Staff away days are too artificial to be of value

first_img Comments are closed. Now this is going to make me sound like a real killjoy, but can someoneexplain to me what an “away day” is? Yes, I know what managementteams mean when they say they are planning to have an away day but the actualpurpose of these events always seems, how should I put this – unclear. But thenmaybe that is the whole point. I am not sure what the derivation of the word is, but I seem to remember theoriginal Away day was a train ticket, launched as part of a marketing campaignby British Rail. It did not matter too much where you ended up – the whole point was just toget “away”. Anywhere away from where you were, as long as you gotthere on one of its trains. Of course, that was back in the good old days, whenthere was a fair chance you could actually get somewhere, and back again, in aday. Everyone had a fun day out, but there was also a subliminal message that youwould get a bit of company bonding into the bargain. A bit of fun and some indistinct effort to aid team spirit is what mostmanagement away days are about. They have no particular destination in mind oreven a route map. Sometimes they are intended to give busy managers time tothink and reflect on their roles. Time, especially thinking time, is an increasingly scarce commodity back atthe ranch. If that is their purpose then I suppose it sounds just the sort ofthing some management teams could do with. It’s just this idea of going “away” that bothers me. It isartificial. When everyone is away from the workface, it is easy to forget allthe barriers, obstacles and frustrations that are part and parcel of our dailyworking lives in the office. Without these restraints it is relatively easy to achieve a temporary high,a feel good factor which will always make such events popular. This is why manyaway days are “facilitated” by “inspirational” or”motivational” speakers, because the element of fun and the high areseen as crucial elements. As any honest trainer knows though, getting good happy-sheet scores isrelatively easy – just make sure they have a good lunch and a few laughs. Unfortunately, the reason that no-one takes such scores seriously is becausethey know that the likely effects are about as substantial and durable as astick of candyfloss. On a personal level, it might well be more interesting to travel hopefullythan to arrive, but organisations should at least know what their destinationis. Otherwise they might as well all sign up for that other great day out – themystery tour. By Paul Kearns, Senior partner, Personnel Works Previous Article Next Article Staff away days are too artificial to be of valueOn 11 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Scoreboard roundup — 12/26/18

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Wednesday’s sports events:NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONDetroit 106, Washington 95OT Phoenix 122, Orlando 120Toronto 106, Miami 104Indiana 129, Atlanta 1212OT Brooklyn 134, Charlotte 132Minnesota 119, Chicago 94Memphis 95, Cleveland 87Dallas 122, New Orleans 119San Antonio 111, Denver 103L.A. Clippers 127, Sacramento 118Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. December 27, 2018 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 12/26/18 Written bycenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

Royal Navy’s New Type 45 Destroyer Visits London, UK

first_img View post tag: Navy September 13, 2011 View post tag: Navy’s View post tag: Destroyer View post tag: Naval View post tag: 45 View post tag: Type View post tag: News by topic View post tag: UK View post tag: Newcenter_img View post tag: Royal Training & Education View post tag: London HMS Dauntless became the first of the Royal Navy’s new Type 45 destroyers to visit the capital when she sailed up the Thames on Saturday to the ExCeL Centre in London’s Docklands.The destroyer will be moored outside the exhibition centre where the Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEi) exhibition is being held this week.Dauntless will be present at ExCel until Saturday 17 September 2011, and will be on display to the 25,000 visitors from around the globe who travel to London to see over 1,300 defence contractors from over 50 countries.Ships berthed in the vicinity of the ExCeL Centre provide a rare opportunity for international industry at all levels to demonstrate their equipment to potential clients.HMS Dauntless is the second-in-class of the new Type 45 destroyers, and was commissioned in June 2010. She has recently returned from trials and exercises in America where she participated in an annual naval exercise, working alongside warships from France, Russia and the US.Her Commanding Officer, Captain Will Warrender, said:“It is an enormous honour and privilege to be the first Type 45 destroyer to visit London, and to support this prestigious defence and security event.“HMS Dauntless represents the future for the Royal Navy, and is bristling with the newest military technology. The ship represents the finest shipbuilding skills the UK has to offer and is a great example of the high standards and capabilities of the British defence manufacturing base.”Dauntless is the fifth Royal Navy ship to carry the name (not including the one in the first ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ film) and was designed primarily to defend multiple assets in an air threat environment. She is also capable of war-fighting in both traditional and littoral (close to the shore) environments.In order to achieve this, she is equipped with the most advanced propulsion system of any navy afloat and has a plethora of technologically-advanced weapons and sensors, including the Sea Viper missile system which encompasses multi-function radar to track and engage with multiple air targets simultaneously – without doubt the most modern and advanced system of its kind in the world.In September 2010, HMS Dauntless became the first Royal Navy warship to fire a Sea Viper missile and was awarded the Grytviken Trophy for anti-air warfare excellence later that year.[mappress]Source: royalnavy, September 13, 2011; Back to overview,Home naval-today Royal Navy’s New Type 45 Destroyer Visits London, UK View post tag: visits Royal Navy’s New Type 45 Destroyer Visits London, UK Share this articlelast_img read more

