Bible Reading Marathon begins Sunday

first_img Bible Reading Marathon begins Sunday Each reader is asked to read for 15 minutes but readers may reserve more reading time.Groups often reserve large blocks of time. Some people like to read at several different times and on different days or nights, Adams said. Readers are especially needed during the late-night and early morning hours.Those who would like to read but have not signed up may call the Salem-Troy Baptist Association at 566-1538 today or 344 1050 beginning Sunday afternoon or email [email protected] Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Adams said the opportunity to read God’s word aloud and publically is a blessing that is denied to many around the world.“We, as Americans, are blessed to be able to share the Bible in a public setting,” she said. “The response to the Bible Reading Marathon continues to be strong. People of all ages and from all walks of life come to read the Bible and hear God’s word.”Readers include churches, clubs, organizations, school groups, individuals and families.“It’s so encouraging that families are coming together to read,” Adams said. “Some of the younger children don’t read for an entire 15-minute interval but they read. Every reader is a blessing and it’s very special to hear God’s word through the voices of children.” Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Linda Adams, Salem-Troy Baptist Association administrator, said the Bible Reading Marathon is a non-denominational event and all believers are invited to come and read and/or hear God’s word read aloud and publically.The Bible Reading Marathon will begin Sunday with the reading of the words: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.”Adams said God’s word will continue to be read until the noon hour on Thursday. Book Nook to reopen By Jaine Treadwell You Might Like Measles making a comeback in the Southeast In the wake of reports of cases of measles around the country, the concern is moving closer to home. Reports… read more By The Penny Hoarder Print Articlecenter_img Latest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The 2019 Bible Reading Marathon will begin 7 p.m. Sunday at the Gazebo on the Square in downtown Troy.St. John Baptist Church will lead the singing of old-time hymns beginning at 6 p.m. and there will be a time of prayer before the reading of God’s word.This will be the 13th year for the Bible Reading Marathon that is sponsored annually by the International Bible Reading Association and hosted locally by the Salem-Troy Baptist Association. Sponsored Content The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Published 3:00 am Monday, April 29, 2019 Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Email the author Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Pres. Faust calls global health one of her main priorities for Harvard;

first_imgDeclaring the University’s efforts toimprove the state of global health knowledge, education, and capacity building to be one of her “very highestpriorities” as president of Harvard, Drew Faust today announced theappointment of Sue J. Goldie, Roger Irving Lee Professor of Public Health and director of the Center for Health DecisionScience at the Harvard School of Public Health, as the director of theHarvard Institute for Global Health (HIGH).Faust also announced that the workof HIGH is so integral to the long-term focus and goals of Harvard that theorganization that began its existence as an experimental faculty “initiative”has been granted permanent institute status.“I believe that this is truly a moment of specialpossibility for global health, both in the world and here at Harvard,” saidFaust. “If we needed to be reminded of this, we have been this past year, firstwith the global H1N1 pandemic, and then when the earthquake struck Haiti and wesaw the world come together.“We need to engage and equip our students, who aretelling us in ever increasing numbers that they want to engage in the globalhealth effort,” Faust continued. “We need to support the very best researchersand the work of our outstanding faculty, in fields stretching across thespectrum of inquiry from immunology to epidemiology, health policy, history,molecular biology, and philosophy. I have every confidence that Sue Goldie, whohas already demonstrated her outstanding scholarship, leadership, andcollaborative skills, is the person to lead this special effort.”The appointment ofGoldie, a MacArthur Foundation “genius award” recipient, marks the end of ayearlong, international search for a new director for HIGH. Goldie has beeninvolved with HIGH since 2007, and as co-director of the executive committeeworked to bring faculty from all parts of the University together, consistentlyadvocating on behalf of junior faculty interested in global health.Because HIGH isabove all a collaborative organization dedicated to educating and training thenext generation of global healthleaders, Faust also appointed two faculty leaders to direct thecritically important educational and training efforts.Paul Farmer, the Maude and LillianPresley Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard MedicalSchool (HMS), will oversee global health medical education and physiciantraining. Farmer, who is also a MacArthur Fellowship winner, is chair of the Department ofGlobal Health and Social Medicine at HMS, a professor in the Department ofGlobal Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health,Chief