Via Cheese To Buy Lucille Farms

first_imgAugust 8, 2006Via Cheese To Buy Lucille FarmsSwanton Vermont&Via Cheese, LLC announced today that it has agreed to buy the assets of Lucille Farms, a Swanton based manufacturer of mozzarella cheese which ceased operations in October of 2005. Via intends to restart the plant in October of this year and plans to make mozzarella and other Italian cheeses at the facility. Via is a sister company of Franklin Foods, which annually makes approximately 25,000,000 lbs of cream cheese products in its plant located in Enosburg Falls, Vermont.According to Jon Gutknecht, CEO of Via, This plant will be the perfect partner for our cream cheese operation and we plan to restore the plant to full scale production of premium mozzarella cheese in the coming months. Gutknecht, who is also CEO of Franklin Foods, stated that Via is an independent concern and will be operated as a separate company from Franklin Foods. He expects the two companies to work closely together to pursue joint efficiencies. The relationship will give Via Cheese immediate access to Franklin Foods national network of customers, distributors and cheese brokers. Via Cheese plans to establish mozzarella production by mid October and sell, initially, under the Lucille Farms brand. A plant expansion and production modernization project will begin in October with a planned completion in March 2007.Gutknecht noted that Franklin Foods corporate mission is to, Re-invent Cream Cheese and confirmed that the Company has recently been awarded a patent for its Yogurt Cream Cheese and has numerous patents pending for various innovations. He added, Franklin has recently used its technology to partner with several large branded manufacturers and several of the countrys leading grocery chains to make leading edge, modern cream cheese on trend with todays American consumer. In the same vein, Via Cheese will follow a strategy of innovation and invention to create high quality mozzarella cheese and other Italian specialties including Provolone, Asiago, and Fontina. Via will invite experienced members of the former Lucille Farms to join the team.Via is owned by the stockholders of Franklin Foods together with Erik Brue of Burlington, Vermont who will serve as President of Via Cheese. As Brue described his goals, The highest priority is restoring the plant to commercial scale production. He has begun the hiring process for production employees and will shortly begin a search for a plant manager. Via intends to retain the services of the team, which has kept the plant in operating order during the shutdown. Brue acknowledged that the company has ambitious goals but added that he believes, Via can be a leading manufacturer of premium mozzarella and the leading innovator in other Italian cheeses. It is an exciting mission which will be challenging but also fun.At former levels of production the plant used in excess of 150,000,000 lbs of milk, (or its equivalent) a year and was the second largest customer of the St. Albans Coop. The plant consumed approximately 6% of the milk produced in Vermont and about 12% of Franklin Countys production. The Chairman of Via, Nordahl Brue, who has been working with the St Albans Coop to secure milk supplies for the venture stated, Restoring this plant to production is very important to the economy of Vermont, and particularly important to the residents and farmers of Franklin County.The announcement followed a public auction Tuesday at which UPS Capital Business Credit, a secured creditor of Lucille Farms, Inc and Lucille Farms of Vermont, Inc, bought the factory and real estate formerly owned by Lucille. The closing of the Lucille plant last year changed the balance of milk processors locally and the state of Vermont has targeted high volume dairy manufacturers who are significant users of milk and milk solids to balance supply and demand. It is expected that this venture will advance the States objective in a very substantial manner. -30-For further information contact Erik Brue at (802) 868-7301last_img read more

Nothing doing… Bluestem buries Belle Plaine 50-14… Oxford no luck with Udall.. South Haven loses big

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — For three Sumner County teams, it was a rough night.Belle Plaine would lose to Bluestem on its homecoming 50-14. At one point it was 42-0 in the third quarter. Tough loss for the Dragons, who were hoping to get a W against the other winless team. The Dragons fall to 0-3 while Bluestem improves to 1-2.In another game, that on paper before the game it looked like it would be closer, Udall drilled Oxford 54-6. The game was close for a quarter with Udall leading 8-0 after one. The Eagles then scored five touchdowns and led 40-0 at the end of the second quarter. Oxford’s lone touchdown came on a Smith to Vaughn 16-yard touchdown throw in the the third quarter.South Haven was a loser to Cedar Vale-Dexter 40-6.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Provocation is no justification for abuse

