Bookmark of the month

first_imgThe Masie Centerwww.masie.comUnashamedly American, but packed full of useful links, articles, researchand reports on the subject of e-learning. If you’re a beginner, it may be too soonto go to the online arm of the Masie Center, which describes itself as aninternational “e-lab and think-tank”, dedicated to “exploringthe intersection of learning and technology”. Its content can feeloverwhelming, but if you’re already an e-learning champion or are trying togather material for an informed report, it’s an excellent resource. The manbehind it is Elliott Masie, a pioneer in technology, learning andorganisational development for the past 27 years, who’s acted as consultant toover 3,000 organisations from the CIA to Walt Disney. There is a paid-foraspect to the site (and you can join its E-learning Consortium for $5,000annually), but much of the material is free to access. A bonus is the areadedicated to Masie’s presentation material, which is full of soundbites thatare perfect to quote at the boss. You can also sign up for free to the regularonline technology update and newsletter TechLearn Trends. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Bookmark of the monthOn 1 Jan 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Dixie State Men’s Basketball’s Jack Pagenkopf Named RMAC Offensive Player of the Week

first_imgNovember 13, 2019 /Sports News – Local Dixie State Men’s Basketball’s Jack Pagenkopf Named RMAC Offensive Player of the Week Brad James Tags: Dixie State Classic/Dixie State men’s basketball/Jack Pagenkopf/Providence Montana/RMAC Offensive Player of the Week/Saint Martin’s FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. GEORGE, Utah-Late Tuesday, the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference named Dixie State men’s basketball senior guard Jack Pagenkopf as their offensive player of the week for his heroics amid the Trailblazers’ 2-0 start.The 6-3 190-pound native of Brooklyn, N.Y., via Blue Valley High School and Howard College, averaged 13 points, 12 rebounds and (RMAC-best) 8.5 assists and a steal per game in Dixie State’s wins over Texas A&M-Commerce and Texas-Tyler at the D2 Conference Challenge hosted by Westminster College of Salt Lake City this past weekend.In Saturday’s 100-91 win over Texas-Tyler, Pagenkopf became the first Dixie State student-athlete in the NCAA Division II era to post a triple-double. Pagenkopf netted 17 points, 13 rebounds and 10 assists against the Patriots to achieve this feat.The Trailblazers host NAIA foe Providence (Mont.) Friday at 7:30 pm followed by a Saturday match-up against Saint Martin’s Saturday at 8:00 pm at Burns Arena as part of the 2019 Dixie State Classic. Written bylast_img read more

