What we’re reading: Cohen sues Trump

first_imgFacebook What we’re reading: Chauvin found guilty in Floyd case, Xi to attend Biden’s climate change summit ReddIt Mitchell Lefevrehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mitchell-lefevre/ Better Together learns new ways to improve interfaith dialogue on campus Facebook Linkedin Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Michael Cohen headlines a heavy week of White House-related news. Photo by Julie Jacobson, Associated Press. Mitchell Lefevre is a sports broadcasting major from Los Angeles, California. A very big sports fan, he would love to one day be an announcer or sports show talent. Twitter + posts What we’re reading: Another impending shutdown printWe’re back and we’re reading everything from “Fox News” to the “Washington Post.” We’re trying to help you keep up with the rapid pace of politics and everyday news. Today, we’ve got a lot of White House and President Trump-related things, with Michael Cohen, Paul Manafort and Bill Shine all making headlines.Cohen sues Trump OrganizationAccordingto the AssociatedPress, Michael Cohen filed a lawsuit against the Trump Organization.The president’s former lawyer claimed the Trump Organization did not pay his legal bills like they promised. Cohen said he is owed at least $1.9 million.Cohen’slawsuit said the Trump Organization had stopped paying his legal bills after hestarted cooperating with federal prosecutors in the Russia investigation.The TrumpOrganization has not yet commented on the lawsuit.Paul Manafort sentenced to 47 monthsin prisonPresidentDonald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was sentenced to almostfour years in prison after he was found guilty on eight accounts of bank andtax fraud, according to FoxNews.Theconviction made Manafort the first campaign associate of Donald Trump to befound guilty during the Robert Mueller probe.The nine months Manafort has already served will be counted toward the sentence, and he was also given a $50,000 fine.This is notit, however, for Manafort, as he is still facing prison time from another casein which he plead guilty to foreign lobbying violations and witness tampering.  It is possible he could be sentenced to 24years in prison with a $24 million fine for the second case.Facebook announces plans to blockanti-vaccination contentFacebooksaid it is going to start blocking the spread of misinformation about vaccines,according to CBSNews.The companyfaced a lot of criticism for being a vessel to spread false information aboutvaccinations during the measles outbreak in the Pacific Northwest.Facebookhas said it will start rejecting ads with vaccine misinformation, as well ascutting down on posts that contain incorrect data.Additionally,the tech giant said it will share educational material on vaccinations to userswho have come across false information.House of Representatives passesresolution condemning anti-Semitism and anti-Muslim discriminationOnThursday, the House of Representatives passed a resolution that condemnsanti-Semite and anti-Muslim hate and intolerance, according to CNN.The resolutionpassed with a 407-23 vote, with all 23 ‘no’ votes coming from Republicans.SomeRepublicans, however, are not happy with the resolution because it did not addresscondemning Ilhan Omar, D- Minn., who was criticized recently for makinganti-Semitic comments on Twitter.DemocraticRep. Eliot Engel, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said hewished there was a separate resolution just about anti-Semitism, but at least somethingwas passed to address hatred and bigotry.White House Communications DirectorBill Shine resignsAccordingto the WashingtonExaminer, White House Communications Director Bill Shine has resigned. President Trumpaccepted Shine’s resignation Thursday evening, and Shine will join Trump’scampaign as a senior adviser. Thepresident praised Shine and said he looks forward to working together on the2020 campaign.Shine wasthe co-president of Fox News before becoming the White House Commutations Directorin July 2018.Kentucky school districts close duringprotestsAccordingto ABCNews, at least four Kentucky school districts had to close as hundreds ofteachers called in sick to protest public education proposals by the statelegislature.This is thethird time in the past week that a school district has had to close because ofteachers not going to work.Kentuckyhas joined California, Colorado, and West Virginia as states where publicschool teachers have gone on massive strikes.In all cases, the teachers say there is not enough money going to support public education.That’s all we have for today. Previous articleWomen’s basketball to rely on senior leadership in Big 12 tournamentNext articleReview: ‘Alita: Battle Angel’ tells a meandering story with stunning visuals, anime action Mitchell Lefevre RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Mitchell Lefevre Twitter Mitchell Lefevrehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mitchell-lefevre/ What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlines ReddItlast_img read more