Summers’ a party for LMH

first_imgLMH JCR played host to an Anne Summers party last Friday evening, which saw girls perusing the latest lingerie and trying out sexual positions as well as being introduced to a diversity of sex toys such as the famous Rampant Rabbit vibrator, edible body paints and massage lotions. LMH lived up to its risque reputation as thirty students, all undergraduates, attended the girls-only event which was organized by Katie Beck, the female welfare officer, and held in the JCR. An attendee who wished to remain nameless told Cherwell that it had been “fun – a good chance to let your hair down”. Although participants had been allowed to try out some of the merchandise, they reported that the sizes were on the whole, “too big.” A raffle also took place in which ticket holders had the chance to win a prize ranging from chocolate body parts to the briefest negligees. Unfortunately, no photos were taken, leaving the male population of the college only guessing at what went on. A source said, “It wasn’t in the spirit of the event to take photographs; that was the whole point.” The party was designed to be a fun, “girly night in,” and is billed on the Anne Summers website as being, “the perfect opportunity to spend the night with your girlfriends, catch up on the latest gossip and shop till you drop…quite literally on the sofa…while having loads of fun all from the comfort of your own home!” The event was a huge success with many ladies making purchases. The organisers are now planning for a repeat of the event party. The LMH bash follows other colleges who are already purported to have hosted similar parties.ARCHIVE: 3rd week TT 2004last_img read more

LETTER TO EDITOR: Mayor Muddies The Water On City Finances

first_imgName Held By RequestEvansvillePlease take time and vote in today’s “Readers Poll”. Don’t miss reading today’s Feature articles because they are always an interesting read. Please scroll at the bottom of our paper so you can enjoy our creative political cartoons. Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without our permission.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare In a move that demonstrated the sheer PR genius of the Winnecke administration, the Mayor’s treatise of excuses for the city’s financial trauma appeared on-line and in the “Dead Tree” edition of the daily publication over the weekend.His theme was penned because he is pleading to move $8 million around between the Rainy Day Fund, Riverboat Revenue Fund and General Fund. City council is scheduled to review his request Monday night.  Apparently, he still doesn’t get the meaning of “Rainy Day Fund” or he thinks it has been raining a lot during his time on the third floor of the Civic Center.He wanted to explain this little monetary difficulty to us, use his magic decoder ring, lest we lowly taxpayers get the impression that he just can’t figure out that “budget” means you are given a figure and you spend no more. He also didn’t want his financial maneuver to get tangled up in politics, he wrote. That train left the station a long time ago with Winnecke sitting in the engineer’s seat.With all the military precision of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he reviewed his litany of excuses for his government’s failure to keep the city on sound financial footing. The bugaboos, according to the Mayor, are: Less tax revenue, an inconvenient revenue distribution schedule, rising health care costs, and finally, property tax caps.Now, if he keeps harping about property tax caps long enough, he’s going to talk himself into quite a pickle. These state-required limits keep public officials/politicians from digging too deep into our pockets to fund government. This is a curious mantra for Winnecke, since it’s the final firewall between Evansville property owners and his grab for money.  Aren’t Republicans generally fiscally conservative?He concluded his theme paper with the familiar indictment of the Democrat-controlled City Council for an ordinance they passed earlier this year that stopped him from finessing the fund balances by smoothly maneuvering money back and forth, and around and around. It was hard to determine if the administration wasn’t counting the same dollar more than once, so seamless were the money movements.What he failed to mention was that prior to passing the ordinance,  the City Council made repeated requests for a “spending plan,” as they predicted the city’s financial ship could run aground. The  past Mayor of Evansville and City Controller said a plan would be forthcoming.  But another operative sneered, “We’re making a plan. It’s called a budget.”So, with no “plan,” the ordinance halting the fund interchange was passed, and the moaning began.The City Council, not without their failings, has become the Mayor’s favorite foil. In order to be the “good guy” he has to identify the “bad guys.”  They have often failed to fully examine issues in a timely and concerted manner.  Often, they are all over the place – challenging, arguing and finally acquiescing.  Leadership sometime seems to be simply a goal.But, the negative fiscal prognostications came from council, though sometimes hard to decipher.  The Mayor and his squad had a simple retort – “No it’s not.”  However, beginning year General Fund balances were reported to have dropped from $4 million in 2013 to $307,000 in 2015.You almost have to overlook some of Winnecke’s emotionally charged positioning.  After all, he came into office believing that Democrats loved him.  He somehow thought that election love, borne out of a local political divide of epic proportions, would continue as a warm afterglow into his reign.  The concept that “my enemy’s enemy is my friend” escaped him somehow, so he didn’t see that election love is a convenient, fleeting love.Thus he started down the path to a dicey relationship with Democrats on City Council.  He didn’t understand that he needed their approval for critical issues and other lesser whims. Cart then horse, was his frequent game plan.When he stood before that “Welcome to Evansville Earthcare Energy” banner on March 2, 2012, he didn’t make much of the fact that the City Council still had to OK the deal. With some hesitation that finally got legs, the council did get its turn to welcome Earthcare Energy to Evansville, but they chose to jerk back the welcome mat, thankfully so.  During this drama, the Mayor unveiled a strategy of casting council as obstinate, naysaying obstructionists.  Ah, where did the love go?Winnecke spent the rest of his first year in office waging a campaign to become the first monarch of a consolidated county-wide government.  That didn’t turn out so well either. They love me, they love me not.And finally, to explain his leadership posture and motivation, we have to remember he came from county government, a virtual Republican love fest for years.  Not an environment requiring a high level of compromise.  So power-sharing might have been a somewhat foreign concept for him, a love-struck new Mayor faced with figuring out how to work with checks-and-balances and having an apparent need to perfect his financial expertise.last_img read more