of the Division ofGlobal Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital,and isperhaps best known internationally as the co-founder of Partners In Health,the global nonprofit health care delivery organization.David Cutler, the Otto EcksteinProfessor of Applied Economics in Harvard’s Department of Economics and amember of the faculty of the Harvard Kennedy School, will direct undergraduateand graduate programs in global health. Cutler, who worked on health carereform in the Clinton administration and served as a health care adviser to theObama campaign, is a member of HIGH’s faculty executive committee, served asHIGH’s interim director for the past year, and led the effort to create a secondaryconcentration in global health at Harvard College.Goldie said, “Strong leadership inglobal health already resides in the faculty of the Medical School, School ofPublic Health, and academic hospitals. As the faculty director for the HarvardInstitute for Global Health, I see myself principally as a coordinator,facilitator, and collaborator. With a leadership team comprised of myself, PaulFarmer, and David Cutler, I am confident we can create a University-wide community that is bound by a sense of sharedmission.”“Global health is an intellectual and practicaltopic of tremendous interest to our undergraduate and graduate students,”said Michael D. Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and JohnH. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Professors Goldie,Farmer, and Cutler are exactly the kind of seasoned leaders we need for such animportant, University-wide institute. I am also thrilled that each bringsto the institute a deep commitment to Harvard’s extensive educational offeringsin global health.”Harvard Provost Steven E. Hymansaid that granting institute status to HIGH and appointing Goldie “mark a verysignificant step along what has been a 15-year journey toward a trulycollaborative and more interdisciplinary Harvard. Global health is an area inwhich we already have world-class researchers, clinicians, teachers, andstudents,” Hyman said. “By bringing them all together as parts of a coordinatedwhole, without boundaries or silos, we expect to have far more impact than wewould expect from the already considerable sum of the many parts of our globalhealth effort.”“It is my convictionthat for Harvard to remain a leader in the burgeoningfield of global health, we must invest heavily in linking service to trainingand research,” Farmer said. “Since global health is not a discipline, butrather a collection of problems, we need to draw on the strengths of themedical school, the school of public health and the teaching hospitals—andespecially on the work of our partner sites—to help tackle the biggestchallenge of our time: understanding and improving delivery of services in thiscountry and in others. Global health is a new paradigm and very different fromits predecessor paradigm, international health. Boston is on the globe,too,” Farmer noted.Cutler said he sees HIGHcoordinating the teaching and training of students at all levels. “Forundergraduates, this means having courses for those who want to learn a little,up to those who want to make global health their life’s focus,” he said. “Italso means providing students with the ability to interact with the world andpractice what they learn. For graduate students, this involves direct trainingin global health issues, access to people and research sites, and integrationof the skills of many different disciplines. It will take a collaboration offaculty all across Harvard to make this happen. I know the faculty are eager toparticipate, and I look forward to helping organize them.”The global health leadershipappointments were praised by both Julio Frenk, dean of the Harvard School ofPublic Health, and Jeffrey Flier, dean of Harvard Medical School.“SueGoldie, Paul Farmer, and David Cutler are uniquely qualified to lead HIGH to anew stage of development,” Frenk said.  “The key to achieving successfullythe Institute’s mission will continue to be the ability to build bridges acrossthe amazing intellectual capital of the entire university. Professors Goldie,Farmer, and Cutler have exceptional skills in team building and mentoring.They are also deeply committed to the educational mission of HIGH, asdemonstrated by their crucial role in expanding the course offerings in globalhealth and by their own dedication to teaching.”Flier said, “This is a signalmoment in our effort to bring together under a single banner the disparateparts of a world-class program in global health. I have no doubt that SueGoldie, Paul Farmer, and David Cutler have the vision, collaborative instincts,and determination to bring people together in this common cause, and thattogether they will create a truly collaborative, interdisciplinary program thatwill benefit not only all the world’s peoples, but also will benefit Harvard asa university.”Trained as a physician, decision scientist, and public healthresearcher, Goldie has broad interests that include using evidence-based policyto narrow the gap between rich and poor, leveraging science and technology astools for global diplomacy, strengthening capacity through sustainablenon-exploitative partnerships, and fostering innovation in education locally andglobally. Drawn to health problems in the mostvulnerable populations, she conducts rigorous analysis using themethods