Vulfpeck Releases “It Gets Funkier IV” Featuring KNOWER’s Louis Cole [Video]

first_imgLast month, Vulfpeck announced their eighth studio release, Hill Climber, the follow-up to 2017’s Mr. Finish Line, due out December 7, 2018 (pre-order digital download here). Vulfpeck has consistently released a collection of studio recordings every year since their official inception in 2011. Along with the album’s announcement, Vulfpect released a pair of singles, “Lost My Treble Long Ago” and “Soft Parade”. Today, the band has released their fourth version of “It Gets Funkier”. Featuring KNOWER’s Louis Cole on drums, “It Gets Funkier IV” brings the composition to a new level of musicianship. Check out the video below:Vulfpeck feat. Louis Cole – “It Gets Funkier IV”[Video: Vulf]The band offered a pre-order of a limited-edition white vinyl pressing of Hill Climber for 20 pounds (U.K.) each here, although the pressing is now sold out. On the project’s website, the tracklisting is laid out with ten total tracks, featuring special guest collaborations with vocalists Monica Martin and Mike Viola as well as featured vocals from Theo Katzman and Antwaun Stanley.See below for a full tracklisting for Vulfpeck’s upcoming album, Hill Climber.Vulfpeck – Hill Climber TracklistingA SIDEHalf of the Way (feat. Theo Katzman)Darwin Derby (feat. Theo Katzman & Antwaun Stanley)Lonely Town (feat. Theo Katzman)Love is a Beautiful Thing (feat. Theo Katzman & Monica Martin)For Survival (feat. Mike Viola)B SIDESoft ParadeLost My Treble Long AgoDisco Ulysses (Instrumental)The Cup StackerIt Gets Funkier IV (feat. Louis Cole)View ‘Hill Climber’ Tracklistinglast_img read more

Bourbon & Beyond Announces 2019 Lineup: Robert Plant, Foo Fighters, Trey Anastasio Band, More

first_imgOn Tuesday morning, Bourbon & Beyond announced the impressive lineup for their 2019 event, set to take place at the Highland Festival Grounds at KY Expo Center in Louisville, KY from September 20th–22nd. The 2019 edition of Bourbon & Beyond has also expanded from two days to three days—perhaps as a consolation for the festival’s rained-out second day in 2018.On Friday, September 20th, the whiskey, food, and music festival will feature performances by Foo Fighters, John Fogerty, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, The Flaming Lips, +LIVE+, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Greensky Bluegrass, Blackberry Smoke, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, and more.On Saturday, September 21st, Robert Plant and the Sensational Space Shifters will top the day’s lineup alongside performances by Trey Anastasio Band, Daryl Hall & John Oates, Alison Krauss, Grace Potter, Squeeze, Jenny Lewis, Del McCoury Band, Samantha Fish, The White Buffalo, Maggie Rose, Patrick Droney, The Travelin’ McCourys, and more.The event’s final day, Sunday, September 22nd, will feature performances by Zac Brown Band, a 50th-anniversary performance by ZZ Top, Leon Bridges, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Kurt Vile and the Violators, Margo Price, Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul, Edie Brickell & New Bohemians, White Reaper, Whiskey Myers, Southern Avenue, Caroline Jones, Dustbowl Revival, The Lil Smokies, and Front Country.Tickets to Bourbon & Beyond 2019 go on sale this Friday, March 15th, at 12 p.m. local time. For more information on ticketing and the various food and drink options that will be available at the festival, head here.last_img read more

Tedeschi Trucks Band Announce One-Night-Only 2020 Show At London’s Wembley Arena

first_imgAmid their ongoing, extensive European tour, Tedeschi Trucks Band has announced that they’ll return to that part of the world in 2020 for one show only.On February 1st, 2020, Tedeschi Trucks Band will play one of their biggest shows to date with their debut performance at the 12,500-capacity The SSE Arena, Wembley in London, U.K. According to the band’s announcement, “This will be TTB’s only show in the UK or Europe in 2020 and it’s sure to be a very special show for band and fans alike.”Swamp Family Fan Club pre-sale opens on Wednesday, April 10th at 10 AM. If you aren’t a member already, you can join here. Fan pre-sale opens on Wednesday, April 10th at 12 PM with the code “TRUCKS”, with a public on-sale opening on Friday, April 12th at 10 AM. All on-sale times are in London local time.For more information on their ongoing 2019 Europe tour, as well as the band’s summer plans in the U.S., head to Tedeschi Trucks Band’s website.last_img read more