Campus Safety Support Short-Term

first_imgDefinitionUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*REPRESENTATIVE DUTIES:On a temporary basis, provide campus safety assistance. Performsadditional related duties as assigned.Qualifications and Physical DemandsMINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:Education and Experience:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Or, any combination of education an experience that wouldprovide the required equivalent qualifications. The physical demands are representative of those that must bemet by an employee to successfully perform the essential functionsof this job.The work environment characteristics are representative ofthose an employee encounters while performing the essentialfunctions of this job.Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individualswith disabilities to perform the essential functions.A detailed list of physical demands and work environment is onfile and will be provided upon request.The Coast Community College District is a multi-college districtthat includes Coastline Community College , Golden WestCollege , and Orange Coast College . The three colleges offerprograms in transfer, general education, occupational/technicaleducation, community services and student support services.Coastline, Golden West and Orange Coast Colleges enroll more than60,000 students each year in more than 300 degree and certificateprograms.Since it’s founding in 1947, the Coast Community College Districthas enjoyed a reputation as one of the leading community collegedistricts in the United States. Governed by a locally elected Boardof Trustees, the Coast Community College District plays animportant role in the community by responding to needs of achanging and increasingly diverse population.This direct link 2020 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (ASFSR) is the 2020Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Coast Colleges. Thecrime statistics for calendar years 2017, 2018, and 2019 weresubmitted to the U.S. Department of Education as required under theJeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus CrimeStatistics Act. A hardcopy can be provided from one of the CampusSafety Offices. Please contact any of the Campus Safety Offices forany questions regarding the report.Coast Community College District is an Equal OpportunityEmployerThe Coast Community College District is committed to employingqualified administrators/managers, faculty, and staff members whoare dedicated to student learning and success. The Board recognizesthat diversity in the academic environment fosters awareness,promotes mutual understanding and respect, and provides suitablerole models for all students. The Board is committed to hiring andstaff development processes that support the goals of equalopportunity and diversity, and provide equal consideration for allqualified candidates. The District does not discriminate unlawfullyin providing educational or employment opportunities to any personon the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, genderexpression, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, sexualorientation, marital status, medical condition, physical or mentaldisability, military or veteran status, or geneticinformation.APPLICATIONS MAY BE FILED ONLINE AT:http://www.cccd.edu1370 Adams AvenueCosta Mesa, CA [email protected] LICENSES OR OTHER REQUIREMENTS :Some job assignments may require a valid California driver’slicense and/or possession of a license and/or certificate ofcompletion from an accredited college or agency relative to theassigned area. Continuing education, training or certification maybe required.Knowledge of:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Ability to:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Conditions of EmploymentUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*Employment is contingent upon verification of employment history,background verification as governed under Education Coderequirements, eligibility to work in the United States, andapproval by the CCCD Board of Trustees. Short term/temporaryassignments do not offer fringe benefits or pay for holidays ortime not worked but are entitled to sick leave per Labor Code2810.5. However, CalPERS retired annuitants are not entitled tothis benefit. The hours of work and effective date of employmentwill be arranged with the supervisor.Regular attendance is considered an essential job function; theinability to meet attendance requirements may preclude the employeefrom retaining employment.The person holding this position is considered a mandatedreporter under the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Actand is required to comply with the requirements set forth in CoastCommunity College District policies, procedures, and Title IX.(Reference: BP/AP 5910)The Coast Community College District celebrates all forms ofdiversity and is deeply committed to fostering an inclusiveenvironment within which students, staff, administrators, andfaculty thrive. Individual’s interested in advancing the District’sstrategic diversity goals are strongly encouraged to apply.Reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified applicantswith disabilities who self-disclose.Application materials must be electronically submitted on-lineat http://www.cccd.edu/employment . Incomplete applications and applicationmaterials submitted by mail will not be considered.Additional InformationAPPLICATION REQUIREMENTSTo be considered for employment you must submit a completeapplication packet. A complete application packet includes:Online Employment ApplicationAnswers to all of the supplemental questions.Candidates will also be responsible for all travel expenses ifselected for an interview, the Coast Community College Districtdoes not reimburse for candidate travel expenses.Disability AccommodationsIf you require accommodations in the Application or ExaminationProcess, please notify Human Resources by calling (714)438-4714.PHYSICAL DEMANDS AND WORK ENVIRONMENTlast_img read more

