Wisconsin cruises to 3rd-straight win

first_imgKelsey Fenton / The Badger HeraldThe University of Wisconsin volleyball team wrapped up its three-match spring schedule at home with a 3-1 win over UW-Milwaukee (25-16, 23-25, 25-23, 25-17) Tuesday night.Wisconsin has dropped just two sets in three wins against Loyola, UW-Green Bay and UW-Milwaukee during its exhibition spring season.Head coach Kelly Sheffield stressed that in the few months he has coached the team, he has seen small improvements throughout the spring that helped contribute to the night’s victory.“We did a better job of getting our middles and our right side more involved in the attack tonight,” Sheffield said. “That was a goal going in. I thought our serving put some pressure on them. [UWM is] a different team than what we’ll typically see in the Big Ten. Their offense is really quick and they put some different stresses on your middles than what [we’ve] seen. I thought we got a little stronger as the match went on.”After the Badger offense cruised to a .423 hitting percentage while committing just two errors in the first set, Wisconsin lost its sense of rhythm in the second set. Down 8-11, the Badgers already had five errors in the set. After Wisconsin made four consecutive kills mid-set, the team earned its first lead of the set to go up 16-14. However, UWM won the last four points of the set to tie the match at one.Sophomore setter Courtney Thomas, who amassed a spring-high 46 assists, said that if the passing is not rhythmic, it is difficult for the hitters to time the ball properly. However, she said the passing improved significantly after the second set and has become more consistent since the start of spring practice.“I thought our passing was a lot better tonight than it was on Saturday,” Thomas said. “I felt rhythm; I felt like our hitters were doing well tonight.”Wisconsin was again faced with a challenging set in the third, when both teams were separated by no fewer than three points. However, the Badgers were able to inch out a 25-23 win in the third, producing just three errors and avoiding a second-straight close loss.Sheffield said the Badgers need to do a better job of keeping their composure when they make mistakes and not letting one error turn into multiple.“When we play good volleyball, we’ve got to do it for longer periods of time than what we’re doing,” Sheffield said. “We’ll get better at that once we come to get used to each other.”Wisconsin began the fourth set in a 2-7 hole while hitting a .071 attack percentage. But the Badgers bounced back to end the set and the match on a 10-2 run after being tied at 15.Three Badgers accumulated double-digit kills throughout the evening, including junior outside hitter Julie Mikaelsen, who led all players with 15 kills. The Norwegian also contributed 13 digs to earn the double-double.Last season, Mikaelsen transitioned to a more defensive role on the team by digging more balls. She said she has gotten more comfortable working in the back row.While she was on offense during the match, Mikaelsen also said she concentrated on the spots on the court she knew she could hit.“Focusing on doing the right techniques,” Mikaelsen said. “Focusing on doing the hitting I know I can do. Annemarie was helping me a lot by calling the shots that I had open; it helped me a lot.”Mikaelsen admitted that a weakness the team has been working on is consistency. Wisconsin’s hitting percentage dropped .207 from the first to the second set.However, Mikaelsen said Sheffield has made it a priority to improve Wisconsin’s mental toughness to stay consistent.“We go up and then we go down,” Mikaelsen said. “We need to be more stable. We’re working really hard on becoming that team that’s really stable and bringing it every single practice.”Sheffield’s main focus of the spring season is not necessarily the results of the matches. He wants to see small improvements from his players in practices and match situations.“We’re just trying to get a little bit better,” Sheffield said. “There’s not a lot of changing [of positions or formations]. We’re just trying to do what we do in our system and just be a little bit more consistent and a little bit better.”last_img read more

He was HB’s green thumb

first_imgOBITUARY: Longtime resident, who spent three years in an internment camp, ran nursery with late wife. By Andrea Woodhouse STAFF WRITER Eizo Etow, a longtime Hermosa Beach resident and former owner of a prominent South Bay nursery, has died. He was 87. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityEtow died at home Friday of natural causes, said his daughter, Margaret Mitchell. An artist who chose paint and plants as his media, he ran Etow’s 101 Nursery for nearly 40 years and landscaped many residential and commercial yards in the South Bay, Mitchell said. Etow was born May 2, 1920, in San Diego, and lived his childhood in Japan. He returned to the United States and settled in Hermosa Beach in 1938, with intentions of attending art school at USC, Mitchell said. But upon the advent of World War II, Etow was instead sent to an internment camp in Arizona in 1942. There, Etow met and married his wife, Kay. The couple were released in 1945 and lived briefly in Colorado before settling back in Hermosa Beach. “He went away as a 19-year-old college student and came back with a wife, two babies and a father-in-law,” Mitchell said. Etow began work as a Japanese-style gardener, but had trouble finding the proper materials to execute his vision, she said. So, the couple opened a nursery in 1948 near Pacific Coast Highway and Catalina Avenue, Mitchell said. Through the years, the nursery occupied several locations – including Aviation Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway in Hermosa Beach – and Etow continued to artfully landscape yards all over the South Bay, she said. He was a past director of the California Association of Nurserymen, and received an award as an expert nurseryman from California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo. The civic-minded couple donated plants and shrubbery to schools and shut-ins, and Etow was active with the Boy Scouts of America, as well as the Hermosa Beach Rotary Club, Mitchell said. Etow retired and closed the nursery in 1985, Mitchell said. The couple were longtime members of the Hermosa Garden Club, and he did the cover artwork for the group’s annual membership book for many years. Etow told the Daily Breeze in 1994 that he often spent time tidying up the grounds and sketching at a tiny parkette on Herondo Street named after his wife, who died in 1974. And just last week, the Rotary Club rededicated the newly refurbished park to Etow, planting a tree and laying a plaque in his honor. “What a wonderful send-off it was,” said Anne Sullivan, the garden club’s president. “We are really going to miss him.” Etow is survived by four children and two grandchildren. Memorial services are pending. [email protected] local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more