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones Expand 2019 Summer Tour

first_imgVeteran ska-punk outfit The Mighty Mighty Bosstones have added more dates to their upcoming summer run. Having already announced some select dates in support of Rancid and The Bouncing Souls, Mighty Mighty Bosstones will now visit eight more cities throughout the month of August.Related: Blink-182 Performs ‘Enema Of The State’ In Full During Back To The Beach FestivalThe new leg of dates begin on August 16th in Milwaukee and continues over the next week before wrapping on August 24th in Tinley Park, IL with their appearance at 350 Fest. Venues included on the brief run of shows include Royal Oak Music Hall in Royal Oak, MI (8/17); Webster Hall in New York, NY (8/21); and Anthology in Rochester, NY (8/22) to name a few. MMB will be joined on select dates in support by Bedouin Soundclash.Prior to their August run, the band will head overseas for a U.K./European tour beginning on June 27th. Fans can catch the band in Phoenix, AZ this Saturday, where they’ll be performing in Margaret T. Hance Park as part of The Bash Festival.Tickets go on sale here starting this Friday, May 10th, at 10 a.m. Local.New Summer Tour Dates8/16 – Milwaukee, WI – The Rave*8/18 – Elora, ON – Riverfest Elora8/17 – Royal Oak, MI – Royal Oak Music Hall*8/20 – Hampton Beach, NH – Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom*8/21 – New York, NY – Webster Hall*8/22 – Rochester, NY – Anthology*8/23 – Millvale, PA – Mr. Smalls Theatre*8/24 – Tinley Park, IL – 350 Fest* w/ Bedouin SoundclashView All New Tour Dateslast_img read more

Turkuaz Shares “The Question” Video From Recent “Unplugged” Sugarshack Sessions [Watch]

first_imgBrooklyn-based nine-piece funk powerhouse Turkuaz has released an acoustic video for “The Question”, off of the band’s 2018 Life In The City release. Recorded during a recent Sugarshack Session in Miami, FL, the video is the third to be released from the “unplugged” session, following the release of Turkuaz’s bluegrass-inspired “Life In The City” and “European Festivity Nightmare” videos.Guitarist Dave Brandwein explained with the arrival of the first video in the series, “We were hesitant to do this at first when we were told it was an ‘unplugged’ session. Our live show is very loud, in-your-face, and most of all, ELECTRIC! – in every sense of the word. But it ended up being an inspiring challenge and opportunity for us to do something totally new.”Watch Turkuaz’s new acoustic take on “The Question” below:Turkuaz – “The Question” [Live Acoustic][Video: Sugarshack Sessions]Turkuaz recently announced a brief international jaunt this fall, marking the ensemble’s debut performances in Japan and Australia.See below for a full list of the band’s upcoming tour dates. For ticketing and more information, head to Turkuaz’s website.Turkuaz 2019 Tour Dates:MAY 23 THURooster Walk FestivalMartinsville, VA, United StatesMAY 26 SUNBottleRockNapa, CA, United StatesJUN 1 SATBranch FestNewport, ME, United StatesJUN 22 SATRed Rocks AmphitheatreMorrison, CO, United StatesJUN 26 WEDThe State RoomSalt Lake City, UT, United StatesJUN 28 FRIRialto TheatreBozeman, MT, United StatesJUN 29 SATTop Hat LoungeMissoula, MT, United StatesJUL 4 THUThe HiveSandpoint, ID, United StatesJUL 5 FRIThe Remington BarWhitefish, MT, United StatesJUL 6 SATThe Remington BarWhitefish, MT, United StatesJUL 13 SAT4848 FestivalSnowshoe, WV, United StatesJUL 27 SATTumble DownBurlington, Vermont, United StatesAUG 1 THUThe Werk Out Music & Arts FestivalThornville, OH, United StatesAUG 10 SATTelluride Jazz FestivalTelluride, CO, United StatesAUG 17 SATHot August Music FestivalCockeysville, MD, United StatesAUG 24 SATDruid City Music FestivalTuscaloosa, AL, United StatesSEP 1 SUNJazz Aspen SnowmassAspen, CO, United StatesSEP 21 SATMountain Sol FestFelton, CA, United StatesSEP 29 SUNBlue Note TokyoMinato City, Tōkyō-to, JapanSEP 30 MONBlue Note TokyoMinato City, Tōkyō-to, JapanOCT 4 FRICaloundra Music FestivalKings Beach, AustraliaOCT 5 SATCaloundra Music FestivalKings Beach, AustraliaOCT 6 SUNCaloundra Music FestivalKings Beach, AustraliaJAN 7 TUEJam CruiseMiami, FL, United StatesView Tour Dateslast_img read more