Friends of the Earth Present Vision of Carbon Neutral Oxford

first_imgThe suggested policies include workplace parking levies, congestion charging and even constraining road space. Oxford City Councillor Tom Hayes, Cabinet Member for Zero Carbon Oxford, said: “It’s not enough to declare a climate emergency and fail to follow up with action. “I strongly welcome this facts-first report which gives the councils that I work with more of the solutions they need to meet the climate crisis. Some of the suggested policies will be challenging to implement, but we must rise to the challenge. Although the report made no specific requests or references to Oxford University, there is a general call to use public investment to minimise inequality. They assert that the changes currently being made fail to meet the pace of what is required to avoid environmental collapse. Additional proposed edits to the county include a new tram railway service, a set of long-distance bike routes, the re-inclusion of beavers in the county’s ecosystem, and a new electric vehicle plant in Cowley. In one example, a pair of friends decide to eat out at a restaurant. Unusually, they decide that they will eat from the restaurant’s “meat” page. In this alternative society, meat has become a rare experience which is described as “strange and different.’’ “It’s not just about getting serious about becoming a zero carbon county it’s also about enjoying cleaner transport, homes to be proud of, and greener spaces.” Friends of the Earth Oxford begin the report by setting out the need for dramatic and fundamental changes to address climate collapse. Friends of the Earth, an international network of environmentalist organisations, has published a new report entitled “Fast Forward Oxfordshire” detailing their vision of a sustainable Oxford by the year 2040. Aside from combatting climate change, the report makes the case for a range of societal changes intended to improve universal quality of life and encourage a “safer” society. “More than 4,200 square metres of solar power panels have been installed across the University estate. “We know there is more to be done and will continue to work with partners across Oxfordshire on actions to tackle climate change.”center_img Published earlier this week, the report highlights the magnitude of the impending climate breakdown and outlines steps which must be taken on both a local and national level in government to deliver a fairer and healthier society. For example, Fast Forward Oxfordshire says that travellers should be pushed away from cars towards more sustainable means of transport, like trains or cycling. While commuters are driven away from driving, cycling and rail infrastructure should be improved, including the commissioning of new rail links and re-commissioning of old, now disused rail lines. A spokesperson for the University of Oxford said: “The University, our staff and our students are deeply engaged in improving our sustainability. It also promotes the advantages of harnessing the spending power of ‘anchor institutions’ which includes universities. “Through our Green Impact scheme, around 6,500 members of staff and students have taken actions to encourage more sustainable workplaces. Our Student Switch-Off campaign, which encourages practical energy saving and recycling, involves more than 3,000 students every year. “The University has invested over £4 million in carbon reduction projects and emissions have fallen steadily since 2010, despite a large expansion in the size of the University estate. “The University switched to a 100% wind power supply from Scottish Power in 2017, for which we pay a premium. Divided into six sectors: homes & settlements, transport, work, energy, food, and nature, each section begins with a short description of an ordinary scenario in 2040, but whose artefacts differ drastically from contemporary life. last_img read more

Hundreds Of Students Graduate From The University Of Southern Indiana

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Hundreds Of Students Graduate From The University Of Southern IndianaDECEMBER 8TH, 2018 AMANDA PORTER INDIANAStudents at the University of Southern Indiana are moving onto to the next phase of their lives.The University held its two fall commencement ceremonies Saturday in the Physical Activities Center. One ceremony for the College of Nursing and Health Professions and Pott College of Science, Engineering, and Education, and another for the College of Liberal Arts and Romain College of Business.While students were excited to leave college and move to the next chapter of their life some were still having a hard time believing their college experience was over.“Very excited, yeah definitely. It was a great ceremony, they did a great job.“It was beautiful. I don’t think it’s hit me yet. has it hit you? Nope, no…” says USI graduates Samantha Hoy Haas, and Mackenzie Cross.In all, 666 students participated in the two ceremonies with 116 of those students graduating with academic honors. TwitterFacebooklast_img read more

John L. Sanders Memorial – Evansville Bar Foundation

first_img2016 Grant AwardsThe Evansville Bar Foundation (EBF) will be presenting its 2016 grants at a luncheon which will be held on Wednesday, September 21, Noon at the Tropicana Conference Center.Grants will be awarded to Holly’s House, Youth Resources Teen Court Program, Indiana Legal Services, YMCA Youth & Government Program, Volunteer Lawyer Program of SW IN, Voices, Inc., CASA, Inc. and EBA Diversity Taskforce at this reception.Formed in 1999 by a generous donation from Evelyn Sanders, the widow of the late John Sanders, a longtime practicing Evansville attorney and continued by annual donations from members of the Evansville Bar Association, the Evansville Bar Foundation awards grants each year to deserving law related programs and organizations within the Evansville community.John Sanders’ love of the law, exemplified by his 75 years in the practice, serves as a strong guideline for the Foundation’s Statement of Purpose: Promoting Justice and Improving Lives Through the Law.  These recipients exemplify that purpose.  All EBF grant recipients and donors are invited to attend.Media welcome.For more information, please contact Susan Vollmer 463-3201.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

