Virginia: Lindsay Ryland to retire as director of transition ministry

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Diocese of Virginia] Lindsay Ryland, director of transition ministry, has announced plans to retire in September 2014, after 13 years of service on diocesan staff.Lindsay joined the staff in 2001 to serve as assistant for deployment, and became the diocesan deployment officer in 2003. She has worked with parishes in search of clergy as well as clergy in search of new ministries.Lindsay is a member of Immanuel, Old Church, in Hanover County. Her ministry in the wider Church includes serving as a member of the Transition Ministry Conference executive committee and the Board for Transition Ministry, and as a CREDO faculty member. She is a volunteer reader at the Virginia Voice in Richmond and has served as president of the Hanover County Historical Society, as well as in a number of positions with the Mary Baldwin College Alumnae Association. Prior to joining diocesan staff, she served as a senior vice president at Bank of America.“In her years on staff, Lindsay has built a reputation – both in Virginia and across the Episcopal Church – for excellence in ministry,” said Bishop Johnston. “She has been a pastoral and professional presence for hundreds of clergy and scores of congregations in times of transition. I am most grateful for her unique combination of passion, dedication, knowledge and skill. She has been not only a most valued colleague, but also a good friend.”Parishes who are currently involved in search processes can be assured that they will continue to receive support from the bishop’s office as they continue their discernment in calling new clergy. The Bishop will soon start a search for a new staff member to work in the transition ministry field. Posted Jun 25, 2014 Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (1) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 June 26, 2014 at 8:19 pm Lindsay Ryland has been an extraordinary resource for our diocese who will be greatly missed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 People Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virginia: Lindsay Ryland to retire as director of transition ministry Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 martha knight says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Guardian Ministries: ONE = UNITY

first_img Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe Faith Leader Q&A Interview Guardian Ministries: ONE = UNITY By DAVID L. ANTION, GUARDIAN MINISTRIES Published on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 | 11:02 am Top of the News Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Paul makes this unifying statement in Ephesians 4: “There is one body and one Spirit, just as also you were called in one hope of your calling; one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all who is over all and through all and in all” (Ephesians 4:4-6 NAU). In verse 3 Paul urged that we “preserve the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.”We are already unified. But how? Some are in that organization or church group and some are in this. But we all have ONE God and Father who is over all, in all and through all!What if a husband and wife had 8 children? Suppose the children all grew to maturity when the parents died. All the siblings fought over the inheritance and split apart with anger and hostility not speaking to one another and not ever seeing one another. Are they still blood relatives? Do they have the same DNA? Did they all come from the same father and mother? No matter how many miles separated them or how many issues divided them, they are still all members of the same (one) family. That is a fact.So how could Paul make the statement that we are unified and we need to preserve it? He already knew from the other apostles about the unity of Christ and the Father. And because God the Father and Jesus Christ are one (John 10:30), this unity becomes the basis of our unity with them: “What we have seen and heard we proclaim to you also, so that you too may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father, and with His Son Jesus Christ” (1 John 1:3 NAU). This is the basis of our fellowship with each other. It makes us one (John 17:11). Remember that the Son does the will of the Father (John 4:34) and has received the powers even of judgment.The Son obeys the Father’s will and has received a command from the Father that concerns His death and resurrection and He willingly lays down His own life (John 10:18). Because the Son obeys we must realize that to remain in Jesus or in the Father we also must be obedient in a spirit of love. Jesus said, “If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love; just as I have kept My Father’s commandments and abide in His love (John 15:10 NAS).Loving one another is the way to remain in His love. “No one has seen God at any time; if we love one another, God abides in us, and His love is perfected in us” (1 John 4:12 NAS). Also we read, “We have come to know and have believed the love which God has for us. God is love, and the one who abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him” 1 John 4:16 NAU).When we are unified with God and His Son we bear fruit. “I am the vine, you are the branches; he who abides in Me and I in him, he bears much fruit, for apart from Me you can do nothing” (John 15:5). Being in unity with God and His Son also helps us to escape the pollutions of the world and its lusts. “For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the lust of the eyes and the boastful pride of life, is not from the Father, but is from the world. The world is passing away, and also its lusts; but the one who does the will of God lives forever” (I John 2:16-17 NAS).It is the unity of the Father and Son and our unity with them that prevents anyone or anything from snatching us away from their love. “For I am convinced that neither death, no life, no angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, no height, nor depth, nor any other created thing, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:38-39 NAS).God’s love is in Christ and expressed through Christ. When we are in unity with them we abide in His love. Thus we abide in both the Father and the Son. And as long as we choose to abide in the Father and the Son no person or power can take us away from them. This is true of each one of us individually and it is true of all of us (the Body of Christ) collectively! That’s why the gates of Hades cannot prevail against Christ’s church!Praise be to God for the unity we have in the Father and the Son and for the everlasting love and commitment to us.— David L. Antion for Guardian MinistriesGuardian Ministries, P.O. Box 50734, Pasadena, CA. 91115 or visit daveantion.com. HerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyGained Back All The Weight You Lost?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Beauty Secrets Only Indian Women KnowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Celebrity Body Parts Insured For Ridiculous AmountsHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img 47 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Business News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. More Cool Stuff Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Moot points, well made