Looking for life beyond Earth

first_imgCould life exist beyond our own blue planet? According to scientist Carolyn Porco, it’s certainly possible.Porco is the director of flight operations and imaging team leader for the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. Her work involves taking detailed pictures in space, shots that offer insights into the nature of the universe, and signs of life elsewhere in the solar system.“Gorgeous” was how she described the Cassini images to a crowd at the Radcliffe Gymnasium in a talk on April 1. Her listeners agreed.There was a collective gasp from the student-filled audience as she showed a photo of Saturn taken during an eclipse of the sun. The negative-looking image revealed a sharp outline of the planet and its surrounding rings.Porco spoke as part of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Dean’s Lecture Series. The lectures are part of the institute’s Academic Engagement Programs (AEP), which sponsor projects with Harvard faculty, Radcliffe Institute fellows, and Harvard students in scholarly and research endeavors.The Cassini mission, which began in 1997, has been studying Saturn and its diverse system of moons, sending back stunning images and even evidence that life could exist 932 million miles from Earth.Some of the mission’s highlights involve analysis of Saturn’s rings, their makeup, the gaps between them, and little “moonlettes.” The study of such moonlettes and the gaps they influence provides a “giant touchstone” for understanding how planets are formed, noted the scientist, who also discussed two of the planet’s moons in detail, Titan and its much smaller counterpart, Enceladus.With Titan having an atmosphere vaguely similar to the Earth’s, including the presence of molecular nitrogen, as well as a troposphere and stratosphere, researchers were eager to get a closer look at the large moon in orbit around Saturn. They did, with the help of Huygens, a European-designed probe that landed on Titan’s surface in 2005. The event was worthy of a ticker tape parade, said an emotional Porco, who recalled seeing grown men brought to tears when the probe landed.“This was like a Jules Verne adventure come true,” said Porco. “It was the day humanity landed a device of our making in the outer solar system.”The images sent back from the probe were “outrageously easy to interpret,” said Porco, and included shots of a branching “dendritic drainage pattern” on the moon’s surface, one that only could have been formed by the flow of liquids. There also were photos of mountainous regions and a series of dunes.The data revealed that Titan “was alien and exotic and yet strangely Earth-like” in its geological and geographical complexity.On the small, icy moon Enceladus, “the mother lode of all discoveries was discovered at the South Pole,” said Porco. She described Cassini’s findings of elevated temperatures in the moon’s polar region, as well as an enormous plume of icy particles shooting tens of thousands of kilometers into space.Analysis of the icy trail, which includes water vapor and trace amounts of organic materials such as methane, carbon dioxide, and propane, suggests it is fueled by geysers erupting from a pocket of salt water within the moon.The findings, noted Porco, point to the possibility of  “an environment where life itself might be stirring.”“Should we ever discover that a second genesis had occurred in our solar system, independently outside the Earth,” she added, “then I think at that point the spell is broken. The existence theorem has been proven, and we could safely infer from it that life was not a bug but a feature of the universe in which we live, that it’s commonplace and has occurred a staggering number of times.”last_img read more