News story: Defence Secretary outlines plans for Indo-Pacific security at global summit

first_imgBefore heading to the summit, the Defence Secretary travelled to Malaysia, where he met with his new counterpart, Mohamad bin Sabu.From there, he travelled to Brunei to observe a display of skills from British jungle forces posted there, as well as taking time to speak to the soldiers and their families personally.The Defence Secretary then moved onto the final leg of the trip, in Singapore, to attend the three-day Shangri-La Dialogue. The Defence Secretary was among several high-profile speakers at the 17th annual Shangri-La Dialogue Asia Security Summit, in Singapore, where he emphasised the need for partners to come together to tackle shared and increasing challenges.Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said: Standing united with allies is the most effective way to counter the intensifying threats we face from countries that don’t respect international rules. Together with our friends and partners we will work on a more strategic and multinational approach to the Indian Ocean region – focussing on security, stability and environmental sustainability to protect our shared prosperity. A Memorandum of Understanding, strengthening defence ties between the UK and Singapore, was signed in the margins of the summit by Mr Williamson and his counterpart Ng Eng Hen. Crown copyright.After listening to heads of state and other notable figures, as well as holding private bilateral meetings, Mr Williamson formed part of an expert panel alongside representatives from France and Singapore to discuss improving regional security co-operation.A Memorandum of Understanding, strengthening defence ties between the UK and Singapore, was signed in the margins of the summit by Mr Williamson and his counterpart Ng Eng Hen.He then visited personnel on board HMS Sutherland, which was docked nearby as one of three British ships that will form a largely unbroken naval presence in the region through 2018. Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson speaking on board HMS Sutherland. Crown Copyright.last_img read more

Musical Masters Young & Old Celebrate The Allman Brothers In Brooklyn [Pro-Shot Video/Audio]

