South West Trains places Juniper order

first_imgUK: Contracts were exchanged on May 9 for GEC Alsthom to supply Porterbrook Leasing Co with 30 four-car electric multiple-units for lease to South West Trains – both SWT and Porterbrook are Stagecoach subsidiaries. First delivery will be in September next year, and five sets will be available for the summer timetable in May 1999. All 30 should be in service by April 2000.Intended mainly for services between London Waterloo and Reading, the 160 km/h trains will be built to GEC Alsthom’s standard Juniper design and customised to Porterbrook-SWT specifications. Each set will have 266 standard and 24 first class seats, two wheelchair spaces, two toilets and racks for two bicycles. Power doors will be from Tebel or Faiveley, and SIG may supply the end-of-set retractable gangways. Roof-mounted air-conditioning packs using heat-pump technology will come from Soprano, part of the Alcatel group.The Onix 800 traction package for 750V DC third rail operation features IGBTs, three-phase motors powering one bogie on three of the cars, and rheostatic and regenerative braking, although Railtrack’s power supply infrastructure cannot yet accept this. Bodyshells of carbon steel will have mechanically fastened ends. Total order value is £100m, of which £10m is a seven-year contract for GEC Alsthom to supply materials to SWT, which will maintain the trains. oContract facts30 four-car trainsFirst delivered May 1999All in service by April 2000160 km/h266 standard/24 first seatsOnix 800 traction packageTotal value: £100m, (includes £10m spares supply deal)last_img read more

PensionsEurope calls for further delay to data reporting requirements

first_imgEurope’s top pensions lobby group has called for a 12-month delay to the implementation of EU-wide reporting requirements for pension funds.PensionsEurope also warned that data reporting rules proposed by the European Central Bank (ECB) and the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) placed a “big financial burden” on some pension funds.Many of its members would not be ready to comply by December 2019 when the requirements are due to come into force, PensionsEurope said in response to a consultation on the proposals.“In many countries pension funds would need more time to adapt their reporting systems to the new requirements in order that their implementation costs will not become enormously high, and therefore we propose to postpone the first reporting at least by one year,” the group stated. A delay was particularly important given EIOPA’s decision to require reporting using the “extensible business reporting language” (XBRL) online framework. Although it is in use for Solvency II reporting for insurance companies, PensionsEurope said pension schemes would require “not only new software solutions, but a completely different know-how [for] employees”.“Reporting for EIOPA and ECB is an additional cost factor to the detriment of beneficiaries and sponsoring companies”The group acknowledged several concessions made by the central bank and EIOPA, including estimating quarterly liability calculations themselves and collecting information from national regulators. However, PensionsEurope also reiterated its primary concerns that the reporting requirements would place a major financial burden on pension funds, and urged the ECB and EIOPA to gather as much data as possible from national regulators instead of directly from schemes.It has repeatedly warned EIOPA and the ECB of the cost and administrative burdens data reporting could pose to pension schemes.Some pension funds do not have access to “granular” information on their investments from their asset managers, PensionsEurope added, and should not be forced to pay for “expensive licenses” to access such data.“We would like to stress that statistical reporting and collecting information always contain costs for pension funds, so it should be very carefully considered which information is relevant and needed, and how often they should be reported,” the lobby group stated.“Any extra costs will be [ultimately] paid by the sponsor and/or members and beneficiaries… Increasing regulation and other requirements make occupational pensions more expensive, making it less likely that pension schemes are being set up and contributions paid.”It added that the new requirements would be “additional reports without any chance of simplification or elimination for reporting requirements that already must be fulfilled nationally”.“The reporting for EIOPA and ECB is therefore an additional cost factor, in the low-interest [rate] environment, to the detriment of the beneficiaries and sponsoring companies,” PensionsEurope concluded.PensionsEurope’s full response can be found here.last_img read more

ICC World Cup Chris Gayle survives not once but twice to Mitchell Starc – All thanks to DRS

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: Chris Gayle has been in tremendous form in the last couple of months. His exhibition of hitting in the series against England and in the game against Pakistan had made him the Chris Gayle of old – Feared for his destructive ability. Australia knew that if their total of 289 had to be defended, Gayle had to be dismissed cheaply. In the third over bowled by left-arm pacer Mitchell Starc, there was action right from the first ball and the Australians were having a hard time in dislodging the universe boss. It all started with the second ball of the over.Starc bowled a short and wide ball outside off, Gayle mistimed the cut shot and it landed just in front of point. The fourth ball was a ripping bouncer which leapt up and Gayle got the glove which flew over skipper Alex Carey. The fifth ball was a full and straight ball just outside off, Gayle went for the drive and got beaten. The Australian players appealed and umpire Gaffaney gave it out. Gayle opted for the review and Real-Time Snicko showed no spike and the ball hit the off stump. The bail was not dislodged and the decision was overturned. Chris Gayle overturned the decision twice thanks to DRS.Australia reached 288 thanks to Nathan Coulter-Nile’s 92.Steve Smith smashed 73, his 20th fifty. highlights Immediately, on the next ball, Starc fired a yorker on the middle and leg stump and umpire Gaffaney gave it out. Gayle stared for a long time and once again opted for the review. Replays showed that the impact itself was outside leg and was missing the stumps. It looked like it would be Gayle’ time in Trent Bridge.The anger that Gayle was feeling was taken out on Pat Cummins as he was hit for three fours in one over. In the process, Gayle went past Mark Waugh and Sourav Ganguly’s record of most runs in the World Cup to go past 1000 runs. The battle resumed in the fourth over when Starc bowled a yorker to Gayle and the left-hander dug it out for a couple to deep square leg. However, the bowler did not give up and bowled a full ball that swung back in late and Gayle was rapped on the back pad.Umpire Gaffaney gave it out again and Gayle belatedly opted for the review. The ball was clipping leg stump and he was given his marching orders. Gayle was not third time lucky but Starc showed his class as West Indies suffered a big jolt in their chase of 289 in the ICC Cricket World Cup clash in Trent Bridge.  last_img read more