French court bans Reporters Without Borders from using photo of dead Cuban leader “Che” Guevara

first_img Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internet October 12, 2018 Find out more News A Paris court today banned Reporters Without Borders and the French advertising agency Rampazzo from using a world-famous photo of Cuban guerrilla leader Ernesto “Che” Guevara wearing a beret with a red star on it. The organisation warned that if it did not lodge an appeal, it would find new ways to publicise the plight of the 30 journalists currently imprisoned in Cuba and try to win their release. RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago Organisation A Paris court today banned Reporters Without Borders and the French advertising agency Rampazzo from using a world-famous photo of Cuban guerrilla leader Ernesto “Che” Guevara wearing a beret with a red star on it. The ban was at the request of Diane Diaz Lopez, daughter and heir of the late Cuban photographer Alberto Diaz Gutierrez, known as Korda, who took the picture. “We deplore this court decision, which plays into the hands of the Cuban authorities,” said the organisation’s secretary-general, Robert Ménard. “We especially regret that the complaint against us, which concerns the principle of the right to use photos, did not include discussion of the broader issue of the appalling state of press freedom and human rights in Cuba.” The grounds for the ban would be examined before a decision to appeal was made.He said the organisation would obey the ban and suspend a planned 8-22 July poster campaign using the photo. But he he warned that if it did not lodge an appeal, it would find new ways to publicise the plight of the 30 journalists currently imprisoned in Cuba and try to win their release.The judge who issued the ban set a fine of 200 euros for every time it was infringed and said the photo must be removed from the Reporters Without Borders website. The organisation was ordered to pay 1,000 euros in damages to the plaintiff as well as 1,000 euros in costs. However the judge refused Mrs Diaz Lopez’ request for the verdict to be published at Reporters Without Borders’ expense in five French national daily papers and on its website.The lawsuit had sought to “stop publication, distribution and sale” of the photo which was to have been used in a poster campaign about lack of press freedom in Cuba aimed at the 120,000 or so French people who each year go on holiday to Cuba, drawn by the sun, the beaches or the legend of the Cuban Revolution. The planned campaign poster showed Guevara’s face superimposed on a famous image of a policeman brandishing a truncheon and a shield that became famous in the 1968 student uprising in France. The caption said: “Welcome to Cuba, the world’s biggest prison for journalists.”Behind the ideology of the Cuban revolution, which still inspires many tourists, is the reality of a totalitarian regime which uses the image of “Che” in an effort to legitimise repression. The poster also shows how a revolution that inspired a entire generation in the 1960s has now turned into what that generation most detested – a police state. Mrs Diaz Lopez said Reporters Without Borders could not “plead press freedom to distort Korda’s work for their political and advertising purposes.” Korda’s photograph of Che in Havana in 1960 “represented and still represents a symbol of struggle and the future for the Cuban people,” she said. The Cuban government launched a nationwide crackdown on 18 March in which 75 dissidents were rounded up and sentenced to prison terms of up to 28 years each for “undermining the unity and sovereignty of the state” or its “independence.” They included 26 independent journalists who joined four others already in jail. Cuba thus became the world’s biggest prison for journalists. The heavy punishment of these journalists who have challenged the state’s monopoly of information has been extended by sending them to prisons hundreds of miles from their homes, restricting visits from their families and keeping them in bad conditions of detention. CubaAmericas RSF_en to go further Follow the news on Cuba CubaAmericas New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council October 15, 2020 Find out more May 6, 2020 Find out more News July 9, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 French court bans Reporters Without Borders from using photo of dead Cuban leader “Che” Guevara News Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Newslast_img read more