first_imgOn Saturday, September 23rd, an all-star collective of musicians gathered at Brooklyn Bowl to pay homage to fallen musical heroes Gregg Allman and Butch Trucks. “The Road Goes On Forever: Celebrating The Music Of The Allman Brothers” was Brooklyn Comes Alive‘s tribute to those two iconic musicians and the incredible music that they created, and it featured an impressive and diverse array of musicians from across the improvisational music universe.Helmed by the longtime musical director of Gregg Allman Band and local New York favorite, Scott Sharrard, the band was rounded out by Al Schnier and Vinnie Amico from moe., Bernard “Pretty” Purdie, Nate Werth of Snarky Puppy, Joey Porter from The Motet, and Sharrard’s Gregg Allman Band bandmate Brett Bass. The band was joined by a number of amazing guitar players along the way, with Eric Krasno (Soulive/Lettuce), Rob Compa (Dopapod), Roosevelt Collier, Dave Harrington and Brandon “Taz” Niederauer all jumping on stage throughout the two-hour set.Watch Eric Krasno, John Scofield, George Porter Jr., Cyril Neville, & More Jam In Brooklyn [Pro-Shot]When the band took the stage, Sharrard announced a surprise, that the band would be performing a re-creation of The Allman Brothers Band’s 40th Anniversary show at the Beacon Theatre from March 26th, 2009. The setlist featured back-to-back renditions of The Allman Brothers Band’s first two albums: The Allman Brothers Band and Idlewild South. Featuring undeniable classics and cherished b-sides, the setlist was an ambitious choice that this group of players handled with ease. The band came hot out of the gate with fiery renditions of  “Don’t Want You No More” and “It’s Not My Cross To Bear”, with Amico, Purdie and Werth linking up to imitate the Allman Brothers’ unique percussive sound, Porter emulating Allman on the organ, and Sharrard and Schnier nailing the band’s iconic dual-guitar approach.With the audience sufficiently warmed up, Sharrard brought out the first guest of the evening, Connor Kennedy, who helped out on guitar and vocals on several songs throughout the night. Kennedy’s passionate vocals were showcased on “Black Hearted Woman” and “Trouble No More”, which also featured Compa. When Compa joined the band, Schnier moved from electric to acoustic guitar, adding a studio-like-quality to the performance. The night was filled with amazing guest appearances, with improvisational upstart Dave Harrington, who was on hand for a performance with his Merry Pranksters later that evening, harmonizing on with him perfectly on “Every Hungry Woman”, and then turning in one of the standout performances of the evening with an out-there version of “Dreams.”Following Harrington’s appearance, fourteen-year-old Brandon “Taz” Niederauer strutted on stage, and the anticipation in the room was palpable. Taz is a Brooklyn Comes Alive vet, having stunned audiences at last year’s event during the Earth, Wind & Power set orchestrated by The Nth Power. He spent the past four years being mentored by Allman, Trucks, and improvisational guru Col. Bruce Hampton, so needless to say emotions in the room were running high when Taz took the Brooklyn Bowl stage. The iconic bassline of “Whipping Post” began, and Sharrard and Niederauer took the excited audience on a journey of epic proportions. Taz was just incredible, nailing the song’s spacey rhythm guitar while Sharrard took his solo. When it was Taz’s turn to solo, he was patient, slowly building up in speed and intensity until he exploded, unleashing what can only be described as a ferocious attack on his guitar. The pure joy on Niederauer’s face was undeniable, and he truly shared his love for the Allman Brothers music with everyone in the room. Anyone in the room that night that witnessed this version of “Whipping Post” can attest, Brandon “Taz” Niederauer is one of the best guitarists in the live music community.Next up, Kennedy returned, and with him, he brought Eric Krasno and Roosevelt Collier to the stage. The trio helped the band with an uplifting “Revival”, the first song on, Idlewild South. Collier stayed on stage for the classic song “Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’, before the house band delivered a stirring version of “Midnight Rider”, with Schnier picking up his acoustic again while Kennedy and Sharrard nailed the song’s vocal harmonies.After that, Krasno returned the stage for the rest of the night, starting his portion of the show off with a fantastic rendition of “In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed”. The fourteen-minute version showcased exactly why Krasno is one of the most in-demand guitar players in the live music scene today. He and Sharrard were both on fire throughout, playing off each other and showing a real love and dedication to the music. Their intense solos got crazier and crazier, and the band latched on for some really powerful moments throughout the song.Krasno stayed on stage and took lead vocals on “Hoochie Coochie Man,” before Collier and Niederauer were summoned back on stage for the night’s finale,  a wild four-guitar dual on “Leave My Blues At Home”.One of the great parts of Brooklyn Comes Alive is how rare and unique each set is, and everyone in the room that night knew that they would never see this group of musicians playing this awesome music together again–it made the night all the more special. Sharrard and his rag-tag band of musicians gave it their all and put together a fitting tribute to the Allman Brothers, and it’s something no one in the room that night will ever forget.You can enjoy the full audio below, as recorded by Eric McRoberts.The Road Goes On Forever: Celebrating The Music Of The Allman Brothers | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 9/23/2017Don’t Want You No More > It’s Not My Cross To Bear, Black Hearted Woman*, Trouble No More*@, Every Hungry Woman#, Dreams#, Whipping Post$, Revival, Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’%^, Midnight Rider*, In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed^, Hoochie Coochie Man^, Leave My Blues At Home$%^*  w/ Connor [email protected] w/ Rob Compa# w/ Dave Harrington$ w/ Brandon “Taz” Niederauer% w/ Roosevelt Collier^ w/ Eric Krasnolast_img read more