A good start goes bad quickly for Felix Pena in Angels’ loss

first_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros “The pitches weren’t quite exactly where he wanted them to be, and those guys got too much barrel on them,” Scioscia said.The game spoiled a good streak for Peña, who is trying to establish a role for himself for 2019.After being a reliever for the past few years, the Angels moved him into the rotation and he’s flourished. He’s switched from a four-seam fastball to a two-seamer, used his changeup more and at times flashed a dominant slider. Coming into the game, hitters had swung and missed at his slider 49.7 percent of the time, making it the 11th toughest slider to hit in the majors.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Peña fell behind Nick Martini, 2-and-0, and then gave up a single. Peña’s first pitch to Matt Chapman was over the inner half of the plate, and Chapman shot it up the middle for a single.Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.Next, Peña actually threw a good changeup, down and away to left-handed hitting Jed Lowrie, who was still able to get good enough wood on it to drive it the opposite way, off the wall, for a two-run double.Khris Davis then reached on an infield hit and Matt Olson walked, loading the bases.Like he did to Lowrie, Peña went away to the right-handed hitting Stephen Piscotty. and he cranked it off the right-field fence, for a two-run double.Peña then left a fastball over the middle to Ramón Laureano, who whacked it up the middle for an RBI single. After a sacrifice fly, the A’s had taken a 6-0 lead.center_img Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter PreviousAngels starting pitcher Felix Pena throws to the plate during the first inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani swings and misses a pitch from Oakland Athletics’ Brett Anderson in the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Oakland Athletics pitcher Brett Anderson works against the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Angels pitcher Felix Pena works against the Oakland Athletics in the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Felix Pena works against the Oakland Athletics during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Oakland Athletics’ Stephen Piscotty follows through on a two-run double off Los Angeles Angels’ Felix Pena during the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 19: Jabari Blash #54 of the Los Angeles Angels can not catch a ball hit by Stephen Piscotty #25 of the Oakland Athletics in the fourth inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 19, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)Oakland Athletics’ Jed Lowrie drops his bat after hitting a two-run double off Los Angeles Angels’ Felix Pena during the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 19: Felix Pena #64 of the Los Angeles Angels looks at the ball after giving up two runs on a double in the fourth inning against the Oakland Athletics at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 19, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)Oakland Athletics’ Ramon Laureano swings for an RBI single off Los Angeles Angels’ Felix Pena in the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Angels pitching coach Charles Nagy, center, speaks with pitcher Felix Pena (64) during the fourth inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Oakland Athletics’ Matt Chapman prepares to slide as Los Angeles Angels catcher Joe Hudson waits for the ball during the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 19: Matt Chapman #26 of the Oakland Athletics slides safely past Joe Hudson #44 of the Los Angeles Angels to score on a hit by Jed Lowrie #8 in the fourth inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 19, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)Oakland Athletics’ Matt Chapman (26) and Nick Martini (38) are congratulated after scoring against the Los Angeles Angels during the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 19: Jed Lowrie #8 of the Oakland Athletics hits a double the scores two runs in the fourth inning against the Los Angeles Angels at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 19, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)OAKLAND, CA – SEPTEMBER 19: Jefry Marte #19 of the Los Angeles Angels an not make a play on a ball hit by Khris Davis #2 of the Oakland Athletics in the fourth inning at Oakland Alameda Coliseum on September 19, 2018 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)Oakland’s Stephen Piscotty watches the flight of his three-run home run during the fifth inning of Wednesday’s game against the Angels in Oakland. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)Angels relief pitcher Parker Bridwell, right, waits for Oakland’s Stephen Piscotty, left, to circle the bases on a three-run home run during the fifth inning of Wednesday’s game in Oakland. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Angels starting pitcher Felix Pena throws to the plate during the first inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani swings and misses a pitch from Oakland Athletics’ Brett Anderson in the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)NextShow Caption1 of 18Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani swings and misses a pitch from Oakland Athletics’ Brett Anderson in the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)ExpandOAKLAND — Felix Peña’s performance on Wednesday night was Exhibit A about how difficult it is to pitch in the big leagues.For three innings, Peña was as good as could be, but in the fourth inning he gave up six runs, which was more than enough to send the Angels on their way to a 10-0 loss to the Oakland A’s.Peña retired the first nine Oakland hitters on 25 pitches, with barely even a ball hit hard. At that point, he looked like the guy who had a 2.76 ERA in his previous eight starts.“In the first three innings he was doing a lot of the same stuff he’s been doing,” Manager Mike Scioscia said. “I thought he had a nice mix of pitches. In the fourth, he had trouble commanding counts and putting guys away and those guys, when they got a fastball to hit, hit it hard.” One night’s poor results notwithstanding, he’s still opened eyes with his 16 starts. He still has a 4.01 ERA in those games. He gave up 13 runs in two of his 83 innings as a starter.Peña gave up seven runs in the first inning against the Seattle Mariners on July 29, and he bounced back and pitched well after that, which he took as encouragement after this outing.“It was just a bad outing,” Peña said through an interpreter. “I put it behind me. The idea is to keep working hard and keep making progress.”After Peña came out, another pitcher trying to get himself onto the 2019 depth chart had a rough inning.Parker Bridwell gave up a three-run homer to Piscotty. Bridwell has now allowed 22 earned runs in 8-2/3 innings in his career against the A’s, while posting a 3.07 ERA in 120-1/3 innings against everyone else. Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros last_img read more