his own admission, the 18-year old Tavite Veredamu had only stumbled upon the idea of joining the French army after Googling around.However, a week out from beginning the Top 14 season with Clermont – a new frontier for him – the now 30-year-old reflects on the yomp to get to this point.“Staying in the village (Nakavu) I had seen my parents struggling, they were looking after my siblings and I just wanted to come out of Fiji and provide more income for my family,” the back-rower tells Rugby World of his initial motivations. “I saw the French army on the internet and told myself, ‘Why not try this?’“I didn’t even know it was really hard! My dreams were just to get out of the village and join the army and earn money.Related: Top 14 2020-21 season preview“I arrived in France in September 2008. I went directly to the base. It’s already hard when you are so far from your family and you don’t speak any French. And the first month and a half with the Foreign Legion you do all the tests before you get selected for four months of training. You wake up at like four or five o’clock, you clean up all the stuff. It has taken him some time to get to this point but his place has been earned the hard way.Now, on the eve of the Top 14 kicking in again, he will be putting his hand up for selection for Les Jaunards. When Covid-19 laid waste to the HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series, French national players were urged to seek opportunities in 15s to keep sharp while uncertainty reigns elsewhere. In a frenzied fortnight, Veredamu went from hearing this to accepting a four-month deal in the Auvergne.“Here I’m really enjoying myself,” Veredamu says of life with Clermont. “In the morning at training your team-mates are laughing and enjoying themselves. In the army there’s good moments but you don’t know if you’ll be alive or dead, so here it’s really like holidays!“I’m really excited. At a club like Clermont who’ve done so well over the last few years, to be here with the big boys… I’m happy.Powerful ally: Clermont and Fiji flanker Peceli Yato (Getty Images)“There’s a lot of great players (in the back row), like (Arthur) Iturria, Fritz Lee, Peceli Yato, Judicaël Cancoriet… A lot of talent, a lot of big boys, so many of them in the French team. Training with well-known rugby names motivates me to work hard, train hard.“For the last three years I’ve not played back-row so I’ve got to look at a lot of stuff, some video, training. For the four months I will try to do my best and dig in. Clermont are already there – me, I’m new here so I’m just going to do my best in training and see if I get a chance and if I can take my chance.”With a pioneering spirit and gritted teeth, Veredamu has come through tours of differing natures. He may not tell us to expect much, but his story to date suggests that the next few months in yellow will at the very least be lively.center_img Running it in: Veredamu in Singapore, 2019 (Getty Images) Selfie time: Celebrating with fans on the sevens circuit (Getty Images)Soon though, the French army rugby set-up saw what he was doing and asked him if he would give them a go. It was at a sevens services tournament, Veredamu says, that he stood out enough to be spotted elsewhere.On the following Monday, Veredamu received a call from the France sevens team manager. He felt shock. At first he thought it was a joke. He had gotten back into the game for enjoyment, but suddenly he was giddy with uncertainty as he thought of heading to his first national training session.Related: The French rugby club 4,300km from ParisIt was at this training he was told to get a French passport and after the army obliged him, he would go on to wear Bleu for the first time, in 2017. When he told his parents, he has no issue explaining, he was “lost in tears”.Described by coach Ben Ryan, who has worked with France Sevens as a consultant, as “a brilliant guy on every level”, Veredamu has rocked events. He has the option, he has suggested in the past, of one day returning to the military. Yet his standard of play has kept climbing. The touching thing is that the back-row seems shocked at what he has achieved on the field so far. “For the four months training they take you to a forest camp and you don’t eat well, sleep well. It’s training all day, running, you learn to speak French. At first it was really hard. In France it was the first time I saw snow falling. When it’s really cold they won’t let you put a jacket on, so you get used to the weather. There’s no heater, you run every day, with packs and guns and radios – every week you would do 50km walking with all this stuff, late at night or early in the morning.”So what motivated you to pull through?Veredamu explains: “At the maximum level when you are tired and you cannot sleep, I’d think ‘What am I doing here? It’s better at home, smiling and playing with your friends.’ But before I came to France, these are the last words my grandfather told me: ‘If you don’t want to go to France and get a better life, you’d better not come back to Fiji.’ So every day at training I’d think of what he told me.“There was also a Fijian guy in the same section as me. His name is Joeli Navolo and sometimes he would just say to me, ‘We’ve got to finish this together. We didn’t come here for nothing.’ I never knew him in Fiji but we started on the same day and we’ve become best friends now. He helped me a lot because we’d share our difficulties and when I told him I’d stop this, he would encourage me a lot.“We had to finish this together.”Pass it on: In action in Sydney earlier this year (Getty Images)Life at this point was very different from scampering around after his younger brother and two kid sisters. There had been school rugby (15s and sevens) to enjoy too, a love of his since he was seven. But he would not touch a ball for at least three years. Military life was full-on enough and there were tours to come.Veredamu would be sent to Mali and Djibouti. He says he did not see a lot of action but that life was still “stressful”, before adding: “You didn’t ever know if you were going to get shot.“You don’t know if you’re going to stay alive or be dead. When you go on a tour it’s a mission – you must go for it, it’s in your contract. You’ve got to complete the mission. You tell yourself you’re here to help the people, not just to shoot them! They are humans like us.”So with all of the above you can understand the need to escape back into rugby. And although it took a little cajoling from former Fiji centre Julian Vulakoro to get him to play with the Nimes side he was helping out, the legionnaire relished taking back his weekends. It was the joy of simply playing again.last_img read more

Ireland back new faces against Italy

first_imgJacob Whitehead looks ahead to the first weekend of autumn Tests in the northern hemisphere for 2020 “It’s been a long time and the players are excited. We can’t wait now. It’s a game to get us back into our stride.” Head coach Wayne Pivac discusses key talking from today’s team announcement. #FRAvWAL ⑊ #HWFN pic.twitter.com/vku2HLRtdZ— Welsh Rugby Union (@WelshRugbyUnion) October 22, 2020Some had thought Pivac may use the France game as an opportunity to experiment, but the former Scarlets boss has gone with experience – Alun Wyn Jones, Justin Tipuric, Taulupe Faletau, Dan Biggar, Jonathan Davies, George North and Leigh Halfpenny all start.Davies, who is back after a long-term knee injury, is forming a new centre pairing with Nick Tompkins, which is sure to excite Welsh fans.The big news though? Louis Rees-Zammit is set to be given his first taste of Test rugby having been named on the bench. It’s a good thing this game isn’t under the roof in Cardiff – things might just get a little too hot with the Gloucester man’s searing speed. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ireland back new faces against ItalyInternational rugby is back in the northern hemisphere! The next two weeks will see the Six Nations finally finished – a competition which began on the 1 February and will see its champion crowned on Halloween. There could have been babies conceived, born and picked as an apprentice by Eddie Jones in that timeframe.And then it’s out with the old and in with the new as the inaugural Autumn Nations Cup kicks off, with Fiji and Georgia coming into the mix for four straight weeks of Tests.This first weekend of rugby is a bit of a strange one, with one Six Nations fixture mingling with friendlies, but there’s still plenty to be looking forward to as Test rugby kicks off once again…Ireland back new faces against Italy Ireland v Italy, 3.30pm, Saturday 24 October, Aviva Stadium, Live on ITVSpring is usually the time to freshen up, but Andy Farrell resisted the temptation to make any wholesale changes from the Joe Schmidt era back in February. His first game in charge, a 19-12 win over Scotland, saw only the debuts of No 8 Caelan Doris, who was unfortunate to go off early with a head injury, and hooker Ronan Kelleher, who was a late introduction off the bench.In contrast, Saturday afternoon’s Six Nations game against Italy in Dublin has seen a raft of