Iowa governor planning DC meeting over ‘short term crisis’ in ethanol industry

first_imgDES MOINES — Governor Kim Reynolds and Midwest governors are planning a trip to Washington, D.C. to talk with President Trump about unrest in farm country.“Let him know first-hand what’s happening on the ground,” Reynolds said Tuesday.The Trump Administration recently granted waivers to oil companies, so the federally-required amount of ethanol doesn’t have to be blended into gasoline.“We’re trying to give them some options…to really address the short-term crisis that we’re seeing with ethanol plants either shutting down or cutting production,” Reynolds said.A northwest Iowa plant shut down temporarily earlier this month and another company that owns six plants in Iowa has cut its company-wide ethanol output. The Iowa Corn Growers Association issued a statement this morning, saying farmers are “fed up” with President Trump’s “broken promises.” In addition to the ethanol situation, farmers have been up in arms about USDA harvest projections in mid-August that caused corn prices to nose dive.“This has been a rough, rough year between flooding, delaying plants, rosy crop reports,” Reynolds said. “We’ve got continued disruption in trade that we’re working through.”Reynolds is hoping the Trump Administration will embrace a compromise plan that would boost ethanol production by requiring additional ethanol use at oil refineries that did not get a waiver.“I understand he’s trying to balance refineries that are also saying they’re shutting down with ethanol plants that are also shutting down,” Reynolds said.Reynolds said Trump “is trying to do the right thing” by farmers, but the EPA continues to “undercut” the federal ethanol production mandate.“We can’t continue to lower the floor and expect the industry to survive and continue to grow,” Reynolds said.According to the Reuters wire service, Trump personally gave the go-ahead for the oil refinery waivers. Reynolds told reporters this morning she’s not sure Trump “fully understood the ramifications” of those waivers at the time, but the governor said Trump does now after lobbying by her and several other Iowa officials. Reynolds, who just signed on as Iowa co-chair of Trump’s reelection campaign, said “relationships matter” and she’s able to call Trump and his top administrators to discuss these issues.last_img read more

Ex-governor of Iowa quits presidential race

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “I came up against something for the first time in my life that hard work and effort couldn’t overcome,” he said, his wife, Christie, and two grown sons at his side. “I just couldn’t work any harder, couldn’t give it enough.” Vilsack’s withdrawal still leaves a crowded field of eight Democrats. He will remain an important figure in the presidential race as former rivals undoubtedly will seek his endorsement and help to win Iowa. Vilsack, who likely will be considered as a vice presidential nominee, repeatedly declined to endorse another candidate at his news conference. Other campaigns immediately began to seek out Vilsack’s well-respected staff. Gary Hirshberg, CEO and founder of Stonyfield Farm yogurt, was one of Vilsack’s earliest and most prominent New Hampshire supporters. He said two minutes after Vilsack’s announcement, Obama called seeking his support. Hirshberg told Obama he wasn’t ready to commit to another candidate. DES MOINES, Iowa – Democrat Tom Vilsack, the former Iowa governor who built a centrist image, abandoned his bid for the presidency on Friday after struggling against better-known, better-financed rivals. “It is money and only money that is the reason we are leaving today,” Vilsack told reporters at a news conference, later adding, “We have a debt we’re going to have to work our way through.” Vilsack, 56, left office in January and traveled to early voting states, but he attracted neither the attention nor the campaign cash of his top-tier rivals – Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, Sen. Barack Obama and John Edwards. He even faced obstacles in his home state. In the most recent financial documents, Vilsack reported raising more than $1.1 million in the last seven weeks of 2006 but only had around $396,000 in the bank. Some campaign finance experts contend candidates will need $20 million by June 2007 to remain viable. last_img read more