and tools of decision science, which uses mathematics to solve resourceproblems, to inform complex and difficult policy decisions. Her analytic work relates to awide range of topics — from vaccine-preventable diseases to maternal mortality— in many settings, from disparities in the United States to broad failures ofpublic health delivery in the poorest countries.An accomplishedscientist, Goldie has published 150 original research papers and hasbeen principal investigator on awards from the National Institutes of Health, theCenters for Disease Control, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the DorisDuke Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation, which in 2005awarded her its grant “for genius and creativity” in applying the tools ofdecision science to combat major public health problems.She has received numerous teachingand mentorship awards, including the Harvard School of Public Health mentoringaward and the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from HarvardUniversity. She serves on the StandingCommittee on Health Policy, teaches one of the largest classes at theSchool of Public Health in decision science, and this year also taught a newundergraduate class as part of the Gen Ed curriculum.A member of the Institute ofMedicine, Goldie is a graduate ofUnion College and Albany Medical College. She completed her internship andresidency in internal medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale UniversitySchool of Medicine, and earned her M.P.H. from the Harvard School of PublicHealth in 1997. She joined the faculty of the School of Public Health in 1998.last_img read more

Syracuse defense suffocates Army in 73-56 NCAA tournament win

first_img Published on March 18, 2016 at 7:24 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettus Army head coach Dave Magarity paced the sideline with his hands on the back of his head, then took a knee at the end of the bench to catch his breath.The game was only in its opening minutes, Syracuse led just 3-2, but the Orange press had already prevented the Black Knights from getting over halfcourt twice.Army made just one field goal in the first quarter and its leading scorer was held scoreless through the first half. SU led by as many as 30 before the midway point with 19 points off turnovers in the first 20 minutes. In a 73-56 blowout win over the No. 13 seed Black Knights (29-3, 17-1 Patriot) in the Carrier Dome on Friday, defense was the driving force behind No. 4 seed Syracuse’s (26-7, 13-3 Atlantic Coast) win.SU advanced to the Round of 32 for the third year in a row and will face 12th-seeded Albany on Sunday after the Great Danes beat fifth-seeded Florida, 61-58.“All our worst fears were realized,” Army head coach Dave Magarity said. “When I saw that pop up on the screen last Monday night this is what I was thinking. I knew how good they were and I knew how good they could be if they got into you and you allowed them to get you playing like that.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn Army’s first possession, Orange defenders stopped Brianna Johnson just before she got to half court. All of Johnson’s teammates had run down court so she had no one to pass it to. Ten-second backcourt violation.The Black Knights broke the press on their next attempt for their only basket of the opening quarter, but on the next attempt Johnson again couldn’t get it across half court.“We were overthinking it a little bit,” Magarity said, adding that his players seemed shell shocked. “I don’t think we could have been any more prepared. But being prepared and telling them what to expect, it’s hard to simulate that.”Syracuse’s plan was get the ball out of the hands of Army’s primary ball handler Kelsey Minato. It left other players open in the press, then trapped them before they could get over the halfcourt line.In the half court, a player was always in Minato’s face, even off the ball, adding a wrinkle into the usual 2-3 zone. Late in the shock clock, the Orange would switch to man-to-man, further confusing the Army players.“I didn’t get a ton of open shots. The shots I did get I probably wasn’t balanced. I washing rushing it because of their pressure,” said Minato, who would have been held to single digits for the first time in 112 games if not for two made free throws with 10 seconds left. “I’ve seen face guarding, but it wasn’t like that. They were a lot quicker, a lot more physical and it kind of got me playing out of my comfort zone.”Army is a team like Syracuse that thrives on creating pressure. The more it scores the easier it is to get into the full court sets.But as Syracuse prevented Army from scoring it effectively prevented the Black Knights from being able to get into their press and the game spiraled out of control from there.At time outs, Magarity caught his players looking up at the scoreboard. “You can’t worry about what the score is,” Magarity said. “We need to get the ball over half court.“Halftime couldn’t have come soon enough.”The halftime deficit for Army was 25 points. Only after the Orange started holding the ball and succumbing to turnovers in the second half did Army crawl within 12 points, but it was all a consolation.“We face that defense probably never,” Magarity said. “And I mean that. It’s overwhelming at times. It’s relentless and it’s really very very difficult to ever get comfortable.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more