players given a chance, with Leinster players in particular rewarded for rich provincial form.Hugo Keenan, fresh from beating Beauden Barrett’s bronco during lockdown, starts on the left wing. A graduate of Ireland’s sevens programme, his pace is almost as impressive as his rugby nous – he reminds me of Australia’s Dane Haylett-Petty.Powerful openside Will Connors will make his debut alongside Doris and CJ Stander in a back row that is an impressive carrying unit.Without wanting to get drawn into a debate on rugby’s residency rules, by far the most controversial selection decisions have taken place at half-back. Ulster’s John Cooney didn’t make Farrell’s squad for the autumn after a drop in provincial form. His replacement is Jamison Gibson-Park, who has represented the Maori All Blacks and is selected on the bench for this match ahead of Leinster team-mate Luke McGrath.There are a couple of other interesting selections in the Irish team. Jacob Stockdale will fill in at full-back after Jordan Larmour’s injury, while Tadhg Beirne is given a chance to nail down the second-row berth alongside James Ryan. It would take a braver gambler than me to bet against Beirne staking his claims for the Lions in the coming games.Finn Russell in untested waters Scotland v Georgia, 7.30pm, Friday 23 October, BT Murrayfield, Live on ITV4Look back to February and the world seemed all so very different. Social distancing was something you did to avoid small talk at parties, Wasps were languishing in the bottom half of the Premiership table and Finn Russell wasn’t being considered for international selection.Moving forward: Scotland coach Gregor Townsend with fly-half Finn Russell (Getty Images)It’s a story we all know well – a fallout on the eve of the Six Nations between Russell and Gregor Townsend saw the fly-half sent home.Yet Scotland still had an impressive start to the Six Nations. They lost to Ireland in a game they really could have won (how long ago does it seem since Stuart Hogg dropping the ball was a thing?!), and were only narrowly beaten by England in a pestilence of rain one week later.A 17-0 beatdown of Italy followed, before Russell’s replacement, Adam Hastings, played brilliantly well in an impressive 28-17 win over leaders France. Second place in the championship is a real possibility.Relationships often need space, and lockdown provided that breathing room for Townsend and Russell to get their partnership back on track, with the Racing stand-off returning to the squad for the autumn fixtures. But what will Scotland look like now?We know from his time at Racing that Russell stars when he is the boss – a team he can quarterback, built in his image. Will he ever be able to have this level of control for Scotland again? And what about Hastings, who will surely not be content to roll over and lose the shirt, a man who Townsend will justifiably feel some loyalty towards after his Six Nations exploits?Hastings has the start on Friday night against Georgia, with Russell on the bench. Can the Glasgow man hold off Russell’s challenge for the all-important Wales clash at the end of the month? Or could the pair be named in the same back-line at ten and 12, as discussed in the current issue of Rugby World magazine? Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Curious GeorgiaScotland v Georgia, 7.30pm, Friday 23 October, BT Murrayfield, Live on ITV4After every lopsided Italy loss comes the guttural call from certain corners to include Georgia in the Six Nations. They’re not quite there yet – but the next few weeks are their best chance to make it. Like a twirling ballerina, the spotlight is upon them – let’s hope for some style as well as scrummaging.Remember, this is what Georgia have been asking for. With this warm-up against Scotland before four Autumn Nations Cup fixtures, they’ll be playing five top-tier nations in a row – a far cry from the odd International or a World Cup every four years.Starter at ten: Tedo Abzhandadze on the attack for Georgia (Getty Images)Coach Levan Maisashvili has said his team will treat the Murrayfield clash as a warm-up – the Lelos playing an experimental team, with only six players retained in the starting XV from their final World Cup match against Australia last year. They’ve also got some interesting new coaching appointments, with ex-Gloucester DoR David Humphreys joining as a high-performance consultant for the tournament.Keep an eye out for fly-half Tedo Abzhandadze. He’s only 21, but is a player capable of some quite gorgeous touches – the Georgian Jalibert.Which of France and