GreenPalm continues to promote its certificates

first_imgSustainability in the palm oil industry is largely being driven by GreenPalm certificates – instead of physical sustainable palm oil, according to new figures from the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO).Its figures show that while certified sustainable palm oil production has surpassed 5 million tonnes, 2.65 million tonnes have been sold, and 70% of them traded via GreenPalm certificates, which businesses buy to off-set their purchases of palm oil from a range of sources.GreenPalm general manager Bob Norman said: “It may surprise many people to learn that most of sustainable palm oil being bought by businesses is through the book-and-claim route. But when we take into account the sheer complexities of obtaining a segregated sustainable supply of palm-based products, it’s easy to understand why many businesses are choosing this approach.”Norman said GreenPalm was an important tool in the drive to change the palm oil industry at source, instead of rewarding only those certified mills with a supply link to large corporations.GreenPalm was set up by oil company AAK and the RSPO in 2006. AAK UK recently announced that its full range of bakery fats and many other standard product lines will now contain RSPO-certified sustainable palm oil.>>GreenPalm trades millionth certificate>>Suppliers step up to meet palm oil challengelast_img read more

School board approves remote learning plan, budget timeline

first_imgFARMINGTON – Regional School Unit 9 directors named an interim assistant principal and approved a budget timeline and an elementary school remote learning plan at Tuesday’s meeting.The remote learning plan described by Curriculum Coordinator Laura Columbia was for use in the elementary schools if they needed to go from the current, hybrid model to fully remote for a period of time. So far, Columbia said, the district had been fortunate and has only had to close the elementary schools individually, no more than a couple days at a time.The plan calls for a 9:30 a.m. to 3:12 p.m. school day with a minimum of one hour of direct instruction, potentially broken into smaller intervals. There would also be 3.5 hours of student support and engagement activities, which could include mini lessons, group and one-on-one support sessions and practice time, as well as an hour of independent student time. Instruction periods would focus on the reading, writing, math, science and social studies standards, Columbia said, noting that student standards would be prioritized given the more limited school time this year.The remote plan would maintain the Blue/Gold schedule. Classes such as art, music and physical education would use a mix of recorded videos, live instruction and office hours, depending on the grade level.Columbia said that the plan had been developed through discussions with teachers. Both Columbia and building administrators noted that they were continuing to reach out to students and families that needed help.The board also approved a timeline for the 2021-22 budget process. Utilizing a budget committee to review programs during all-day meetings in March, the timeline envisions a mid-April community forum and the process concluding with a referendum on June 8.The district’s longtime business manager, Kris Pottle, has announced her retirement as of this June, marking her last budget process with the district.Director J. Wayne Kinney of Farmington said that while the district couldn’t possibly replace Pottle, they would have to learn to live without her. “She certainly deserves our congratulations,” Kinney said.The board also approved naming Galen Dalrymple, a special education teacher, interim assistant principal at Mt. Blue High School. Dalrymple, who has a number of years with the district and has assisted in administrative functions before, will fill in for Joel Smith, who is serving as interim principal of MBHS with Monique Poulin working as interim Superintendent.last_img read more