Students furnish feedback on furniture

first_imgWhen Natalie Jacewicz ’13 and her blockmates moved into Winthrop House, there were some unexpected challenges — getting a futon for their common room up four flights of stairs was one.“Aside from the heavy lifting, it required a lot of coordination,” Jacewicz said. “Choosing it, buying it, putting it in storage until we could move it into the suite, … it was quite an adventure.”Thanks to House renewal, future generations will be spared this trial. As each House is renewed, the College will replace the hundreds of futons and secondhand chairs that undergraduates have been purchasing for generations with new furniture.“When the Old Quincy test project, the first section of a House to be renewed, reopens next fall, the building will be fully furnished with beds, desks, tables, couches, and other comfortable furniture,” said Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds.Over the past two weeks, College administrators have been actively gathering student feedback on how the common spaces and student bedrooms will be furnished.During a recent open house at the Student Organization Center at Hilles (SOCH), Jacewicz toured furniture displays from four different companies. The candid, in-depth feedback gathered from the students will help administrators both narrow down specifications for ordering furniture for Old Quincy and work toward a standard to draw on for other Houses.“One of our goals was to select furniture that was flexible so that students could set their room up the way they wanted to,” said Merle Bicknell, assistant dean for Faculty of Arts and Sciences physical resources. “Some of the displays have two stackable dressers … others have beds that can be raised so that stackable dressers, or even a desk, can easily slip underneath.”Chris Farley ’16, who also attended the open house, welcomed the University’s effort to reach out to students. “Actively seeking student feedback like this really reflects favorably on Harvard,” Farley said. “Students know what it’s like to live in these spaces day in and day out, so they have insight and feedback that can really help.“The fact that the University recognizes and values our feedback as the people living in these spaces and using these items, that they acknowledge that perspective as valuable, is extraordinary,” Farley added.Harvard furnishes 2.5 million square feet throughout its Houses, so part of the challenge is providing furniture that meets unified standards. Merle Bicknell, assistant dean for Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) physical resources, said that empowering the students to make the space their own is a key part of the project’s success.“One of our goals was to select furniture that was flexible so that students could set their room up the way they wanted to,” Bicknell said. “Some of the displays have two stackable dressers, which can be set up as a stand-alone dresser. Others have beds that can be raised so that stackable dressers, or even a desk, can easily slip underneath. We want to give them the ability to adjust the space as he or she sees fit.”Each of the four furniture displays features two sections: an average-size single bedroom and a common space suite area. Bedroom designs include a bed, desk, wardrobe, and bookshelves, while the common space designs seat up to 12 people and come in an array of armchairs, loveseats, ottomans, and sofas.“I was surprised by all the options,” Farley said. “For example, one of the desks had several outlets for all the various gadgets you have in modern life built right into the desk. I saw that and immediately thought about how much easier my life would be if I had that.”The ability to customize the space is what caught Jacewicz’s attention. “The administrators also encouraged us to say how we would mix and match the different pieces — they were really interested in knowing how to further improve the options on display.”For Carina Myteveli, administrative operations officer with FAS resources, the open house and student tours of the displays offer a chance to think outside the box. “We’re just asking students to look at the furniture and tell us what they think,” Myteveli said. “Do you like the fabric, the arms of a chair, the table? All these pieces can be customized to students’ overall feedback and specifications. We want to give students the most options we can; they live in these spaces for so many years, and it’s their home away from home. We want to give them the opportunity to make that space their own, as much as we can.”“I’m a senior, so there’s not a possibility of my enjoying it,” Jacewicz said wistfully. “But it will be cool to come back 10 or 15 years down the line, and know that I had some hand in the decision. It’s nice to be able to leave a mark on Harvard in this way.”last_img read more

‘Disability is not the whole of who you are’