Pres. Faust calls global health one of her main priorities for Harvard;

first_imgDeclaring the University’s efforts toimprove the state of global health knowledge, education, and capacity building to be one of her “very highestpriorities” as president of Harvard, Drew Faust today announced theappointment of Sue J. Goldie, Roger Irving Lee Professor of Public Health and director of the Center for Health DecisionScience at the Harvard School of Public Health, as the director of theHarvard Institute for Global Health (HIGH).Faust also announced that the workof HIGH is so integral to the long-term focus and goals of Harvard that theorganization that began its existence as an experimental faculty “initiative”has been granted permanent institute status.“I believe that this is truly a moment of specialpossibility for global health, both in the world and here at Harvard,” saidFaust. “If we needed to be reminded of this, we have been this past year, firstwith the global H1N1 pandemic, and then when the earthquake struck Haiti and wesaw the world come together.“We need to engage and equip our students, who aretelling us in ever increasing numbers that they want to engage in the globalhealth effort,” Faust continued. “We need to support the very best researchersand the work of our outstanding faculty, in fields stretching across thespectrum of inquiry from immunology to epidemiology, health policy, history,molecular biology, and philosophy. I have every confidence that Sue Goldie, whohas already demonstrated her outstanding scholarship, leadership, andcollaborative skills, is the person to lead this special effort.”The appointment ofGoldie, a MacArthur Foundation “genius award” recipient, marks the end of ayearlong, international search for a new director for HIGH. Goldie has beeninvolved with HIGH since 2007, and as co-director of the executive committeeworked to bring faculty from all parts of the University together, consistentlyadvocating on behalf of junior faculty interested in global health.Because HIGH isabove all a collaborative organization dedicated to educating and training thenext generation of global healthleaders, Faust also appointed two faculty leaders to direct thecritically important educational and training efforts.Paul Farmer, the Maude and LillianPresley Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard MedicalSchool (HMS), will oversee global health medical education and physiciantraining. Farmer, who is also a MacArthur Fellowship winner, is chair of the Department ofGlobal Health and Social Medicine at HMS, a professor in the Department ofGlobal Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health,Chief of the Division ofGlobal Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital,and isperhaps best known internationally as the co-founder of Partners In Health,the global nonprofit health care delivery organization.David Cutler, the Otto EcksteinProfessor of Applied Economics in Harvard’s Department of Economics and amember of the faculty of the Harvard Kennedy School, will direct undergraduateand graduate programs in global health. Cutler, who worked on health carereform in the Clinton administration and served as a health care adviser to theObama campaign, is a member of HIGH’s faculty executive committee, served asHIGH’s interim director for the past year, and led the effort to create a secondaryconcentration in global health at Harvard College.Goldie said, “Strong leadership inglobal health already resides in the faculty of the Medical School, School ofPublic Health, and academic hospitals. As the faculty director for the HarvardInstitute for Global Health, I see myself principally as a coordinator,facilitator, and collaborator. With a leadership team comprised of myself, PaulFarmer, and David Cutler, I am confident we can create a University-wide community that is bound by a sense of sharedmission.”“Global health is an intellectual and practicaltopic of tremendous interest to our undergraduate and graduate students,”said Michael D. Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and JohnH. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Professors Goldie,Farmer, and Cutler are exactly the kind of seasoned leaders we need for such animportant, University-wide institute. I am also thrilled that each bringsto the institute a deep commitment to Harvard’s extensive educational offeringsin global health.”Harvard Provost Steven E. Hymansaid that granting institute status to HIGH and appointing Goldie “mark a verysignificant step along what has been a 15-year journey toward a trulycollaborative and more interdisciplinary Harvard. Global health is an area inwhich we already have world-class researchers, clinicians, teachers, andstudents,” Hyman said. “By bringing them all together as parts of a coordinatedwhole, without boundaries or silos, we expect to have far more impact than wewould expect from the already considerable sum of the many parts of our globalhealth effort.”