The Disco Biscuits Close Camp Bisco With Three Sets [Pro-Shot Video]

first_imgThe Disco Biscuits closed their annual Camp Bisco on Saturday night with a whopping three sets. After the previous two nights of festival heaven, the electronic jam band pioneers led their faithful followers through the most anticipated part of the weekend with several hours of improvised jamming within the compounds of their favorited compositions.Camp Bisco Program Guide Reveals New Disco Biscuits DatesThe first set opened with “Caves of the East” into “Loose Change.” From there, “Bernstein & Chasnoff” sandwiched an inverted version of “Highwire” and “Tempest” within a monstrous extended jam. The band closed the first set with “Mulberry’s Dream.”In true Disco Biscuits fashion, the second set opened and closed with “Morph Dusseldorf,” with a non-stop run of songs including an inverted version of “Above the Waves,” “The Champions,” and “Exodus” featuring first and only special guest, guitarist Tom Hamilton–who celebrated his 15th year in a row as a musician at Camp Bisco. “Above the Waves” reappeared before the enormous second set closed with “Morph Dusseldorf.”The Disco Biscuits Launch Free Emoji App, And It’s IncredibleThe band again appeared for a third set, beginning with “Dub Dribble” and “Helicopters,” a favorited song that again emerged to close the show. Donna Summer‘s “I Feel Love” was debuted, then followed by “Tricycle” and “Air Song.”The Disco Biscuits offered a free stream of their performances throughout the weekend, so you can enjoy all three sets below: Setlist: The Disco Biscuits | Camp Bisco | Montage Mountain, PA | 7/15/17I: Caves of the East-> Loose Change, Bernstein & Chasnoff-> Highwire (inverted)-> Tempest-> Bernstein & Chasnoff, Mulberry’s DreamII: Morph Dusseldorf-> Above the Waves (inverted)-> The Champions-> Exodus (w/ Tom Hamilton)-> Above the Waves-> Morph DusseldorfIII: Dub Dribble-> Helicopters-> I Feel Love (Donna Summer, 1st time played)-> Tricycle-> Air Song-> Helicopters[photo by Dave Vann]last_img read more

Pres. Faust calls global health one of her main priorities for Harvard;