first_imgThe experience of earlier moot court contests and many hours of rigorous study can seem to melt into the ether when surviving third-year Harvard Law School (HLS) students face not just any panel of esteemed judges but one led by a U.S. Supreme Court justice.On Thursday, the teams in the showdown round of the Ames Moot Court Competition tried to persuade a panel headed by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to change the law of the land.That’s what student Jessica Palmer was trying to do when she argued that her fictional client was protected by the First Amendment even though he lied when claiming in an online dating profile that he was awarded the Navy Cross for service as a SEAL in the first Gulf War. Palmer’s client in the test case sampling thorny, unsettled legal issues was convicted of violating the Stolen Valor Act, which punishes lies about receiving military honors.Under questioning from Sotomayor about why the Supreme Court couldn’t just apply recent rulings on First Amendment issues to this case, Palmer offered, “Madam Justice, you could find that.”A broad smile spread across the Supreme Court justice’s face as she said, “We could do whatever we may.”Sotomayor later acknowledged that she and her brethren are a tough crowd for petitioners when she addressed the Austin Hall audience that included many student contenders defeated in earlier moot court rounds: “For all you who think you could have done a better job, come up front and give us a try.”“This is really hard. The hardest thing you could do as a lawyer is to argue before the Supreme Court,” said Sotomayor, who was the newest justice on the court until former HLS Dean Elena Kagan was confirmed last year. “You have learned your skills well. Your performance gives me hope for the profession.”The panel — which included Chief Judge Frank H. Easterbrook of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit Court and Peter J. Rubin, J.D. ’88, of the Massachusetts Court of Appeals — did not decide the merits or the law of the case. But it ruled Matthew Greenfield of the prosecution team the best oralist, and Greenfield and Caroline Anderson the winners of the oral competition. The best brief award went to Palmer and to Adam Hallowell’s team, which included students Avis Bohlen, Yvonne Saadi, Matthew Scarola, and Benjamin Watson. The prosecution team also included Stephen Pezzi, Mitchell Reich, Stephanie Simon, and Noah Weiss.Oralists Matthew Greenfield and Caroline Anderson were on the Belva Ann Lockwood Memorial Team.In the case, a man named Otis Garfield had an online profile that boasted he’d twice climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, tracked lions in Botswana, and won the Navy Cross — even though his Gulf War experience inspired him to spread the message that “loving America means speaking out against — not fighting in — unnecessary wars.”In the example, Garfield was prosecuted after a woman who dated him reported his false claims about the medal to law enforcement, and he received a prison term despite a trial judge’s error in failing to allow him to speak at his sentencing.The questioning took an entertaining twist when Rubin challenged the student lawyers on the impact of Garfield’s lies. “Didn’t he lie to women asking them to rely on those lies in attempt to secure a date? I know my time is valuable, and I assume yours is. Why isn’t this fraud?”Palmer said that she couldn’t invoke a fraud claim because the lower court did not make that finding, and there was no monetary loss to Garfield’s victims.To reach the final round of the century-old Ames competition, students face off in three rounds over two years. In the beginning, there are 40 teams, but only two teams of six advance to the final competition.In announcing the winners, Sotomayor might well have been referring to rulings on the high court as well: “You force us to make choices that are never easy, but we have to break the ties.”last_img read more

Dzumhur plays Semi-finals of the ATP Challenger Tournament in Blois Today

first_imgDamir Dzumhur, best tennis player in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) will today play the semi-finals of the ATP Challenger Tournament in Blois, France. Dzumhur’s opponent, will be French Alexandre Muller (327 ATP).Bosnian best tennis player, ranked 94th on the ATP list, will fight for the semi-finals and for 43,000 Euros worth tournament.Previously, Estonian Jurgen Zoop won , while in 2nd round Dzumhur defeated Canadian Felix Auger Aliassim (231 ATP) with 6: 7 (4), 6: 3, 6: 4.Match between Dzumhur and Muller is playing today from 11 am.(Source: fena)last_img read more