Looking for his big break

first_imgDerek Mueller sang and acted his way through four years at Harvard, and now, with Commencement looming, he’s taking his show on the road.Mueller, a senior psychology concentrator and Mather House resident, spent the past three years as a member of the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, the nation’s oldest collegiate theatrical troupe, known for its annual burlesque show and for its traditional roasts of a Man and Woman of the Year, selected from the ranks of the world’s top entertainers.For the past year, Mueller served as Hasty Pudding’s cast vice president, helping guide the creative process that led to this year’s production, “Commie Dearest,” a heartfelt tale (not really) about a young girl (a man) in the 1950s suburbs, joining forces with communists to fight misogyny and win the American Dream. Mueller played “Olive Lucy,” the owner of the local bowling alley (what could be more American?) where the townspeople congregated.With work on next year’s production beginning in the spring, Mueller said Hasty Pudding dominated his time at Harvard, though he also spent his freshman year with the Krokodiloes, Harvard’s oldest a cappella singing group. Mueller said the Krokodiloes’ extensive summer tour allowed him to see countries on six continents.The Hasty Pudding Theatricals experience is so consuming that each spring when the year’s performance — which includes a spring break tour to New York and Bermuda — is over, Mueller said he finds himself at loose ends.“After the show ends and I get back from Bermuda, I don’t know what to do with my time. I wander about like a lost puppy,” Mueller said.Of course this year, with graduation looming, Mueller has a bit more to contemplate. When asked his plans, Mueller said without hesitation, “I want to be a pop singer.” He plans to embrace the vagaries of fame, fortune, and the entertainment industry and head west after graduation to Los Angeles, where he’ll work the phones and Internet and see what happens.After describing his plan, Mueller, who hails from Cincinnati, hastens to say that he’s not normally as impulsive as the plan sounds, but that it’s time for him to make this kind of a move and it’s one he’s excited about.Mueller has been interested in music since he was young. On arriving at Harvard, he decided not to pursue a music degree because it is focused on theory and he is more interested in performance. Psychology allows him to understand people better, which helps in acting. In addition to his time with the Krokodiloes and Hasty Pudding Theatricals, Mueller composed, sang, and played piano on his own. He acknowledges that the Hasty Pudding’s style is different from his own music, but he relishes the Pudding experience nonetheless.When asked what advice he’d give incoming freshmen, Mueller advises them not to listen to any.“Make your own mistakes,” Mueller said. “Trying to apply what others learned from their mistakes will short-circuit your own experience.”last_img read more

Twitter advises 5,000 global employees to work from home

first_imgTwitter’s policy on working from home is a step beyond what most companies in the US are doing as the virus spreads. Many, including AT&T Inc. and Citigroup Inc., have restricted international travel, especially to Asia. Others including Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google have postponed or canceled conferences in the US, and Facebook joined Twitter Monday in pulling out of South by Southwest. But Twitter’s suggestion for remote work is more reminiscent of what companies did in Asia as the virus swept the region.That’s probably because Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey is a big proponent of remote work, and has already announced plans to spend as much as six months working from Africa in 2020. “While this is a big change for us, we have already been moving toward a more distributed workforce that’s increasingly remote,” Twitter wrote Monday.Square Inc., the other public company that Dorsey leads, is also asking employees to work from home. On Monday, Square executive Aaron Zamost wrote in a tweet that the company is implementing a “strongly encouraged work-from-home policy.”A handful of Twitter workers tweeted praise for the decision, applauding Dorsey for prioritizing employee health. Many of their tweets included the hashtag #webackjack, doubling as support for a CEO under attack from activist investors who may try to replace him. Topics : Twitter Inc. is “strongly encouraging” its almost 5,000 global employees to work from home due to concerns over the spread of the Covid-19 coronavirus, the company said Monday.The social media company made the suggestion as part of a blog update one day after it suspended all non-critical travel for workers, including pulling out of the South by Southwest conference scheduled for later this month in Austin, Texas.Twitter says it’s mandatory for employees in Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea to work from home, but that other offices will remain open for those who choose or need to come in. “We are working to make sure internal meetings, all hands, and other important tasks are optimized for remote participation,” the company wrote on its blog.last_img read more

Governor Wolf Statement on Supreme Court Ruling on Education Funding

first_img Education,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today released a statement regarding equitable education funding in Pennsylvania following the Supreme Court’s ruling.“Today’s ruling presents an opportunity to further assure that students in Pennsylvania have access to a fair education system regardless of their zip code,” Governor Wolf said. “While we have made progress to invest hundreds of millions more in our schools and enact a fair funding formula that takes into account the needs of students in their districts, we know more must be done. This ruling validates my long-held position that the commonwealth must further examine the equity and adequacy of public school funding.”Governor Wolf has steadfastly fought to address education funding in Pennsylvania, especially for struggling and disadvantaged districts, having secured more than $800 million in new funding in the past three years alone. Governor Wolf Statement on Supreme Court Ruling on Education Funding September 28, 2017center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more