first_imgDeclaring the University’s efforts toimprove the state of global health knowledge, education, and capacity building to be one of her “very highestpriorities” as president of Harvard, Drew Faust today announced theappointment of Sue J. Goldie, Roger Irving Lee Professor of Public Health and director of the Center for Health DecisionScience at the Harvard School of Public Health, as the director of theHarvard Institute for Global Health (HIGH).Faust also announced that the workof HIGH is so integral to the long-term focus and goals of Harvard that theorganization that began its existence as an experimental faculty “initiative”has been granted permanent institute status.“I believe that this is truly a moment of specialpossibility for global health, both in the world and here at Harvard,” saidFaust. “If we needed to be reminded of this, we have been this past year, firstwith the global H1N1 pandemic, and then when the earthquake struck Haiti and wesaw the world come together.“We need to engage and equip our students, who aretelling us in ever increasing numbers that they want to engage in the globalhealth effort,” Faust continued. “We need to support the very best researchersand the work of our outstanding faculty, in fields stretching across thespectrum of inquiry from immunology to epidemiology, health policy, history,molecular biology, and philosophy. I have every confidence that Sue Goldie, whohas already demonstrated her outstanding scholarship, leadership, andcollaborative skills, is the person to lead this special effort.”The appointment ofGoldie, a MacArthur Foundation “genius award” recipient, marks the end of ayearlong, international search for a new director for HIGH. Goldie has beeninvolved with HIGH since 2007, and as co-director of the executive committeeworked to bring faculty from all parts of the University together, consistentlyadvocating on behalf of junior faculty interested in global health.Because HIGH isabove all a collaborative organization dedicated to educating and training thenext generation of global healthleaders, Faust also appointed two faculty leaders to direct thecritically important educational and training efforts.Paul Farmer, the Maude and LillianPresley Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard MedicalSchool (HMS), will oversee global health medical education and physiciantraining. Farmer, who is also a MacArthur Fellowship winner, is chair of the Department ofGlobal Health and Social Medicine at HMS, a professor in the Department ofGlobal Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health,Chief of the Division ofGlobal Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital,and isperhaps best known internationally as the co-founder of Partners In Health,the global nonprofit health care delivery organization.David Cutler, the Otto EcksteinProfessor of Applied Economics in Harvard’s Department of Economics and amember of the faculty of the Harvard Kennedy School, will direct undergraduateand graduate programs in global health. Cutler, who worked on health carereform in the Clinton administration and served as a health care adviser to theObama campaign, is a member of HIGH’s faculty executive committee, served asHIGH’s interim director for the past year, and led the effort to create a secondaryconcentration in global health at Harvard College.Goldie said, “Strong leadership inglobal health already resides in the faculty of the Medical School, School ofPublic Health, and academic hospitals. As the faculty director for the HarvardInstitute for Global Health, I see myself principally as a coordinator,facilitator, and collaborator. With a leadership team comprised of myself, PaulFarmer, and David Cutler, I am confident we can create a University-wide community that is bound by a sense of sharedmission.”“Global health is an intellectual and practicaltopic of tremendous interest to our undergraduate and graduate students,”said Michael D. Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and JohnH. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Professors Goldie,Farmer, and Cutler are exactly the kind of seasoned leaders we need for such animportant, University-wide institute. I am also thrilled that each bringsto the institute a deep commitment to Harvard’s extensive educational offeringsin global health.”Harvard Provost Steven E. Hymansaid that granting institute status to HIGH and appointing Goldie “mark a verysignificant step along what has been a 15-year journey toward a trulycollaborative and more interdisciplinary Harvard. Global health is an area inwhich we already have world-class researchers, clinicians, teachers, andstudents,” Hyman said. “By bringing them all together as parts of a coordinatedwhole, without boundaries or silos, we expect to have far more impact than wewould expect from the already considerable sum of the many parts of our globalhealth effort.”“It is my convictionthat for Harvard to remain a leader in the burgeoningfield of global health, we must invest heavily in linking service to trainingand research,” Farmer said. “Since global health is not a discipline, butrather a collection of problems, we need to draw on the strengths of themedical school, the school of public health and the teaching hospitals—andespecially on the work of our partner sites—to help tackle the biggestchallenge of our time: understanding and improving delivery of services in thiscountry and in others. Global health is a new paradigm and very different fromits predecessor paradigm, international health. Boston is on the globe,too,” Farmer noted.Cutler said he sees HIGHcoordinating the teaching and training of students at all levels. “Forundergraduates, this means having courses for those who want to learn a little,up to those who want to make global health their life’s focus,” he said. “Italso means providing students with the ability to interact with the world andpractice what they learn. For graduate students, this involves direct trainingin global health issues, access to people and research sites, and integrationof the skills of many different disciplines. It will take a collaboration offaculty all across Harvard to make this happen. I know the faculty are eager toparticipate, and I look forward to helping organize them.”The global health leadershipappointments were praised by both Julio Frenk, dean of the Harvard School ofPublic Health, and Jeffrey Flier, dean of Harvard Medical School.“SueGoldie, Paul Farmer, and David Cutler are uniquely qualified to lead HIGH to anew stage of development,” Frenk said.  “The key to achieving successfullythe Institute’s mission will continue to be the ability to build bridges acrossthe amazing intellectual capital of the entire university. Professors Goldie,Farmer, and Cutler have exceptional skills in team building and mentoring.They are also deeply committed to the educational mission of HIGH, asdemonstrated by their crucial role in expanding the course offerings in globalhealth and by their own dedication to teaching.”Flier said, “This is a signalmoment in our effort to bring together under a single banner the disparateparts of a world-class program in global health. I have no doubt that SueGoldie, Paul Farmer, and David Cutler have the vision, collaborative instincts,and determination to bring people together in this common cause, and thattogether they will create a truly collaborative, interdisciplinary program thatwill benefit not only all the world’s peoples, but also will benefit Harvard asa university.”Trained as a physician, decision scientist, and public healthresearcher, Goldie has broad interests that include using evidence-based policyto narrow the gap between rich and poor, leveraging science and technology astools for global diplomacy, strengthening capacity through sustainablenon-exploitative partnerships, and fostering innovation in education locally andglobally. Drawn to health problems in the mostvulnerable populations, she conducts rigorous analysis using themethods and tools of decision science, which uses mathematics to solve resourceproblems, to inform complex and difficult policy decisions. Her analytic work relates to awide range of topics — from vaccine-preventable diseases to maternal mortality— in many settings, from disparities in the United States to broad failures ofpublic health delivery in the poorest countries.An accomplishedscientist, Goldie has published 150 original research papers and hasbeen principal investigator on awards from the National Institutes of Health, theCenters for Disease Control, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the DorisDuke Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation, which in 2005awarded her its grant “for genius and creativity” in applying the tools ofdecision science to combat major public health problems.She has received numerous teachingand mentorship awards, including the Harvard School of Public Health mentoringaward and the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from HarvardUniversity. She serves on the StandingCommittee on Health Policy, teaches one of the largest classes at theSchool of Public Health in decision science, and this year also taught a newundergraduate class as part of the Gen Ed curriculum.A member of the Institute ofMedicine, Goldie is a graduate ofUnion College and Albany Medical College. She completed her internship andresidency in internal medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale UniversitySchool of Medicine, and earned her M.P.H. from the Harvard School of PublicHealth in 1997. She joined the faculty of the School of Public Health in 1998.last_img read more

