Josh Kroenke reveals the two reasons Arsenal sacked Unai Emery and sends message to Freddie Ljungberg

first_img Jose Mourinho: Unai Emery sacking is ‘sad news’To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 3:41FullscreenJose Mourinho: Unai Emery sacking is ‘sad news’https://metro.co.uk/video/jose-mourinho-unai-emery-sacking-sad-news-2059914/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘My message to Freddie and the players was let’s get back to basics and most importantly let’s get back to having some fun.‘I think footballers are at their best when I see smiles on their faces and going out there and winning matches. That’s a winning formula to me.’Kroenke also admitted Arsenal would take their time over naming a permanent successor to Emery, with a host of names being linked with the position.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves‘Our process is already underway,’ the Arsenal chief said. ‘It’s going to be led by Raul, Vinai, Edu and Huss here internally.‘I look forward to getting with them and working closely with them throughout this process.‘Because of our confidence in Freddie we’re very fortunate that we’re going to be entering into our process and doing a thorough search and it’s about finding the right candidate, it’s not about finding the first candidate.’AdvertisementAdvertisementMORE: Emmanuel Petit wants Patrick Vieira to be next Arsenal managerMORE: Freddie Ljungberg reveals how his Arsenal side will differ to Unai Emery’s Comment Advertisement Josh Kroenke has explained why Arsenal sacked manager Unai Emery (Picture: Getty)Josh Kroenke has revealed the two reasons Arsenal sacked Unai Emery and urged interim boss Freddie Ljungberg to bring the smiles back to Arsenal.Spanish manager Emery arrived at the Emirates last year having won a league title at PSG and three Europa Leagues at Sevilla.But the 48-year-old struggled to prove his worth in the Premier League and finally lost his job on Friday morning following a demoralising Europa League defeat to Eintracht Frankfurt. Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 30 Nov 2019 6:52 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link207Shares Freddie Ljungberg has been placed in charge of Arsenal on a temporary basis (Picture: Getty)He added: ‘First and foremost Freddie has Arsenal DNA.‘Obviously he was a player here for a number of years, the supporters know him very well and he’s worked diligently behind the scenes for the past several years, including the last year and a half or so with Arsenal again.‘So it’s been great to have him around, he knows the club’s DNA and we feel he is the right person in the moment to take the club forward. Josh Kroenke reveals the two reasons Arsenal sacked Unai Emery and sends message to Freddie Ljungberg Advertisement Emery spent 18 underwhelming months at the Emirates (Picture: Getty)Kroenke says the Arsenal board decided to sack Emery after becoming ‘concerned’ by recent performances and because the club were beginning to ‘fall short of several goals’ that were set before the season started.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘Like all of our fans and supporters around the globe, we’ve been concerned about our recent string of performances,’ the Arsenal director said.‘We wanted to support Unai and his staff until we decided it was time to make a change and ultimately we came to that decision over the last several weeks as a group between myself, Raul, Vinai and Edu.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘[It was a] very difficult decision. First and foremost Unai is a good man, someone that we all respect very much. His work ethic on a daily basis between him and his staff was fantastic.‘Ultimately we started to fall short of several goals that we set. We still feel that we can achieve those goals this season, which is why we decided to make the change now.’Former Arsenal midfielder Freddie Ljungberg has been placed in temporary charge of the Gunners and Kroenke has revealed what he expects from the club legend.last_img read more

Both bumpy and bright spots in Iowa’s economy this decade

first_imgDES MOINES — Economists taking stock as Iowa enters the 2020s indicate this decade has been a “bumpy ride” for key sectors, like agriculture and technology. Iowa State University ag economist Chad Hart says there were about 93,000 farms in Iowa in 2007.“In 2017, they updated the Census of Agriculture. We only had 86,000, so we have seen the number of farms shrink,” Hart says. “That means the average size of the farm has grown…It takes more money to farm these days. We’ve seen incomes rise, but we’ve also seen expenses rise.”The other thing that’s rising is the number of farmers who have off-the-farm jobs, according to Hart.“We have some farm families that are surviving by not necessarily growing the farm, but relying upon the farm as part of the portfolio of their economic activity,” Hart says.Creighton University economist Ernie Goss says there’s more volatility in Iowa’s agriculture and manufacturing sectors now than in previous decades because of global competition.“This presents challenges but opportunities,” Goss says. “One other factor that Iowa has been pretty successful historically in attracting workers from other nations. That’s legal migration and, of course, that’s slowed down pretty dramatically over the last couple of years.”Dave Swenson, another economist from Iowa State University, says manufacturing and construction are “reasonably bright spots” in Iowa’s economy.“In contrast to the nation, we have more people working in construction than we did before the ‘Great Recession,’” Swenson says, “and our manufacturing sector has recovered to close to what it was prior to the recession.”But Swenson says while the state’s unemployment rate is historically low, overall job growth in Iowa lags behind most other states.“We have fewer fast-growing sectors in our economy compared to the nation,” Swenson says. “Our information sector contracted sharply, but the subset of that information sector — for example, IT — it also contracted. Whereas nationally IT and IT-related business opportunities are growing and especially in hot spots like Seattle and the San Francisco area and Denver and places like that.”Goss, the Creighton University economist, regularly surveys purchasing managers and bankers in Iowa and other Midwest states. He’s concerned by the declining number of independent banks.“That becomes a real challenge for lending in the area as farmers, manufacturers, individuals don’t have a source for borrowing or savings in a bank that’s locally tied,” Goss says. “Those banks that are independent, community banks — they understand their customers.”According to the State Banking Division, about 30 state-chartered banks closed between 2011 and 2018 and more than 50 federally-regulated community banks closed during that period. Those trends are happening in other states as well.Iowa ranks 30th overall in terms of economic output. According to the latest federal data, the state’s gross domestic product rose just over one percent in the second quarter of this year.last_img read more