Wales can kick their year back into gear? France v Wales, 8.10pm, Saturday 24 October, Stade de France, Live on ITV4 & S4CMomentum is massive in sport. France had plenty of it in this Six Nations until a Mohamed Haouas punch, a loss to Scotland and an enforced seven-month break from rugby almost destroyed their best chance of a Six Nations title in a decade.Back in: Vincent Rattez returns to the France line-up to face Wales (Getty Images)Still, coach Fabien Galthié can call on an almost identical XV from the spring, with wing Vincent Rattez the only personnel change from France’s Six Nations game against Wales, coming in for centre Arthur Vincent, who moves to the bench – remarkable consistency after such a long break.They will also come into the game against Wayne Pivac’s side with confidence, their 27-23 triumph over Wales in February arguably their most impressive performance since the 2011 World Cup.Speaking of momentum, Wales are desperate for a little of their own. The Six Nations saw them slump to three successive defeats in games against Ireland, France and England, meaning next weekend’s game against Scotland is suddenly crucial if they want to avoid a fifth-place finish. Taking charge: Andy Farrell at Ireland training ahead of the Italy game (Inpho) last_img read more

Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgEngland v Ireland on 21 November will also be available on free-to-air TV as Channel 4 are broadcasting that fixture. Channel 4 have the exclusive rights to show Ireland’s home pool games against Wales (13 Nov) and Georgia (29 Nov) in the UK too.Free-to-air Welsh language channel S4C has live coverage of Wales’ Autumn Nations Cup matches too. In Wales, you’ll find S4C on Sky channel 104, Freeview 4, Virgin TV 166 and Freesat 104. In the rest of the UK, it’s Sky channel 134, Freesat 120 and Virgin TV 166.If you’re from the UK but are overseas when Autumn Nations Cup matches take place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above. Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from the UKAmazon Prime Video are the main rights holders for the Autumn Nations Cup in the UK, showing 14 of the 16 matches live.If you’re an Amazon Prime member, coverage of those 14 games, plus an hour-long highlights package on each match day, is included in your package.If you’re not an Amazon Prime member, it costs £7.99 a month and you can cancel at any time, so you could just sign up for the period of the Autumn Nations Cup. Plus, if you’ve never signed up before, there is currently a 30-day FREE trial and you could watch the entire tournament in that time.Sign up to Amazon PrimeThe Prime Video app allows you to watch games on your TV, mobile, games console and more. Find out what devices you can watch Prime Video on here. Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to the Autumn Nations Cup from the Land of the Long White Cloud, Sky Sport NZ have the rights. You’ll need to set your alarms, though, as the 13-hour time difference means a lot of matches will take place in the early hours in New Zealand.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Here’s your guide to watching the new eight-team tournament, wherever you are in the world Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, beIN Sports has the rights to show Autumn Nations Cup matches.Access to beIN Sports’ Connect package is $19.99 a month or $179.99 for a year and also includes lots of European football action.You can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers so you could take advantage of that to watch some of these Autumn Nations Cup matches.Kayo Sports offer Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from anywhereThe Autumn Nations Cup is a new tournament that has also brought new broadcasters into the rugby market.The eight-team competition, which features England, Fiji, France, Georgia, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales, sees 16 matches played between 13 November and 6 December.Related: Autumn Nations Cup FixturesAmazon Prime Video are the main UK broadcasters. It’s a first rugby tournament for the online streaming service and they have brought in some familiar faces for their coverage – check out the Amazon Prime pundits here.Matches will also be broadcast around the world and here’s your guide to how to watch the Autumn Nations Cup wherever you are…How to watch the Autumn Nations Cup from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Autumn Nations Cup coverage, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Autumn Nations Cup live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to watch the Autumn Nations Cup from South Africa, SuperSport is the place to go. The broadcaster is showing all matches live.