Looking for his big break

first_imgDerek Mueller sang and acted his way through four years at Harvard, and now, with Commencement looming, he’s taking his show on the road.Mueller, a senior psychology concentrator and Mather House resident, spent the past three years as a member of the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, the nation’s oldest collegiate theatrical troupe, known for its annual burlesque show and for its traditional roasts of a Man and Woman of the Year, selected from the ranks of the world’s top entertainers.For the past year, Mueller served as Hasty Pudding’s cast vice president, helping guide the creative process that led to this year’s production, “Commie Dearest,” a heartfelt tale (not really) about a young girl (a man) in the 1950s suburbs, joining forces with communists to fight misogyny and win the American Dream. Mueller played “Olive Lucy,” the owner of the local bowling alley (what could be more American?) where the townspeople congregated.With work on next year’s production beginning in the spring, Mueller said Hasty Pudding dominated his time at Harvard, though he also spent his freshman year with the Krokodiloes, Harvard’s oldest a cappella singing group. Mueller said the Krokodiloes’ extensive summer tour allowed him to see countries on six continents.The Hasty Pudding Theatricals experience is so consuming that each spring when the year’s performance — which includes a spring break tour to New York and Bermuda — is over, Mueller said he finds himself at loose ends.“After the show ends and I get back from Bermuda, I don’t know what to do with my time. I wander about like a lost puppy,” Mueller said.Of course this year, with graduation looming, Mueller has a bit more to contemplate. When asked his plans, Mueller said without hesitation, “I want to be a pop singer.” He plans to embrace the vagaries of fame, fortune, and the entertainment industry and head west after graduation to Los Angeles, where he’ll work the phones and Internet and see what happens.After describing his plan, Mueller, who hails from Cincinnati, hastens to say that he’s not normally as impulsive as the plan sounds, but that it’s time for him to make this kind of a move and it’s one he’s excited about.Mueller has been interested in music since he was young. On arriving at Harvard, he decided not to pursue a music degree because it is focused on theory and he is more interested in performance. Psychology allows him to understand people better, which helps in acting. In addition to his time with the Krokodiloes and Hasty Pudding Theatricals, Mueller composed, sang, and played piano on his own. He acknowledges that the Hasty Pudding’s style is different from his own music, but he relishes the Pudding experience nonetheless.When asked what advice he’d give incoming freshmen, Mueller advises them not to listen to any.“Make your own mistakes,” Mueller said. “Trying to apply what others learned from their mistakes will short-circuit your own experience.”last_img read more