“It is my convictionthat for Harvard to remain a leader in the burgeoningfield of global health, we must invest heavily in linking service to trainingand research,” Farmer said. “Since global health is not a discipline, butrather a collection of problems, we need to draw on the strengths of themedical school, the school of public health and the teaching hospitals—andespecially on the work of our partner sites—to help tackle the biggestchallenge of our time: understanding and improving delivery of services in thiscountry and in others. Global health is a new paradigm and very different fromits predecessor paradigm, international health. Boston is on the globe,too,” Farmer noted.Cutler said he sees HIGHcoordinating the teaching and training of students at all levels. “Forundergraduates, this means having courses for those who want to learn a little,up to those who want to make global health their life’s focus,” he said. “Italso means providing students with the ability to interact with the world andpractice what they learn. For graduate students, this involves direct trainingin global health issues, access to people and research sites, and integrationof the skills of many different disciplines. It will take a collaboration offaculty all across Harvard to make this happen. I know the faculty are eager toparticipate, and I look forward to helping organize them.”The global health leadershipappointments were praised by both Julio Frenk, dean of the Harvard School ofPublic Health, and Jeffrey Flier, dean of Harvard Medical School.“SueGoldie, Paul Farmer, and David Cutler are uniquely qualified to lead HIGH to anew stage of development,” Frenk said.  “The key to achieving successfullythe Institute’s mission will continue to be the ability to build bridges acrossthe amazing intellectual capital of the entire university. Professors Goldie,Farmer, and Cutler have exceptional skills in team building and mentoring.They are also deeply committed to the educational mission of HIGH, asdemonstrated by their crucial role in expanding the course offerings in globalhealth and by their own dedication to teaching.”Flier said, “This is a signalmoment in our effort to bring together under a single banner the disparateparts of a world-class program in global health. I have no doubt that SueGoldie, Paul Farmer, and David Cutler have the vision, collaborative instincts,and determination to bring people together in this common cause, and thattogether they will create a truly collaborative, interdisciplinary program thatwill benefit not only all the world’s peoples, but also will benefit Harvard asa university.”Trained as a physician, decision scientist, and public healthresearcher, Goldie has broad interests that include using evidence-based policyto narrow the gap between rich and poor, leveraging science and technology astools for global diplomacy, strengthening capacity through sustainablenon-exploitative partnerships, and fostering innovation in education locally andglobally. Drawn to health problems in the mostvulnerable populations, she conducts rigorous analysis using themethods and tools of decision science, which uses mathematics to solve resourceproblems, to inform complex and difficult policy decisions. Her analytic work relates to awide range of topics — from vaccine-preventable diseases to maternal mortality— in many settings, from disparities in the United States to broad failures ofpublic health delivery in the poorest countries.An accomplishedscientist, Goldie has published 150 original research papers and hasbeen principal investigator on awards from the National Institutes of Health, theCenters for Disease Control, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the DorisDuke Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation, which in 2005awarded her its grant “for genius and creativity” in applying the tools ofdecision science to combat major public health problems.She has received numerous teachingand mentorship awards, including the Harvard School of Public Health mentoringaward and the Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from HarvardUniversity. She serves on the StandingCommittee on Health Policy, teaches one of the largest classes at theSchool of Public Health in decision science, and this year also taught a newundergraduate class as part of the Gen Ed curriculum.A member of the Institute ofMedicine, Goldie is a graduate ofUnion College and Albany Medical College. She completed her internship andresidency in internal medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale UniversitySchool of Medicine, and earned her M.P.H. from the Harvard School of PublicHealth in 1997. She joined the faculty of the School of Public Health in 1998.last_img read more