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from AsiaPremier Sports has the rights to broadcast Autumn Nations Cup coverage in Asia and will show matches in 22 territories – Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.A weekly pass to Premier Sports Asia is $19.99 or you can take out a rolling six-month contract for $59.99.Premier Sports Asia subscription On camera: England and Ireland will meet in the Autumn Nations Cup (Getty Images) Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from IrelandIreland’s four Autumn Nations Cup matches – against Wales, England, Georgia and their ‘final’ – will be broadcast live on free-to-air RTE 2 and RTE Player in Ireland.Premier Sports will show the other 12 matches live for Irish viewers. If you have a Sky contract, Premier Sports is part of the broadcaster’s ‘Sports Extra’ package, which costs €10 a month for the first six months and €20 a month after that for Sky Sports customers (€17 and €34 for non-Sky Sports customers).You can also access Premier Sports via a Now TV day or month pass, which allows you to watch sports channels without committing to a long-term contract.Get a Now TV Pass Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from FranceFrance 2, a free-to-air channel, has the Autumn Nations Cup broadcast rights in France.Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from GeorgiaThose in Georgia can watch the Lelos compete in the Autumn Nations Cup on Imedi TV.Autumn Nations Cup TV Coverage: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, FloSports have the exclusive rights to show every Autumn Nations Cup match live. You can stream matches via FloSports or watch via the app.A FloRugby monthly subscription costs $29.99 and the annual subscription is $150, with both packages also giving you access to the entire FloSports network, which includes coverage of cycling, motorsport and American football.Sign up to FloRugby We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? 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Via Crucis: ‘No hay muros que puedan separarnos de la…

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Por Pat McCaughanPosted Apr 5, 2012 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Via Crucis: ‘No hay muros que puedan separarnos de la gracia de Dios’ Peregrinación a la frontera entre EE.UU. y México destaca los problemas de la inmigración Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service El obispo James Mathes de San Diego y la obispa Diane Bruce de Los Ángeles se encuentran entre un grupo de unos 80 episcopales que tomaron parte en la peregrinación de las Estaciones de la Cruz desde el parque MacArthur en Los Ángeles hasta la frontera entre EE.UU. y México en San Diego, donde los dos obispos celebraron la Eucaristía al mismo tiempo que otro oficio se celebraba del otro lado del muro. Foto de Jane Kawamoto.[The Episcopal News – Diócesis de Los Ángeles] Dos muros de acero de 20 pies de alto entre Tijuana y San Diego hacen prácticamente imposible cualquier contacto físico o visual, pero no pudieron impedir a episcopales y anglicanos de ambos lados de la frontera celebrar juntos la Eucaristía el 2 de abril.El despliegue de unidad tenía por objetivo resaltar la apremiante situación de los indocumentados y las injustas leyes de inmigración que separan y dividen a las familias, dijeron la obispa sufragánea de la diócesis de Los Ángeles y el obispo Jim Mathes de la diócesis de San Diego.Con los helicópteros de la Patrulla Fronteriza de EE.UU. sobrevolándolos, los dos obispos bendijeron el pan y el vino a las 3:00 P.M. en un oficio del lado estadounidense de la frontera en el parque de la Amistad [Friendship Park] de San Diego. A unos pocos metros del otro lado de la frontera, clérigos de la Iglesia Anglicana de México hacían lo mismo.“¡Qué estupenda manera de celebrar este lunes de Semana Santa”, dijo Bruce luego. “Al final del oficio, las personas (del lado mexicano) se acercaron individualmente al muro y pidieron bendiciones.