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the fifth day in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s story focuses on the social impact of disabilities at the College and University.For students with disabilities, the University and College provide notetakers, extended test time and accessible dorm rooms, among other resources.But the impact of disabilities extends beyond the classroom and the residence hall, and the Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities and the Disability Resource Office cannot solve all the challenges that come with everyday social interactions for those students.  Elizabeth Anthony, a senior with autoimmune conditions including lupus and celiac disease, says the accompanying chronic fatigue has impacted her social relationships.“Just because it feels so stupid to always say you’re tired, but when you have chronic fatigue it’s not really something that you can just explain to other people. Going out for me is just not really an option, because I can’t drink, I cannot stay up past midnight — it just doesn’t work for me,” she said. “And trying to explain that to people, and then trying to still be engaged in social things. My friends have been great, but it’s changed our relationship a lot, just in what I’m able to do.”Anthony said she has felt that a number of times throughout her career at Notre Dame, she has had to choose between friends or school work. “So you know a lot of times, you’ll see things that say, ‘You can have a social life or sleep or good grades — but not all three’? And I think that’s true for every Notre Dame student, but for me sleep is no longer a choice,” she said. Grace Agolia, a junior who is deaf and uses a cochlear implant, says because her disability is an invisible one, she has to constantly remind people of effective communication strategies, such as speaking with an appropriate volume. “In situations with background noise, it’s very hard. I often feel lost, and I have to turn to the person next to me and say, ‘What was that?’ And people can get very tired of doing that, and I understand that’s annoying,” she said. When eating in the dining hall, Agolia said she always attempts to position herself to hear as many people at the table as she can.  “Even just people like diagonally from me, just across can be really hard to hear. Because South Dining Hall can be really loud — North is better in terms of acoustics because it has carpeting. South Dining Hall has no carpeting, and high ceilings, so the acoustics are bad,” she said. “So I try to make my needs known to my friends, like can we sit in a table in a quieter part of the dining hall, like in a corner or something, or can I sit over here, because it will help me hear better. So a lot of times that has to come from me.”Agolia said she is appreciative when friends recognize what she needs without her having to ask for accommodations. “I really, really appreciate it when my friends remember to walk on my right side, and not on my left, it’s super helpful. It just makes my day when people remember,” she said. “And when I feel lost or confused in a conversation, when one of my friends sees my look of confusion and turns to me and speaks closely to my implant, especially in a noisy situation, just telling me what that person said. And having patience when I say ‘what’ fifty times in a row.”Fiona Van Antwerp, a sophomore at Saint Mary’s with dyslexia, said she told her friends about her disability halfway through her first semester of College, and it took them a while to figure it out and understand, but they have been supportive.“They ask me, ‘What can we do for you? How can we help you?’” she said. “My roommate asks if she can play music because she knows I’m an auditory learner.”Ross Kloeber, a first-year law student who is hard of hearing, said he wishes people would push through their discomfort with his disability. “For me, a lot of times people will get uncomfortable when the communication breaks down, so if I’m not hearing you, with stress, I stop lip-reading as well, with things like that,” he said. “All those things happen, and they get frustrated, they feel like they’re doing something wrong or there’s something wrong with me — all those things happen at once. It just creates this breakdown in communication, and people do not see the interaction as worth getting over that breakdown.”Megan Crowley, a freshman at Notre Dame, has Pompe disease, which progressively weakens muscles.  Editor’s note: Crowley spoke to The Observer with the assistance of her nurse, Debbie Larsen, who is quoted below.“One of the things that bothers her the most is she understands some people don’t talk to her, but she prefers that to someone who’s talking to her and acting like they understand her and they really don’t,” Larsen said. “They don’t want to ask you to repeat yourself. She’s okay with repeating herself as many times as she needs to, but people don’t usually ask.”  Jessica Ping is a freshman at Notre Dame who has CHILD syndrome, a limb and skin deficiency, and has only partial limbs on her left side. “One thing I notice a lot is people are almost, I don’t really want to say afraid, but they don’t know how to handle the situation, so they don’t really confront it,” she said. “They’ll be social, but most of the time I have to be the one to initiate the conversation, which is fine, but it would be nice for a reciprocal type thing.”Kloeber said he has found navigating the social aspect of law school to be “what you make of it” with a disability.“Obviously, people with disabilities face unique struggles with socializing, but I want to be careful and not try to homogenize it,” he said. “Everyone has different struggles — whereas my thing might be trying to communicate with people in a loud bar, it would be different from what someone else might be dealing with. It’s not one experience, it’s just different.”Agolia said people have been accepting of the fact that she is more than her disability.“Disability is not the whole of who you are,” she said. “It is a part of my identity, but it doesn’t define me.”News writers Megan Valley and Madison Jaros contributed to this story. Tags: disabilitylast_img read more