first_imgDear Editor,A domiciled Guyanese recently posted on Facebook that women should stop provoking men, since such provocation leads to domestic abuse. This victim-blaming is nothing new, but it is indeed astounding that there are still women who propagate such a view, yet claim to be anti-abuse activists, as this poster does.Experts have reached a consensus on several common characteristics among batterers:- they are controlling; manipulative; often see themselves as victims; and believe that men have a pre-ordained right to be in charge of all aspects of a relationship.For some abusers, violence is a tool to keep their intimate partners from leaving the relationship; ensure that those partners ‘know their place’, and ‘respect’ their abusers, although that respect is generally equated with fear. Abuse, then, is the continuous result of power inequality between the partners, and one partner is afraid of, and harmed by, the other, who feels powerful in the relationship context, with ‘provocation’ being a mere excuse to exhibit this power.Yet, the same individual who hits his partner or child would be quite angry if a Police officer pulled him up for no reason, and/or demanded a bribe; but he would never chose to hit the Police officer. Similarly, that person would put up with provocation, but never choose to hit a boss, a worker in a Government office, someone in authority, or someone bigger and stronger than him.However, in a society where abuse has been normalised, women are still subservient to men, males are still socialised to see themselves as the ones with ‘power’ in a relationship (you a de maan), and citizens see abuse as not their business; alternate choices are hardly ever considered.Such alternatives include: do not overreact, but stay calm, and take a walk if necessary; listen without interrupting, but to understand; show respect instead of engaging in back and forth insults; be emphatic instead of judgmental, and apologise when the situation so demands; give each other space; discuss issues to seek non-violent resolutions; and even use humour in this process; recall the positives of the relationship as a way of recognizing what is at stake; seek the help of someone with mediating skills, such as an elder or a priest.These approaches are generally included in workshops and outreaches by abuse prevention entities such as The Caribbean Voice. However, there is only so much that non-governmental entities can do, and thus there is need for lay counsellors/gatekeepers who would indeed be equipped to help partners deal with relationship issues in every community. And as TCV has continuously pointed out, gatekeepers’ training can piggyback on all sorts of other training, so that it does not become a massive or expensive undertaking.As well, those involved in abuse activism on the ground must be armed with the knowledge to help partners address relationships’ issues, instead of seeking to justify abuse and engage in victim blaming. Otherwise, the harm can easily be multiplied.Sincerely,The Caribbean Voicelast_img read more

Candidates’ moves threaten to stall Iraq-spending deal

first_imgSen. Joseph R. Biden of Delaware said that he had proposed in January the idea of repealing the authority for the war resolution. Sen. Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut praised the idea, but said that it would not change the president’s Iraq policy. And Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois said October was too late to begin bringing troops home. The flurry of exchanges among presidential candidates, according to interviews with lawmakers in both parties, is obscuring efforts to reach a substantive legislative compromise on Capitol Hill. “The presidential debate is a complicating factor,” said Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., who is working with Sen. Olympia J. Snowe, R-Maine, to build a consensus to change Iraq strategy. “The whole thing is so polarized. There is a canyon separating the bases of both parties.” Of the burst of Iraq pronouncements by presidential candidates, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, chairman of the Republican conference, said: “It is poison in the middle of a war, when the issue is funding the troops.” In Congress, days after the president vetoed the Iraq spending bill, the Senate and the House were heading down different paths in producing new legislation to pay for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. WASHINGTON – The aggressive attempts by Democratic presidential hopefuls to shape the war debate are threatening to complicate congressional efforts to reach a deal on the Iraq spending bill, as the candidates’ calls for accelerating an end to the conflict compete with efforts by legislative leaders to extend funding for the war. The proposal by Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton to repeal President George W. Bush’s war authorization in October touched off a furious tussle on Friday among Democrats hoping to gain an upper hand with voters who oppose the war. It prompted other candidates to seek an even swifter end to the conflict, which is what some congressional leaders had been trying to avoid as war-spending negotiations with the White House intensify. John Edwards, the former North Carolina senator, said the plan was “a good statement to make,” but said Congress should use the power of the purse to end the war. He compared the proposal to the 1971 congressional action that repealed the resolution authorizing the Vietnam War, but noted: “The war went on for another three years.” Bill Richardson, the governor of New Mexico, said he proposed a similar measure three months ago. In an interview Friday, Richardson said the plan by Clinton of New York and Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., “only goes halfway,” because it would leave too many residual American forces in Iraq. As soon as next week, Democratic officials said, the House could consider a measure that would essentially provide $30 billion – or three months of funding for combat operations – and call for the president to report in midsummer on progress being made by the Iraqi government. Congress would then vote again on providing the remainder of the money sought by the administration. In the Senate, Democrats have opened negotiations with the administration in an effort to craft a measure that Bush would accept. The fact that the House and Senate are taking different approaches means another round of congressional negotiations must occur before a bill could be sent to the White House.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more