“[La experiencia] me llevó hasta el límite, al hacerme comprender que no hay muros que puedan separarnos de la gracia amorosa de Dios. No hay ninguna frontera que pueda lograr eso”.La frontera fue la última estación de este Via Crucis (Camino de la Cruz) interurbano, una peregrinación que comenzó a las 8:30 A.M. en el parque MacArthur de Los Ángeles y culminó con la Eucaristía en la frontera, recorrido a lo largo del cual se conmemoraron las 14 estaciones de la Cruz. Luego de rezar las primeras tres estaciones en el parque MacArthur, unos 40 peregrinos formaron una caravana de automóviles.La procesión la encabezaba una imagen en madera Jesús de 6 pies de alto que viajó en una camioneta más de 200 kilómetros en dirección sur a lo largo de la autopista Interestatal 5. En el trayecto se fueron añadiendo peregrinos a la caravana que se detuvo para rezar, en inglés y en español, en los puntos designados como estaciones de la Cruz en San Clemente y Chula Vista antes de llegar a la frontera.“Para nosotros hoy, como cristianos, es uno de los momentos más sagrados del año -la Semana Santa- y estamos contando la historia de la opresión que padeció nuestro Señor Jesucristo”, dijo la Rda. Liz Muñoz, rectora de la iglesia de la Trinidad en Los Ángeles y organizadora de la peregrinación.“Muchos de nosotros creemos que Jesús fue alguien que emigró del cielo a la tierra”, dijo ella a los que se reunieron en el parque MacArthur. “Él vino del cielo sin documentación a enseñarnos a amar a Dios y amarnos los unos a los otros”.“Nos congregamos hoy para orar por leyes de inmigración justas que les permitan a las familias que han estado unidas que sigan estando unidas aquí para participar y ser queridas tal como todo el mundo merece ser querido en este país”.Una imagen del Salvador del Mundo, traída originalmente de El Salvador y usualmente expuesta en la iglesia episcopal de la Trinidad (Trinity Episcopal Church), en Los Ángeles, acompañó la peregrinación del Via Crucis. Foto de Janet KawamotoSeñalando a la imagen de Jesús, con corona dorada y manto rojo brillante, dentro de un fanal de vidrio en la parte trasera de la camioneta, Muñoz prosiguió: Este Salvador del Mundo hizo todo el trayecto desde San Salvador [El Salvador] en un camión, cruzando tres fronteras. Hoy lo estamos llevando de regreso a una frontera, la primera frontera, y esperemos que algún año, en algún momento de nuestra vida, sea la última”.Rosie Vásquez, de 45 años y feligresa de la iglesia de Todos los Santos [All Saints Church] en Highland Park, dijo que ella se había sentido movida a unirse a la peregrinación “debido a mi fe.“Esto tiene que ver con mi familia, tiene que ver con mi país, tiene que ver con el amor de Jesús por todos nosotros”, dijo Vásquez, que leyó las oraciones en español en la primera estación [del Via Crucis] “Jesús es condenado a muerte”. “Yo nunca he hecho nada como esto antes”, añadió Vásquez, que vino a Los Ángeles procedente de Guatemala en 1986. “Me siento tan entusiasmada de formar parte de esto”.Christy Goulet, de 23 años, y Jazmin Trammell, de 25, internas urbanas episcopales asignadas a la iglesia de Santa María [St. Mary’s] en Los Ángeles, dijeron que se habían incorporado al grupo multiétnico de peregrinos “para aprender más sobre las tradiciones y la liturgia episcopales” y experimentar las conexiones entre las estaciones de la cruz y los problemas de la inmigración.“Todos somos peregrinos”, dijo el Rdo. Patrick Crerar, rector de la iglesia de San Clemente del Mar [St. Clement by-the-Sea] en San Clemente, mientras le daba la bienvenida al grupo que llegaba de Los Ángeles.“Apoyamos la unidad de la familia, no la división. Es el deseo de Dios y es el deseo de la Iglesia y es el deseo de todos nosotros que las familias se reunifiquen, de manera que nos unimos a esta peregrinación para buscar la voluntad de Dios, para buscar la justicia de Dios en nuestras leyes de inmigración y para buscar una mayor unidad en las familias divididas por el muro”.En la escuela episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s Episcopal School] en Chula Vista, el obispo Mathes recibió a los peregrinos de Los Ángeles. [Al dirigirse al grupo] él dijo que emulaba a Jesús “el gran cruzador de fronteras, que nos mostró el camino de pasar de la vida divina a la vida humana y de ésta a la vida sempiterna”.“Ésta es la Semana Santa”, agregó. “Esta es la semana en que recordamos la muerte de Jesús y esperamos su resurrección. Por lo menos, yo espero que esta peregrinación sea un momento de nueva vida para los que buscan esperanza”.Para Juana Córdoba, líder laica de la iglesia de El Mesías [Church of the Messiah] en Santa Ana, la peregrinación fue tanto personal como dolorosa.“Yo vine a buscar un empleo para sostener a mis hijos porque no tenía nada con que alimentarlos y ningún dinero en México”, dijo a través de un intérprete. Ella estuvo yendo y viniendo entre ambos países hasta que, poco a poco, pudo traer a todos sus hijos, explicó Córdoba, madre soltera de seis, a quien le afloran las lágrimas cuando menciona esa separación.