Op-Ed: Wind Industry Lifts South Dakota

first_imgOp-Ed: Wind Industry Lifts South Dakota FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Watertown Public Opinion:There are few greater economic development opportunities in rural America right now than wind power. Across the country, wind farms are providing a stable source of new revenue for farmers and ranchers, without disturbing their existing operations. These projects inject private capital into rural communities and produce new, family-supporting jobs where they are needed most.This growth occurring in South Dakota is because our region’s electricity providers recognize the benefits that wind energy can have for their customers. Not only is wind a low-cost, reliable source of electricity, it provides a hedge against the volatility of other fuel costs, such as natural gas or coal. Local landowners are also benefiting. Existing S.D. wind projects pay millions annually in land lease payments to rural landowners and millions more to locals, which helps fund vital services, support road improvements, and keep a lid on property taxes. Best of all, as wind energy grows in the state, so too will the money flowing to rural communities. Nationwide, rural landowners receive over $245 million annually from existing wind farms.The benefits of South Dakota’s wind boom don’t end at the project site. The wind industry relies on domestic manufacturing and over 25,000 Americans work to manufacture components for wind turbines. The added income, additional revenue, and new jobs are not coming at the expense of taxpayers, as Johnson asserts. While all forms of domestic energy production receive some form of government incentive, the wind industry has historically received far less than other sources. In fact, less than 3 percent of all federal energy incentives from 1947 to 2015 have gone to wind energy. It’s also important to understand that the primary federal incentive for wind development, the Production Tax Credit, only pays for power produced and is working as intended by helping spur wind development and lower energy costs. Indeed, the value of this tax credit flows directly through to ratepayers. Moreover, the credit has succeeded in driving the innovation and growth needed to push the cost of wind power down 66 percent since 2009. As a result, the wind industry agreed to support a phasedown of the incentive at the end of 2015 and the PTC is now set to completely phase out by the end of 2019. More: Wind energy good for the state and the nationlast_img read more

Indonesian palm oil exports to China drop by half in January: GAPKI

first_imgIndonesia’s palm oil exports to China have plummeted by half in volume amid global uncertainties, an industry source has said.The Indonesian Palm Oil Producers Association (GAPKI) said in a statement on Tuesday that China’s export volume fell by 381,000 tons or 57 percent. This contributed to the sharp drop in the country’s total palm oil exports, which declined by 35.6 percent to 2.39 million tons in January from 3.72 million tons in December 2019.”The drastic export decline in January could be because importing countries were still holding on to their stock while waiting for the Indonesia government to implement a 30 percent blended biodiesel [B30] program,” the association said in the statement. Topics : Should the decline continue, overall export performances could be dragged down in 2020 as palm oil has remained the country’s top export. The palm oil industry is one of Indonesia’s major foreign exchange earners, contributing 13.5 percent to total non-oil and gas exports worth US$22.3 billion, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani said on March 2.Read also: In Papua, forests offer more economic benefits than oil palm plantations, research findsA decline in palm oil exports to China will also hit the industry hard as one of the country’s main buyers of the commodity. In 2019, China imported 6 million tons of palm oil from Indonesia, representing 16.5 percent of overall palm oil exports during the year, GAPKI data showed.But China is not the only destination that saw a decline in palm oil exports in January. Palm oil exports to the European Union fell by 188,000 tons (30 percent), 141,000 tons (22 percent) for India and 129,000 tons for the United States (64 percent). Only Bangladesh saw a month-to-month increase by 52 percent to 40,000 tons in January.center_img The novel coronavirus, which emerged in China in late December 2019, could further lower the country’s crude palm oil (CPO) imports from Indonesia, as most of the country’s industries, including food and beverage producers, were closed for months.However, CPO CIF Rotterdam prices rose in January, as CPO prices increased to an average of US$830 per ton from an average of $787 tons in December last year. CPO production also increased to 3.48 million tons in January from 3.45 million tons in the previous month.Palm oil statistics 2019. (JP/Swi)”We hope that such good prices will motivate farmers and companies to take better care of their plantations in order to achieve higher productivity,” GAPKI wrote in the statement.Outside of CPO, palm oil kernel (PKO) and palm oil-based biodiesel exports also declined while palm oil oleochemicals exports rose by 22.9 percent, GAPKI data showed.Despite the export slowdown, domestic palm oil consumption increased slightly to 1.47 million tons in January from 1.45 million tons in December 2019.The increase is in line with President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s policy to increase the mandatory use of 20 percent blended biodiesel (B20) and B30, which was made in response to the EU’s palm oil restrictions.Read also: India allots import licenses for 1.1 million tons of refined palmolein from IndonesiaThe domestic market is expected to absorb 9 million tons of CPO a year once the B20 and B30 policies are both implemented.Jokowi had previously asked stakeholders to increase the mandatory use of CPO–based biodiesel from B20 to B30 by January and to 50 percent (B50) by the end of 2020.The association painted a bleak picture of the industry going forward. The unstable petroleum prices as a result of disagreements between Russia and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic will contribute to the global economic slowdown, pushing down demand for imported vegetable oils.It also expressed worries that vegetable oil prices would fall if the outbreak lasted until Idul Fitri. Experts have predicted that COVID-19 will peak in May or June. On top of that, industries will soon face the drought season, when forest and land fires are rampant.last_img read more