Looking for his big break

first_imgDerek Mueller sang and acted his way through four years at Harvard, and now, with Commencement looming, he’s taking his show on the road.Mueller, a senior psychology concentrator and Mather House resident, spent the past three years as a member of the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, the nation’s oldest collegiate theatrical troupe, known for its annual burlesque show and for its traditional roasts of a Man and Woman of the Year, selected from the ranks of the world’s top entertainers.For the past year, Mueller served as Hasty Pudding’s cast vice president, helping guide the creative process that led to this year’s production, “Commie Dearest,” a heartfelt tale (not really) about a young girl (a man) in the 1950s suburbs, joining forces with communists to fight misogyny and win the American Dream. Mueller played “Olive Lucy,” the owner of the local bowling alley (what could be more American?) where the townspeople congregated.With work on next year’s production beginning in the spring, Mueller said Hasty Pudding dominated his time at Harvard, though he also spent his freshman year with the Krokodiloes, Harvard’s oldest a cappella singing group. Mueller said the Krokodiloes’ extensive summer tour allowed him to see countries on six continents.The Hasty Pudding Theatricals experience is so consuming that each spring when the year’s performance — which includes a spring break tour to New York and Bermuda — is over, Mueller said he finds himself at loose ends.“After the show ends and I get back from Bermuda, I don’t know what to do with my time. I wander about like a lost puppy,” Mueller said.Of course this year, with graduation looming, Mueller has a bit more to contemplate. When asked his plans, Mueller said without hesitation, “I want to be a pop singer.” He plans to embrace the vagaries of fame, fortune, and the entertainment industry and head west after graduation to Los Angeles, where he’ll work the phones and Internet and see what happens.After describing his plan, Mueller, who hails from Cincinnati, hastens to say that he’s not normally as impulsive as the plan sounds, but that it’s time for him to make this kind of a move and it’s one he’s excited about.Mueller has been interested in music since he was young. On arriving at Harvard, he decided not to pursue a music degree because it is focused on theory and he is more interested in performance. Psychology allows him to understand people better, which helps in acting. In addition to his time with the Krokodiloes and Hasty Pudding Theatricals, Mueller composed, sang, and played piano on his own. He acknowledges that the Hasty Pudding’s style is different from his own music, but he relishes the Pudding experience nonetheless.When asked what advice he’d give incoming freshmen, Mueller advises them not to listen to any.“Make your own mistakes,” Mueller said. “Trying to apply what others learned from their mistakes will short-circuit your own experience.”last_img read more

Digitizing the classics

first_imgLong before the Italians rediscovered original Greek sources during the Renaissance, Arab scholars recognized the importance of ancient science and philosophy and began translating precious writings into Arabic. Now, Classics Professor Mark Schiefsky wants to transform those ancient Greek texts and their Arabic translations into an open-access digital corpus that could provide important insight into the development of science in the classical world.During the Abbasid period, which began in the mid-eighth century, Islamic caliphs started sponsoring the translation of ancient Greek and Roman texts. While Arabs had their own literary traditions and did not systematically translate Greek literature, they were interested in Greco-Roman mathematical and medical treatises and philosophical writings.“People recognized that Greek texts contained a lot of knowledge that superseded the knowledge available in the Arab world at that time, and realized that it would be fruitful to adopt that knowledge,” Schiefsky explained.He added that the decision to translate these texts was motivated in part by a desire to compete with the Byzantine Empire to the West.“The Arabs wanted to say they were the true inheritors of the Greek tradition,” he said.But many ancient texts were also translated for practical reasons. The writings of Galen, a prominent second century physician, had an important influence on medicine in the Arab world, while the Greek philosopher Aristotle’s writings on logic were exploited in disputes over Islamic law. Even today, classical texts continue to resonate in the Arab world, Schiefsky said, citing Iranian Ayatollah Khomeini’s study of Plato’s “Republic” in creating the Iranian state.Schiefsky recently received a two-year grant from the Mellon Foundation to support the creation of this new, structured corpus of digitized Greek and Arabic texts. The corpus, a collaboration with the Perseus Project at Tufts University, will be used for studying translations of Greek texts and their reception in Arab culture up until the present.The Greco-Arabic “bilingual lexicon,” as he calls it, is not the first project in which Schiefsky has used sophisticated technological tools to serve humanistic research. The Archimedes Project, which he led in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, assembled myriad scientific texts in different languages, allowing for new investigations into the history of mechanics. As with the Archimedes project, the vastly wider body of information that will be available in the bilingual lexicon will enable researchers to pose new statistical questions about how particular features of texts change over time. The lexicon thus represents a kind of shift from the traditional philological approach, with its focus on words and details, to a more comparative approach.“How do conceptions of medicine, say, or mathematics, change over the long term when we move from Greek to Arabic to Latin sources?” Schiefsky asked. “To address such questions in a comprehensive way requires taking a huge corpus of material into account. Modern information technology offers many new tools and approaches for such analysis, which are only now beginning to be applied in the humanities on a large scale. Despite a large number of digitization efforts over the years, there is still a lot of work to do just to get the basic data in a suitable form.”A large body of Greek writings from Homer up to 600 A.D. has already been digitized by the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, though the thesaurus is not available in the public domain.Schiefsky’s project will contribute additional Greek texts in areas like science, medicine, and philosophy, as well as Arabic texts that are mostly, but not entirely, translations from the Greek. One of the database’s most important features, he said, will be correlating parallel sections of text, allowing scholars to compare phrases or passages page to page.“Searching is very nice, and Google is very good at searching. But you can do a lot more than search every time a word appears,” Schiefsky remarked, citing examples like determining how frequently certain terms were used at different points in history.“I’m interested in the development of knowledge and the development of science, so you need good linguistic tools to do that,” he said.A member of Harvard’s Digital Humanities Working Group, Schiefsky believes strongly in harnessing open-access technology for the benefit of collaborative scholarship. The digital corpus will be entirely open access, using a Creative Commons license that allows other scholars to use and improve the software.“We’re moving away from a way of working in the humanities with one scholar making a change to a text that is incorporated into future editions for eternity, and toward more collaborative methods,” Schiefsky said.last_img read more