“Quiero hacer algo por la separación de las familias”, añadió Córdoba, los miembros de cuya familia terminaron por hacerse ciudadanos de EE.UU. “Quiero colaborar en pro de una solución porque hay muchas personas hoy día que no tienen documentos. Me siento muy solidaria con ellas. Mi mayor deseo es que haya algún tipo de programa donde las personas puedan obtener documentación para trabajar”.Blanca Ruelas-Suárez, también feligresa de la iglesia del Mesías, se muestra de acuerdo con ella. “Estoy aquí para apoyar a los que no son lo bastante afortunados para tener la documentación que yo tengo, y con la esperanza de que los líderes de nuestro gobierno prestarán atención y harán algo para ayudarles”, dijo ella a través de un intérprete.“También estoy aquí para honrar y hacer duelo por las personas que han muerto tratando de cruzar la frontera”.El grupo había aumentado hasta cerca de 80 personas en el momento en que los peregrinos llegaron al parque de la Amistad [Friendship Park], situado dentro del parque estatal del Terreno Fronterizo [Border Field State Park]. Allí, en el espacio entre los dos muros, se celebró la Eucaristía.Los peregrinos portaban cruces y estandartes rojos durante la media hora de marcha a lo largo del océano hasta los muros de la frontera [que en algunos tramos se reduce a una cerca que deja ver el otro lado]. Unos 180 peregrinos que se habían reunido del lado de Tijuana prorrumpieron en vítores, silbidos y aplausos cuando vieron que se acercaba el grupo de Estados Unidos, así como en gritos de “nadie es inmigrante”, al tiempo que un mariachi empezaba a tocar.Los clérigos y las congregaciones de México que participaron incluían al Rdo. Miguel Zavala-Múgica, de San Juan Apóstol y Evangelista en Ensenada; al Rdo. Adeli Candelario García, de la misión anglicana de Cristo el Rey en Tijuana, así como a niños del Colegio la Esperanza y de la Casa Hogar Dorcas y la Casa Vida Joven.La Eucaristía junto al muro se celebró con el permiso y la plena cooperación de la Patrulla Fronteriza de EE.UU., según dijo Bruce.Sólo dejaron entrar a 25 personas al mismo tiempo en el espacio entre ambos muros. Según entraba cada grupo de 25 personas para recibir la comunión, la gente se aproximaban a la cerca y trataban de tocar, saludar y conectarse con los del otro lado.“Vi allí a un viejo amigo de muchísimos años”, dijo el Rdo. Roberto Limatu, de Los Ángeles. “Este ha sido un día muy, muy bueno”.Para Luis Garibay, encargado del edificio del centro diocesano de la Catedral de San Pablo [St Paul] en Los Ángeles, cargar la imagen tamaño natural de Jesús en la camioneta y luego llevarla hasta la frontera fue, de suyo, toda una experiencia.“Las personas se nos acercaban en la autopista y se fijaban en nosotros dentro de la camioneta. Luego se quedaban detrás para tomar fotos de Jesús. Oí a alguien que puso una de las fotos en la Internet y dijo: “Jesús está conduciendo por la autopista”.La obispa Diane Bruce de Los Ángeles y el obispo James Mathes y el Rdo. Carlos García, de San Diego, se disponen a concelebrar la Eucaristía junto al muro fronterizo entre EE.UU. y México. El oficio se celebró simultáneamente del otro lado de la frontera. Foto de Janet KawamotoA la Rda. Jennifer Hughes, que imparte estudios latinos en la Universidad de California en Riverside, y a quien se le ocurrió la idea del Via Crucis, dijo que se sentía contenta con la asistencia que había tenido la peregrinación, pero añadió que esperaba “una comunidad eucarística más sostenida, más que una vez al año. Es mi esperanza de que habrá algún tipo de testimonio eucarístico regular en la frontera”.El Rdo. Carlos García, vicario de la iglesia de Santa Rosa del Mar y sacerdote encargado de la iglesia de San Felipe Apóstol [St. Philip the Apostle] en Lemon Grove, en la diócesis de San Diego, está de acuerdo en que el empeño debe continuar.“El día de hoy me dio más de un sentido del por qué estamos aquí. Se trata de unir a las familias. Sin duda que lo volvería a hacer”.El Rdo. Butch Gamarra, de la diócesis de Los Ángeles, dio que esperaba que la peregrinación sirviera para destacar los problemas “de manera que la gente pueda oírlos. Éste puede ser un tema muy polarizador y debemos ayudar a destacar la apremiante situación de los inmigrantes. Es una tragedia humana. Uno no puede llamar ilegal al pueblo de Dios. Ningún ser humano es ilegal. Usted podría ser indocumentado, pero no ilegal.“Tenemos que dar a conocer la situación de las familias que se rompen, de cuán traumático es para los niños cuando sus padres son deportados, cuando no pueden quedarse en la escuela. Especialmente la gente de fe debemos levantar nuestras voces en [su] defensa e intentar que se llegue a alguna solución con la reforma migratoria, de manera que las personas puedan vivir vidas normales y ser tratadas como personas, no como peones políticos”.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de The Episcopal News de la diócesis de Los Ángeles. Traducido por Vicente Echerri.La obispa Diane Bruce bendice a los participantes del lado mexicano de la frontera. Foto de Janet Kawamoto Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA R.A. GARCIA says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis April 6, 2012 at 1:34 pm ¡Qué bello!, ¿verdad? No deja de ser interesante apreciar que la obispa Diana Bruce co-oficiara esta protesta y eucaristía, sobre todo, cuando entiendo que la Iglesia Episcopal de México no solo por que apoyó el COVENANT, sino po que tengo entendido que se opone a la ordenación de LGBTT’s al sacerdocio y de tener mujeres obispas. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Decline in revenues leaves Anglican Church of Canada with deficit

first_img [Anglican Journal] General Synod, the governing body of the Anglican Church of Canada, ended 2011 with a deficit of CAN$65,000 (US$63,414), due to a decline in expected revenue of CAN$808,000 (US$788,288), according to Treasurer Michele George.Reviewing General Synod’s financial results for 2011 at the spring meeting here of the Council of General Synod (CoGS), George explained that the budget of CAN$12 million (US$11.71 million) had planned for a surplus of CAN$18,000 (US$17,557). Instead, a loss on investments, a decline in proportional giving from dioceses and lower than anticipated results from annual appeals led to a shortfall.General Synod was able to use 20% of CAN$2 million (US$1.95 million) in undesignated legacies to help cover the shortfall, George told delegates.The 2011 results show that budgeting revenue remains a challenge for General Synod, said George, adding that, “We’re clearly struggling at the moment.” Although General Synod has always budgeted conservatively when it comes to investment income, this year, it is being “more diligent” in monitoring revenue. If necessary, other sources of funding may need to be identified or work deferred, she said.“Resources for Mission, particularly the annual appeals, were disappointing and resulted in a shortfall of CAN$752,000 (US$733,443),” according to the financial management committee report to CoGS. The shortfall was partially cushioned by a reserve of $200,000 and partly from undesignated legacies.Proportional giving fell short of budget by CAN$273,000 (US$266,262), but part of the loss was cushioned by another reserve of CAN$200,000 (US$195,064), according to the financial management committee report to CoGS.The continued volatility of global investment markets resulted in a loss of more than CAN$300,000 (US$292,622) in market value of the investments, the report added. The 2011 budget had anticipated more than CAN$150,000 (US$146,318) in investment revenue but instead lost CAN$164,000 (US$159,974). “We were off budget by CAN$83,000 (US$80,974),” George said in an interview.Vianney (Sam) Carriere, director of resources for mission, said that one of several possible reasons for the under-performance of the Anglican Appeal was that “the original estimate of the revenues may have been too high.” He pointed out that the other fundraising campaigns in the national church, including the Anglican Journal Appeal and the Gifts for Mission catalog, met their targets in 2011.The good news, said Carriere, who is also director of communications and information resources, is that the Anglican Appeal campaign already appears to be ahead of its target for this year. “So we’re hoping that last year was a blip and that we’ll recover.” In addition, efforts are underway to strengthen all three fundraising campaigns through the integration of campaign staff and resources. “Hopefully it will pay off,” said Carriere.The council, in three separate resolutions, approved the 2011 financial statements of General Synod, the Consolidated Trust Fund, and the Resolution Corporation.— Marites N. Sison is staff writer for the Anglican Journal. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Marites N. SisonPosted May 29, 2012 Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Decline in revenues leaves Anglican Church of Canada with deficit Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more