Moot points, well made

first_imgThe experience of earlier moot court contests and many hours of rigorous study can seem to melt into the ether when surviving third-year Harvard Law School (HLS) students face not just any panel of esteemed judges but one led by a U.S. Supreme Court justice.On Thursday, the teams in the showdown round of the Ames Moot Court Competition tried to persuade a panel headed by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to change the law of the land.That’s what student Jessica Palmer was trying to do when she argued that her fictional client was protected by the First Amendment even though he lied when claiming in an online dating profile that he was awarded the Navy Cross for service as a SEAL in the first Gulf War. Palmer’s client in the test case sampling thorny, unsettled legal issues was convicted of violating the Stolen Valor Act, which punishes lies about receiving military honors.Under questioning from Sotomayor about why the Supreme Court couldn’t just apply recent rulings on First Amendment issues to this case, Palmer offered, “Madam Justice, you could find that.”A broad smile spread across the Supreme Court justice’s face as she said, “We could do whatever we may.”Sotomayor later acknowledged that she and her brethren are a tough crowd for petitioners when she addressed the Austin Hall audience that included many student contenders defeated in earlier moot court rounds: “For all you who think you could have done a better job, come up front and give us a try.”“This is really hard. The hardest thing you could do as a lawyer is to argue before the Supreme Court,” said Sotomayor, who was the newest justice on the court until former HLS Dean Elena Kagan was confirmed last year. “You have learned your skills well. Your performance gives me hope for the profession.”The panel — which included Chief Judge Frank H. Easterbrook of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit Court and Peter J. Rubin, J.D. ’88, of the Massachusetts Court of Appeals — did not decide the merits or the law of the case. But it ruled Matthew Greenfield of the prosecution team the best oralist, and Greenfield and Caroline Anderson the winners of the oral competition. The best brief award went to Palmer and to Adam Hallowell’s team, which included students Avis Bohlen, Yvonne Saadi, Matthew Scarola, and Benjamin Watson. The prosecution team also included Stephen Pezzi, Mitchell Reich, Stephanie Simon, and Noah Weiss.Oralists Matthew Greenfield and Caroline Anderson were on the Belva Ann Lockwood Memorial Team.In the case, a man named Otis Garfield had an online profile that boasted he’d twice climbed Mount Kilimanjaro, tracked lions in Botswana, and won the Navy Cross — even though his Gulf War experience inspired him to spread the message that “loving America means speaking out against — not fighting in — unnecessary wars.”In the example, Garfield was prosecuted after a woman who dated him reported his false claims about the medal to law enforcement, and he received a prison term despite a trial judge’s error in failing to allow him to speak at his sentencing.The questioning took an entertaining twist when Rubin challenged the student lawyers on the impact of Garfield’s lies. “Didn’t he lie to women asking them to rely on those lies in attempt to secure a date? I know my time is valuable, and I assume yours is. Why isn’t this fraud?”Palmer said that she couldn’t invoke a fraud claim because the lower court did not make that finding, and there was no monetary loss to Garfield’s victims.To reach the final round of the century-old Ames competition, students face off in three rounds over two years. In the beginning, there are 40 teams, but only two teams of six advance to the final competition.In announcing the winners, Sotomayor might well have been referring to rulings on the high court as well: “You force us to make choices that are never easy, but we have to break the ties.”last_img read more